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Discussion Starter #1

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What does the manual say? I'd imagine 10W-30 would be good, possibly down to 5W-30.

There is debate on the subject, but what I've heard most often is to use conventional oil until you have 5-10 hours on the engine, then change to synthetic. That's what I'd do, if it was mine. Going synthetic too early can perhaps cause issues with proper seating of the piston rings, depending on what info you believe.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The spec on the ebay site says "10W30 or 10W40" but in the manual it says SAE 30 aswel. I have been using the SAE 30 from first use and Im guessing that oil isn't "synthetic" that I have been using?. Id say I have used the generator for about 5 hrs or just under in total now.

Anyway what is "synthetic" oil?
 

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The spec on the ebay site says "10W30 or 10W40" but in the manual it says SAE 30 aswel. I have been using the SAE 30 from first use and Im guessing that oil isn't "synthetic" that I have been using?. Id say I have used the generator for about 5 hrs or just under in total now.

Anyway what is "synthetic" oil?

Oooo! Now there is a question. Here is a post all about oil and the grades in relation to generators.

Hopefully that will answer your questions.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)

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Don't use xW-40 unless your manual suggests it. xW-30 is more common, and is closer to what you're using now. I'd imagine that 10W-30 would probably be good, but that's based on some manuals for equipment that I have, nothing specific to your engine.

With 5 hours, I'd stay with conventional (non-synthetic) for now, until you get to maybe 10 hours. But if you haven't already, changing the oil at 5 hours is probably a good idea.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Don't use xW-40 unless your manual suggests it. xW-30 is more common, and is closer to what you're using now. I'd imagine that 10W-30 would probably be good, but that's based on some manuals for equipment that I have, nothing specific to your engine.

With 5 hours, I'd stay with conventional (non-synthetic) for now, until you get to maybe 10 hours. But if you haven't already, changing the oil at 5 hours is probably a good idea.
Thanks for the advice, Im just thinking how cold can the SAE 30 go down, because if that can stay thin in cold conditions, I might aswel stay with that..

The specs says use 10W30, 10W40 or SAE 30
 

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Thanks for the advice, Im just thinking how cold can the SAE 30 go down, because if that can stay thin in cold conditions, I might aswel stay with that..

The specs says use 10W30, 10W40 or SAE 30
The largest number is the when the engine is hot; so actually it will go as low as you like when the engine is running, it will always be hot. Stationary, when the engine is cold, the first number is more important.
 

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Thanks for the advice, Im just thinking how cold can the SAE 30 go down, because if that can stay thin in cold conditions, I might aswel stay with that..

The specs says use 10W30, 10W40 or SAE 30
I'm attaching the oil-weight chart for my EU2000i generator's manual. Its engine is splash-lubricated (no oil pump, no oil filter), as I presume is the case for your engine. They show 30 weight for down to 50F, 10C. And 5W-30 or 10W-30 down to about 5F, -15C.

Don't stay with the 30 weight as it gets too cold. I consider 30 an oil for summer-use-only engines. Not for something during the winter. It will be extra-thick in cold conditions, making the engine cord more difficult to pull, and reducing your splashing and lubrication until the engine warms up.

I don't see a benefit to 10W-40. You'd often go to thicker oil (40, vs 30) to reduce oil burning due to it leaking past worn piston rings. But your engine is new, so that isn't needed. It will just be thicker while up to temperature (so more drag on the engine), with no obvious advantage that comes to mind, at least for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The largest number is the when the engine is hot; so actually it will go as low as you like when the engine is running, it will always be hot. Stationary, when the engine is cold, the first number is more important.
Im just browsing now through them......
The SAE 30 has a temp range of 4c - 36c, so thats no good for the winter. All the 5/10w30/40 oils are all part or full synthetic, cant find any that are none synthetic?:tango_face_sad:
 

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Where are you looking? At least in the US, much of the oil, even multi-weight, is conventional, with synthetic "versions" also available. Being unable to find conventional 10W-30 would be weird, for here. If conventional is unavailable, I'd go partial-synthetic, until you're at more like 10 hours. Then fully-synthetic.
 

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FWIW, after break in period, all small engines here on the farm use 5W-30 Synthetic, the Super Tech from WalMart. Have had no issues and weird as it seems, they seem to run better and cooler. Some of these engines go back to the 60's when straight 30W was recommended. At last count there were 14, 3 are gensets. Also run multi-viscosity synthetic in LT and GT trannies, again after break in. For two cycle engines, use one pouch of synthethic to one gallon of MID grade gas, forget ratios. By using a multi-viscosity no need to worry about winter.
 
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