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The water heater, refrigerator, and the outlet circuits for the wifi and computer systems in my house are wired into a Reliance transfer switch/sub panel which can be fed from a 30 amp plug box outside, where I plug in my trusty old Generac 7200 watt generator during power outages. The genny is of course NOT an inverter type.

I've looked at the output of the generator on my o'scope and on a distortion analyzer, and the output looks fairly clean. It's never damaged any equipment it has powered. I'm just wondering if a little power line conditioning might be a good idea anyway. Anybody out there using anything like that for basic protection? If so, what kind? How's it working for you?
 

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I looked around. One that looked great with meters clearly stated it was not for use on US 220.
Then this one:
It had a four star rating.
 

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avr for the grid as well as generator is a good idea!

it all depends on what you are wanting to protect from
apc makes solutions..
and up to REAL power..
I use the little 1500 and 3000 watt units...
and LARGE battery array.
custom built.

yea surge protection as well on the system here for both grid and gen system
that has saved me from some grief with power pole hits as well as lightning this 2020 year.

I like avr for each device.
big bucks.. but it works.
 

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I use a Surge Guard unit that is popular with the RV crowd to gain some protection from iffy campground power, which is often delivered via old, overloaded and poorly maintained distribution systems. On a number of occasions over the last few decades, the Surge Guard has disconnected my RV from the campground service due to various problems, often related to voltage sags or spikes and wrongly wired or burned out receptacles.

A few years ago I also began using a 50 amp Surge Guard unit to protect my home from problems with the generator due to such things as high or low voltages and such, which can happen when things go bad with the gen-set. The Surge Guard also helps protect the generator from me, too, as more than once I have run out of fuel, and the Surge Guard terminates service as soon as the voltage falls below 102V as the generator falters. I believe this is good for the generator by preventing it from being damaged by the load under such conditions.

The Surge Guard is wired into the generator-to-home circuit via standard L14-30 connectors. The Surge Guard plugs into the generator 240-volt circuit, and my home's entrance panel disconnect switch is plugged into the Surge Guard. The unit terminates service when voltages drop below 102V or rises above 132V on either of the two 120V legs coming off the generator.

It is designed to do other things as well, such as provide protection from surges, reversed polarity, etc.

It's probably a relatively coarse device compared to units designed to finely "condition" power and rid it of various harmonics, but since I have it and use it to protect my RV from errant campground service, it just seems to make sense for me to use it to protect my home from errant generator service as well.
 
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