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I have a 2010 30 ft. Catalina coachmanTT that has 1 AC unit and I'm looking at a champion 4000 watt RV ready DH series open frame inverter with quiet technology. This is our first RV and I have a lot to learn. This seems to be plenty of sufficient power supply and has a 4-star rating as generators go but need any input as to why I shouldn't purchase this, or why I should.
 

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You may want to reconsider getting an open-frame generator. Even with "quiet technology", it's still going to be relatively loud... the one thing that could be a problem on most campsites.

There are many silent generators that are fully-enclosed in the Wattage you need.... Firman, Westinghouse, Honda, Wen, etc.

Some examples:
 

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^ Yup, the open frame inverter gens are usually much louder than a comparable enclosed gen. When camping, noise means a lot more than it does for most home generator applications.

BTW, if you didn't know, if you buy a WEN they are free shipping (and usually no tax) if purchased from their website. I just bought a GN625i for our house.
 

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best thing is to take inventory of your 120 vac power needs for the RV.

the coach battery chargers can draw a lot of power.... up to 25 amps at 120 vac on the larger units.
and the microwave... the panasonic inverter microwave units work well for the campers.
also the hot water heater and the furnace....

what is to be the fuel for the gen set?
that always needs to be in the plan...

where are you to be camping?
if you are total remote camping alone then the noise is not that much of an issue..

but if this is for state fair use....
a quiet box would be a great idea.

most of the time for rv use in hot climates 5500 watts running power is about right...
take a look at the eu7000is honda gen set. they are super quiet..

and if your power needs are less the eu2200is gens work well.

make sure to use a soft starter for the aircon unit.
 

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most of the time for rv use in hot climates 5500 watts running power is about right...
take a look at the eu7000is honda gen set. they are super quiet..

and if your power needs are less the eu2200is gens work well.
Paul, Folks, what are your thoughts on using a connected pair of the smaller (closed frame) inverters in an RV setup like this? I don't have this, but I like the general idea. (I thought about getting this the last time I bought a new generator but need 240V and didn't see pair-ables available,) From a reliability perspective, you are significantly less likely to have a total outage running a pair and the overall cost could be less than one bigger inverter. Anyone have experience with pairs and 120V AC units?
 

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If you want to connect to an RV, wouldn't you need a 30 amp TT outlet? I would recommend the Wen GN400i. It's inexpensive, it's an inverter, it makes good power, and it has the 30 amp outlet. And you can parallel it if you need more power. It's $394 delivered. In my opinion, it's the best inverter value at the moment.

Wen GN400i
 

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Paul, Folks, what are your thoughts on using a connected pair of the smaller (closed frame) inverters in an RV setup like this? I don't have this, but I like the general idea. (I thought about getting this the last time I bought a new generator but need 240V and didn't see pair-ables available,) From a reliability perspective, you are significantly less likely to have a total outage running a pair and the overall cost could be less than one bigger inverter. Anyone have experience with pairs and 120V AC units?
i will pm on this
 

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Cheap generators are noisy so i always prefer these quiet generators. But, quiet generators are more expensive, but they will keep your neighbors from hating you. When analyzing generator specifications, keep in mind that decibels are measured on a logarithmic scale, so a difference of 5 or 10 dB is significant. Take note of how far the measurement was taken from the generator. Some low-cost generators take measurements from a long distance away.
 

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I would also like to recommend the WGen2000 Generator. I am impressed with this portable generator because it is full of several premium and innovative features while being offered at an unbeatable and competitive price. It can supply up to 2,500-watts peak power and 2,000-watt rated power.
 

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That WGen 2000 might be a "good buy", however something to consider with the wattage is what your head room is.

If you run a gen a lot over 60-70% load you start shortening the life of some components. Hard runs can be a good thing for break-in, but if you are planning on running a gen at 90% load, for example, most of the time - that isn't good for the gen.

Sometimes in larger/more pronounced examples it is easier to understand the concept - look at the different ratings for large permanently installed units (around 20kw to as big as you can think of - hundreds of kw) - you will see a different rating for "stand by" and "prime" uses. With "prime" there is a derate. There's your definition of what I described above - ask yourself why they are "derating" a generator like that? Answer - running it all the time over that load, though it can handle it for a short period, will shorten the life of the gen.

That being said - apply the concept to what Paul - iowagold - said in post #4 with regards to taking inventory of your loads. Once you find a base line of what your loading is then figure up maybe another 40% and that should give you the running wattage rating. Your starting load over that number is extra head room - don't use this number for sizing, even though it is the number most often advertised as what the gen can output.

For example - if your load comes to 1950 watts - size up to a generator with a running (not starting) wattage of 2730 watts or better. *Multiply 2730 x 1.37 and you get 3740w.

*We got a Champion 5500w gen recently. It is rated to 4000w running watts. Doing the math on that the starting load is about 37% over the rated running load.

Another example - if your load comes to 1000w that is (1000 x 1.4) = 1400 running wattage, (1400 x 1.37) = 1918 starting wattage.

Another example - if your load comes to 2200w that is (2200 x 1.4) = 3080 running wattage, (3080 x 1.37) = 4219 starting wattage.

So when you look at the numbers in the above perspective - you start seeing where having "head room" on the wattage plays in.

Now look at the generators that are rated to over 4000 watts. You'll likely find there are a few out there. Speaking of RV type enclosed units - that leaves you pretty much with Duromax and Champion.

What pushed me to Champion is the availability of parts and technical information. That means I can service my unit and not have to send it off to a repair place, or take it to a repair place. Without schematics and parts info that becomes much more difficult to do.

If your wattage requirement, again - heeding the "math", is lower - in the sub-3000w range you have more options. Working backwards from 3000w as your starting wattage rating (again - what most gens are advertised with, as opposed to running wattage) - that brings you down to 1134 watts running load in that "safe zone" - ((3000w x .63) .6) = 1134w. The .63 is your left over from the 37% of starting load rating, the .6 is your left over from a 40% reduction from running wattage "safe zone".

Others may have other thoughts on numbers for prolonged use, but the main thing to keep in mind is to stay under your running wattage, not your starting wattage. Starting wattage is good head room for hard to start loads - but shouldn't really be relied on. If you stay under the running wattage as your planned loading then when you do have a hard start load (like an AC unit, or a water pump, or an air compressor) - you still have head room (your safety margin on your running wattage plus your starting load) so as to not hit your gen to the extreme.
 

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I would also like to recommend the WGen2000 Generator. I am impressed with this portable generator because it is full of several premium and innovative features while being offered at an unbeatable and competitive price. It can supply up to 2,500-watts peak power and 2,000-watt rated power.
Are you talking about Wen's newest inverter? They are finally offering a dual fuel solution in their smaller inverters. It looks like a nice little unit.
 
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