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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, picked up a used 80 gal CH compressor the other day. It looks like a real mammoth, but unfortunately my buddy and I didn't know anything about 3ph, so now we have a unit we can't run in our garage. The garage is equipped with 220v and a 50amp breaker, so it should be able to run it no problem. It runs my 170amp MIG without difficulty.

Now, we've talked about converting a single phase motor, but we want to ensure that the rest of the unit is solid first. How do we go about checking the strength of the tank, operation of the pump, etc?

Can you just knock on the tank and listen for a different sound that would indicate rust? We can put our hand over the intake on the pump and turn the wheel and it builds vacuum, as it makes a suction sound when the hand is removed.

I can take high quality pictures of whatever you need, or video even. Very interested in getting this thing up and running, but not if it will be cost-prohibitive. We only spend 150$ on it, so we've got a bit of room to work, but I'd say 800$ total is the absolute ceiling. It also needs a pressure regulator for the switcher box. I'm not sure of anything else it needs.

Here are some pics.





 

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That thing looks great!
Make sure it's got oil. If you can turn it over by hand, you should be good to go.
Got one kind of like it. Hope you can find a motor.
Have a picture, but don't know how to post.
 

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Wow, nice setup! How does it work? Can you control the pressure of the tanks individually? Or is is essentially 240 gals of same pressure air as one giant reservoir?
 

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Thanks. The pressure is the same in all tanks. Air lines are 1" schedule 80 PVC. Have "M" quick disconnects on all ends. Can connect a regulator where and when needed.
100 psi is the cut on, 150 psi is the cut off. Really more air than needed, but the aux tanks were free. Paid $300 for the compressor, built in 1950. Purrs like a kitten.
The motor is a 3hp 240v single phase. Plenty of power for the compressor.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
We just ended up getting another compressor. They're cheap enough that it's not really worth converting one unless you basically get it for free, or it has some redeeming quality (been in the family, etc.)

It's an old Curtis, 60 gal, 1.5hp 220v 1ph. Even though it's 1.5hp, it seems like it's barely even working while building pressure. Shuts off at 120psi, comes back on a 90 (how it's currently set up), the previous owner said he'd had it to 150.

The only thing is it doesn't seem to have a drain on it, so we'll have to figure out a way to manage that situation.

It's the red one.
 

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The drain on mine is on the end where your valve is. There is a fitting with tube that extends to the bottom and pics up the water.
Tanks rarely go bad and when they do, it's usually a pin hole leak on the bottom.
The aux tanks in my pic are dated 1946. Just painted them before pic, Massey Ferguson red.
 

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As far as I can tell, there are only 4 openings in the tank (not counting the spot where the pump puts air in, or the pressure regulator), there's the t-bar at the right end in the pic, with the blue shut off valve where the hoses attach, there's a dump valve at the other end, and then there are the two big (not sure maybe 2", I'm guessing) holes on the front at either end of the face of the tank (visible in the picture, it has a large square nut). It looks like to use any of them as a drain, we'd have to lift the tank somehow, which right now isn't feasible. It would be easier if we had an engine hoist, but we don't yet.
 
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