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I’m planning to get a Honda eu7000 (or possibly a Yamaha 6300) as backup (I’m in Northern California). My main electrical panel is located on the exterior of my house. I have a sub panel inside the house. There is a breaker on the main panel which is labeled “sub panel“. One electrician told me that powering the main panel circuits is no problem but powering the circuits on the sub panel would require running a wire between the two panels at great expense. Another electrician told me that such a wire wasn’t necessary...that both panels could be powered running a wire between them. I’m confused! Is anyone out there familiar with these things? If any additional information needed to answer the question, I can try. Thanks.
 

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Your sub panel is already powered from the main panel so I'm not sure what they are talking about with running another wire to the sub panel. I assume you are looking to power up both panels, therefore powering the main should also power the sub.........Now in order to power your main panel, you need to ensure that the main breaker from the utility company can NOT be switched to it's "on" position while you are powering the house with the generator. Most panel manufacturers make an interlock for this purpose. It is a mechanical lockout type system which forces you to turn off the main breaker in order to turn on the breaker which is connected to your generator. Clear as mud? I am looking to do the same type of thing instead of backfeeding (shhhh) from the garage, so I have been looking at various options. The interlock seems to be the most cost effective so far.
 

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Can you post a picture of your main panel? Is the main strictly a disconnect which in turn feeds the sub panel with all your branch circuits?
 

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Seems like a simple install. Did you have to get the power utility company involved? It may vary by area but I know here we can't pull a meter. Also not the most cost effective.
 

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Seems like a simple install. Did you have to get the power utility company involved? It may vary by area but I know here we can't pull a meter. Also not the most cost effective.
Under normal circumstances, I would have had the power company pull the meter, but a tree came down and tore the whole service off the house. I had to pull the meter off the box to reattach the box and conduit to the house, so I installed the GenerLink while the lines were down and then a line crew came by and hooked up the lines to the house again. The power company has never come back to check it or reseal the meter.

The fact that the install time is only 15 minutes under normal circumstances makes up for the slightly higher equipment cost.

7987
 

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ha ha cool winter event pix tab!
yea not looking forward to this winter with the lock down.
i bet we get ice here in Iowa this year..
we are over due.

yea the generlink is a cool setup for renters as well..
no need to do all that costly stuff that you will have to leave behind when you move unless you are doing natural gas or lp fuel that is not portable.
the only down fall is you have to get to the meter area during an outage..

last big ice event we had here
there was arc flash in my back yard were the electric meter and inlet for the electric utility is located..
ice in the power lines with trees not on my property.
when i called the utility co to report the outage they asked exactly where was the arc coming from.
lol i was not going back there in wet ice!! no way, no how. that is a good way to get dead!

i was able to connect to my gen inlet that is located in the front of the house east side.
sure glad to have a plan!!

a person could leave the generlink cord connected at the meter and route it better to a safe area as well.
zip tie it up or use rubber cov's in the proper size.

yea with the hot we had here the last 3 months i needed to see that ice snow picture!!
grin!!
almost as good as just looking at a glass of ice tea!!
lol.
 

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Even though I live in the "Great White North", we haven't had a major ice event in my area that I can recall, but we can get some pretty nasty weather. I was talking with a neighbor last night and coincidentally he has a GenerLink installed at his house. He paid almost $2k for it though!!! Looks like the same one you linked to but with our requirement for CSA certification, that sometimes drives the prices up.........waaaaay up. Apparently with our utility company, we are entitled to one free disconnect per year so it would really only be the cost of the electrician who comes and "installs" it.
 

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well it depends on how remote you are in the great white north!!
lol!
some of my clients up north you have to fly in to get there...
pipe line guys.
yea that runs prices up if they have to air freight everything in like nome AK.

wish I had the bucks to do a charter service up there!
big dollars running groc and fuel every week in the remote areas...

yea specs on gear is different country to country.
you have to watch that when doing importing of gear.

here is the states we have to watch local city / state code as well as NEC code.
that fire code thing is tricky on generators in most areas...
it changes every year in some areas depending on who is in charge.

we always like to check everything...
most older homes are not up to the latest...
always good to check.
 
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