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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm starting a new thread on my generator because I've fixed on problem and moved on to the next problem. Its a Generac Primepact 50g on a 2001 camping trailer. The starter switch works sometimes, but most the time it does not. I replaced the main control board on the unit and it seemed to fix the problem, but then the same thing started again about a day later. I've checked the starter solenoid, and that is good. I ordered a new starter switch, but I don't really think that is the issue because there is a switch on the inside as well with the same issues. I could replace the voltage regulator unit, however I do not believe that part would create this problem. But obviously I am not sure, which is why I am here. Any thoughts or advice would be greatly appreciated!
 

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Trace the circuit.

You do have a multi-meter, and know how to use it, right?

Your camper is a 2001 model. That is about 10 years old. Did any critters get in there where you can't see and chew on some wires? Are there any corroded connections?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Trace the circuit.

You do have a multi-meter, and know how to use it, right?

Your camper is a 2001 model. That is about 10 years old. Did any critters get in there where you can't see and chew on some wires? Are there any corroded connections?
No critters for sure. I do need to trace the circuit. I'm really trying to avoid taking the unit out of the trailer, but I may have to because there is no access to a lot of that stuff in its cubby.
 

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You'd be surprised what kind of wiring fiascos you can find unexpectedly.

I have a coax cable going out to a remote tuner at the base of a ham radio antenna that critters over the summer chewed through in 2 places - and it looks like they made a meal out of the wire too as both areas there was a good 2' of cable that had been chewed on.

In any event, tracing the wiring is your best bet. I am not sure how the control circuitry is on that unit, but if it is simple continuity (short to ground, or switching control signal voltage, like a 3v or 5v) to trip the control board's inputs that will be a lot easier to deal with than if you have resistive or variable voltage controls.

Of course, always check for cross continuity in wires, also. That isn't a good thing. This can be caused by abrasion over-the-road and during use if wiring harnesses aren't adequately protected and secured/supported during install/manufacture.

A simple starter switch probably switches battery voltage, but I could be off. I will have to look in to my Honda GX690 - I know it trips a solenoid to run the starter motor, but something tells me there is a control board like what you are dealing with on it. I know there is a fuel solenoid that, unless the key is in the "run" position, is closed. I could be wrong, but it wouldn't surprise me if the control panel was inputs to a board then the board tripped the loads.

In any event, tracing circuits will allow you to map out what is what. If you can get a (detailed, not a block diagram - IE spells out the wire colors, connectors, pin numbers) schematic before you dig in to it, all the better.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You'd be surprised what kind of wiring fiascos you can find unexpectedly.

I have a coax cable going out to a remote tuner at the base of a ham radio antenna that critters over the summer chewed through in 2 places - and it looks like they made a meal out of the wire too as both areas there was a good 2' of cable that had been chewed on.

In any event, tracing the wiring is your best bet. I am not sure how the control circuitry is on that unit, but if it is simple continuity (short to ground, or switching control signal voltage, like a 3v or 5v) to trip the control board's inputs that will be a lot easier to deal with than if you have resistive or variable voltage controls.

Of course, always check for cross continuity in wires, also. That isn't a good thing. This can be caused by abrasion over-the-road and during use if wiring harnesses aren't adequately protected and secured/supported during install/manufacture.

A simple starter switch probably switches battery voltage, but I could be off. I will have to look in to my Honda GX690 - I know it trips a solenoid to run the starter motor, but something tells me there is a control board like what you are dealing with on it. I know there is a fuel solenoid that, unless the key is in the "run" position, is closed. I could be wrong, but it wouldn't surprise me if the control panel was inputs to a board then the board tripped the loads.

In any event, tracing circuits will allow you to map out what is what. If you can get a (detailed, not a block diagram - IE spells out the wire colors, connectors, pin numbers) schematic before you dig in to it, all the better.
Yes, good points and good ideas. I'll run through the wiring this weekend hopefully. I have a hot tub that I picked up for free, and ended up rewiring half of the thing because something ate the wiring.
 

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also look for green connections at the connectors or under or over crimped wires as well.
we load test the harness wiring when we have a real hit and miss issue.

and use dielectric grease on all of the connections.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I ended up replacing the switch, and its starting up every time again. Now though, I ran it for a while, then I turned on the roof AC and it bogged down. I turned off the AC and it kept running a bit slow and was no longer putting power into the trailer. Checked breakers and fuses, and all was good there. I guess I'll check the carb.
 
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