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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I did a propane conversion on my Troy-Bilt 5550 watt generator (model 01919) a year ago using one of the USA carburetor kits. It runs very smooth and clean on propane
The generator is in like new condition with maybe 30 hours of use total

I mention this because I am not sure if that conversion affected the output on my generator. Makes no sense to me, but I have to mention it.

I have not had to use it since I did the propane conversion.
A couple weeks ago we had a power outage at 4am and the power came back on at 10:30am

I ran the generator from about 7:30am to 10:30am on a 100 pound propane tank
I noticed that my 3 UPS for my computers and home entertainment system were charging and then they would shut down. They did this several times.

So I took a voltage reading and the generator was putting out 130 vac when the UPS were shutting down and when the voltage dipped down a bit lower, they would start charging again.
A low dip was still around 126vac and I saw as high as 131vac at one point

I had maybe 4500 watts load going at the time
The generator was not overloaded and the motor was not bogging down like when a big load starts up.

130vac output is way too high obviously
Is the voltage regulator having a bad day?
Can it be adjusted?
Has anyone ever experienced this?

Thanks for any help
Doug
 

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There is no voltage regulator on that generator. Most generators do not have them.

What is the rpm and frequency?

130 volts is a little high. Average residential power is 120 volts but it can vary +/- 5%.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
I was not aware of that, I thought there would have to be some sort of voltage regulation on the generator

This higher than normal voltage level will not work for my computer UPS devices.

It never was that high before the propane conversion.
I have run it may times before the conversion and never had a problem with my UPS devices.

I have no idea what the RPM of the generator is.
It does not sound any faster running on propane then it does on gasoline.
But if it is running a bit faster now on propane, can I reduce the running speed and bring the voltage down?

Since there is no voltage regulator, this seems like the only logical choice
 

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Do NOT try to adjust the RPM with a volt meter. You need a frequency meter, some multimeters will read frequency or you can get a Kil-O-Wat style meter.

Frequency is MUCH more important than the voltage.

Did you take the carb off to install the kit? It might be as simple as a linkage being bent just slightly. The governor doesn't care what fuel you run.

Set the RPM for about 63 hertz. You need it just a bit faster than 60 because when you load the generator it will slow down and come onto spec. Once you have your typical loads on it you can adjust it closer if you want. It's normal for the frequency to vary a bit with a mechanical governor.

I have a couple of generators. I can use the UPS's with some of them not all. If you check your computer power supply you'll find it likely can safely handle a wide range of voltages. Most devices that use switching power supplies are fairly tolerant - just about everything nowadays.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
The carb is still on the generator

The USA carb kit has a gas plate that bolts between the carb and the air cleaner. I can do Propane or gasoline.

The UPS's outlets that supply power after the AC is cut worked fine until the input AC reached about 129 or 130vac.
Then they would cut off and the whole unit would cut power to the receptacles and stop charging the internal batteries.
This happens on 3 different UPS's and two different brand names. They are all doing the same thing.

They never did this in the past running on a generator so the 10 volts over 120vac is a problem
The regular surge outlets on the UPS were not affected, but they are only surge protected outlets and don't supply backup power when the power fails

I'll check into the frequency measurement thing
 
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