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Discussion Starter #21
That generator is only a 120V generator. Not what you'll want to connect to your 240V main panel. It would be good for a small 120V RV or for standalone use with the triple outlet cord you mentioned.
Its beginning to look like that is the route I will have to take. But if I can figure a way to get a generator further from my house, I may purchase a different one. Still looking at all my options. Thanks! Hadn't even taken that into consideration.
 

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Are qa
That generator is only a 120V generator. Not what you'll want to connect to your 240V main panel. It would be good for a small 120V RV or for standalone use with the triple outlet cord you mentioned.
Not true. I've powered my 240 volt panel for years using this adapter.


It connects to the RV plug on one end and to the L14-30 connector on the other end. The hots are bridged in the adapter, providing 120 volts to each side of the panel buss. It is UL approved and safe. It DOES NOT provide 240 volts, only 120. It works flawlessly, but the 240 volt breakers need to be turned off in the panel.
 

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It works flawlessly, but the 240 volt breakers need to be turned off in the panel.
Again, NOT what a first-time generator user wants to be messing with. It's too easy to forget something (or have another unknowing person try to use it) and damage 240V items.
 

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Again, NOT what a first-time generator user wants to be messing with. It's too easy to forget something (or have another unknowing person try to use it) and damage 240V items.
You have a good point. As an old retired electrician I tend to take too much for granted sometimes. I only have one 240v breaker in my panel (Dryer) and I usually put a piece of blue painters tape over it to let others know not to turn it on. He has several 240v breakers in his so his chances of turning one on by mistake is much greater.
 

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You have a good point. As an old retired electrician I tend to take too much for granted sometimes. I only have one 240v breaker in my panel (Dryer) and I usually put a piece of blue painters tape over it to let others know not to turn it on. He has several 240v breakers in his so his chances of turning one on by mistake is much greater.
better yet do the lock out tag out for the 240 vac breakers when on 120 volt gen set.
or switch over to a gas dryer.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
I have found an electrician that might be in my price range. I have also found a 100" 10AWG cord that can let me safely run my generator 20 feet from the house. I am also looking at different generators, maybe find one with an l15-30 rather than the 120 Volt 3 prong that you guys were discussing. I am asking the seller of the interlock kit that iowagold recommended me, as mine has 1" spacing, but that one calls for 3/4" spacing. I will keep y'all updated!
 

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Discussion Starter #29 (Edited)
I am trying to get my parts list together for my upcoming meeting with this electrician.
I know that I will need an interlock, but I also realize that I will need a breaker for the generator. The generator I am leaning towards now is this:
What size breaker will I need? From what I am reading, it would seem that my generator would be 30 amps from that l15-30 connection. So do I need a single pole or a 2 pole breaker?
Thanks!

Edit: This looks to be the correct one, but again, I am totally new at all this:
 

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I've not been in a square D panel in 20 years (I've only worked on Siemens, GE, Murray) so I'm not at all familiar with their breakers but I don't think that's the one you need. You definitely need a 30 amp 2 pole breaker. Your electrician can tell you which one to get or he may have one on his truck if he works on Square D stuff. The only interlock kit I see made for the Square D panel with a 1" spacing is a Square D Kit K-5110 and it's $145 on the sites I found it. No way in the world I would pay that for a 99 cent piece of sheet metal. That's the reason I made mine but I understand if you can't do that. If you have a friend with some basic metalworking tools there are some youtube videos on making them. It took me about 30 minutes. I would also be a little leery of a 100 foot generator cord. If you could find a way to use a 50 foot one it would save you some money and help keep current loss to a minimum.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Yes, I do not like the 100' cable idea at all, but my power box is in my attached garage, and if I mount the receptacle on the other side of that, I have a narrow side yard, 10 feet away from my fence, with no way get the generator further than 10 feet from my attached garage. So, I have to run that cable 45 feet to the back of my house, where I then need another 20 feet to keep the generator in the backyard, 30 feet from the house. So what I really need is an 85-foot cord, but I do not see one anywhere. The only other option is to use the first scenario from my original post, with the generator in the same spot in the back yard, but just running the 10 AWG breakout cord into my house through the same window as the A/C is in. I am still on the fence about what is the better option.
The first option was about $1500 total, the second option is $2500 (if the labor is about $300, and my guess is that it will be), with the only downside being that 100' 10AWG cable running down the outside of my house. And, almost doubling my cost.
Also, doing it the second way I will also have to figure out how to ground it, whereas using the extension cord route, no ground is needed.
As I am typing this, I am starting to lean towards the first option. Simple, functional, less expensive, no need to hire anyone.

I suppose a third option would be to install a receptacle outside the window, that would take in the 10AWG generator cable, and then have a dedicated outlet in that one room that needs the power. It would need 3 sockets. 1 for window a/c, 1 for a refrigerator (need a 50' 12AWG cord for that, to reach the kitchen), and one for a power strip to run my TV, Internet modem, laptop charger, and lamp.
As I am mulling my options, does anyone here ever heard of such an outlet set up? TT30p on one side and 3 or 4regular 110 on the other?
 

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Kris, you said you just moved to the area. I would suggest that you talk to some folks that have lived there for a few years and ask about past history power outages. If it’s like where I live and the norm is an extended outage (more than 24 hours) every 2-5 years I would go the cheapest and easiest route. If you can expect an extended outage every year then spend a little more and be prepared for it. I’ve got friends in Houston that have very seldom lost power but I know some on the south side have been out for weeks. Every city and every neighborhood is different it seems. The newer neighborhoods with underground service have fewer outages than the ones with power lines running overhead for instance. Good luck in which option you choose. I do think the Champion generator you picked is an excellent choice.
 
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