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Hey all. I have inherited an air compressor from my grandpa and am stuck in identifying the tank and the origin of the compressor itself, and if its worth bringing back to life or scrapping. From what I am told it is military surplus.

What I know:
Engine - Wisconsin MAENLD
Pump - Curtis C-96

Engine runs great after the initial start of the season, pain to get started initially. Pump pumps up to pressure

Tank:
No Idea, but there is a label welded to it containing the following:

NAT'L BD
5272
W&K
U-69 Max WP 200 LBS
U-70 Mad Temp 250 DEG F
Shell 2391 Head 2187
LMG 5272 1945

I have no idea what any of these numbers mean but I would definitely appreciate any information regarding whether I should keep this guy going and in the family or figure something else out!

Thanks
 

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No do not even think about scrapping! This thing is rebuildable. Beautiful machine. I've got one myself. Love it.
 

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I agree with not scrapping it. I have rebuilt my 1988 3 cyl, single stage Curtis Toledo 60 gal. compressor. I am now in process of rebuilding a 1984 60 gal. Buckeye air compressor. 2 stage.
 

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No, do not scrape it ...
It is totally a bad idea about things can be rebuild.
But this is some other kind, so it's better to take guidance from the maintenance and repair engineer.
 

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I think you should take a step back and evaluate your situation clearly.
1) How much you bought it for?
2) How much you could sell it for? Asking around on forum to get a somewhat price
3) Get a repairman coming over to see if it could be restored.

Thinking about this will give you a clearer picture.

Hope this helps,

Jimmy
 

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You should hold on to it! Great Compressor..
 

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The NB tag tells you that it was build and tested to some rigorous specifications and is a good tank. At one time. They get old and rust and stuff.

Be sure you have a safety relief valve on it set for slightly over the max pressure you need. Like 150psig?? Never pump a compressor up to real high pressures if you don't have to.

Curtis C96 was a good old cast iron compressor. Lots of them running out there, parts should be available.

Take the belts off the compressor. See how well the engine starts/runs. Analyze the engine separately. Run a compression check. Look for smoke out muffler. If you judge the engine to be worthy. Put belts on the compressor, make sure there is no pressure in the tank and start up the engine. Go online and look for a formula to figure the CUBIC FEET of the tank, and the C96 proposed cfm output. Then you can see how ling it takes to pump up to 100 psig. That will tell you if the compressor is pumping ok.

You need a check valve in the discharge line of compressor into the tank. And some way to unload the pressure off the line above the check valve so the engine does not have to try to start the compressor with full tank pressure on the compressor. Too much load.

Make sure your oil, filters, belts, etc are up to date as they should be. Compressors use compressor oil. The engine needs oil dependant on if it has an oil pump and filter or is splash lubricated. It is a very good aircooled engine. Worth investing in.

Keep the pressure as low as you can live with. Less wear and tear and danger.
 
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