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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Finally got around cleaning and painting the gas tank.

The tank started off absolutely nasty and I had half a mind to throw it out but then I realized I'd be shooting myself in the foot as they don't make these no more. Anyway, this little guy went through a vinegar, muriatic acid, and acetone bath. There's no hope of getting the inside back to pristine condition without spending way above its worth, but at least I got most of the varnish chunks out. Last thing I need is a solid gunk clogging the fuel lines.

The gen does have a sediment bowl and I've installed a red B&S fuel filter. I hope they're enough to protect the carb. Though I feel I may need to drop the carb bowl and clean it after running it for a few hours at least.

Not for the faint of heart...

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Checked it for leaks and ran it for several minutes.

It's now complete... :)
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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
A bit of a PSA while testing out a cheap Carbon Monoxide (CO) detector

Don't try this at home.

Not the most scientific method but this helps illustrate how fast CO from a generator can accumulate in an enclosed or semi-enclosed area. This is part of our garage with one side open. Even so, with the generator running at operating RPM (~3600 RPM), it can fill the area with poisonous CO gases in a matter of seconds. At low RPMs, it's not producing as much CO and it was able to safely dissipate outside.

CO is an odorless and colorless gas by-product of combustion and can be lethal to people and animals. Never operate your generator near living spaces or in areas where there's a possibility that combustion gasses can pool up and get to any person or pet. Remember: Proximity and airflow.

 

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well you took one for the team!
even in an open porch you can get some bad numbers.
remember that stuff is heavy...
so an inversion table is a good idea!!
hang like a bat for a bit.
and o2 is handy to have around if you are old like me!

but for most a good 48 inch air mover fan when operating to move the air around when working on this equipment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
^ Ah, you noticed how I fumbled about looking for the throttle lever to pull it back to idle?

Trace amounts of CO messing with my fine motor skills. hahaha

Seriously, that stuff is bad for you.
 

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yup nasty stuff at best!
if it was a diesel it is even worse on the exhaust trash..
that stuff is hard on a person who does service work!

hey they now make cats for small engines!
search blue cat...
the run 300-600 bucks...
but the fumes are way lower...
same when on LP or NG the numbers are lower in the count per hour.

try the test with a night hawk if you can find one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 · (Edited)
I was ready to close the book on this but apparently, this rust bucket is a gift that keeps on giving.

So today, I decided to put it through its paces and ran a small air conditioner as a load. 15-20 minutes in, the engine started to run funny and eventually stalled out. It was a head-scratcher since it started right up after that. But about a minute later, the same thing happened. Taking off the gas cap to see if I've run out of fuel, I can see bubbles in the tank coming up from the fuel line. Vapor lock.

The old fuel line had a split corrugated loom wrapped around it. I thought it was just an anti-abrasion thing but it probably works as a thermal insulator too. The hot air from the engine flows over the fuel line by design so that's probably why it's happening. Time to look for a loom.
 

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The old fuel line had a split corrugated loom wrapped around it. I thought it was just an anti-abrasion thing but it probably works as a thermal insulator too. The hot air from the engine flows over the fuel line by design so that's probably why it's happening. Time to look for a loom.
Maybe you could fabricate a sheet metal shield for it. That might last longer. Just a thought...
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 · (Edited)
Last and final update (one hopes)...

This was the BEFORE shot. The hot air from the engine heats up the fuel line causing it to vapor lock.
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To solve the vapor lock issue, I was contemplating between using a loom insulation around the fuel line or as @GenKnot suggested, use a piece of sheet metal as a heat shield.

I did both.

I covered most of the fuel lines with automotive loom and hacked a sheet metal cover I stole from an old PC power supply.

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What I basically did was deflect the hot air from the engine 90 degrees to the side. Now tell me if that doesn't look OEM to you :cool:. I was meaning to paint it but, I think that'll do for now.

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Hello. Have you removed the motor back cover? Interested in how the wires are connected and whether there is a Voltage Regulator. And in what position do you leave the throttle. I got such a generator as a gift and I can't normally make it work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 · (Edited)
Hello. Have you removed the motor back cover? Interested in how the wires are connected and whether there is a Voltage Regulator. And in what position do you leave the throttle. I got such a generator as a gift and I can't normally make it work.
This is actually unlike many of the more common brushless generators. First of all, the field winding is powered by an excitation coil under the engine flywheel. It does NOT have a capacitor.

I have been unable to open the back end cover on the stator, partly because it’s stuck, but mostly because there’s nothing in there but the windings themselves. The generator head has 6 wires coming out of it... there are two 110V legs, each with its own Hot and Neutral wires, and the 2 wires for the field winding.

The exciter coil in the engine goes to a full-wave rectifier inside the control box. The DC output from the rectifier goes to the field windings (polarity-sensitive).

The main stator windings (4 wires) also goes to the control box where they are broken down to 110V and 220V receptacles.

I am willing to provide more information if you have specific questions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Here's the wiring diagram. There were a few variations of this model with minor wiring and feature changes.

The one I have has the following distinctions:

1. It did not came with the Charging Coil (CC) along with the accompanying 12V DC output terminals
2. It came wired with both 110V and 220V output but I have modified it to only produce 220V, by following the schematic and bridging wires V1 and U2.

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Discussion Starter · #40 · (Edited)
I was hoping to see an "after" of the interior of the fuel tank…
I'd say I got over 90% of the crud out with the muriatic acid and vinegar baths, but without access to Evaporust or similar products, I found it impossible or impractical to clean it any better.

However, since the time it's been put back into service 6 months ago, there had been no rust re-forming and whatever grime is in there now, is stuck in there and doesn't seem to mix with the gas. If and when bits and chunks do somehow get into the fuel line, it will likely just collect in the sediment bowl below the petcock and anything that's suspended in the fuel will be caught by the red inline filter I added.

Right now it's got a few liters of non-ethanol fuel and you can visually see through it right to the bottom.

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Just a reminder that not too long ago, this is what it looked like... a mess of varnish and tar-like substance coating the inside.
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