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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Guys. I picked up an item I've had my eye on for a while. Now I'm unsure how to get it working.

Gadget Audio equipment Font Electronic component Adapter


I saw some of you have this and it flung a craving on me. I'm not sure how to wire it. It has 4 terminals which I presume is for the ring sensor and some kind of power input. Below is a diagram but I'm not sure what it means. How does the unit get power? And what's the light bulb all about?

Rectangle Line Font Parallel Diagram


It looks like the top and bottom screws are hot and the two in the middle are neutral? Am I reading that right?

Looks like a really cool little unit, if I can figure out how to use it.
 

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The top two wires are for the current transformer (CT), which is included in the package. The CT is looped around the hot wire going to the load side and which the current you want measured.

The bottom two wires provides AC power to the monitor, where it also samples the voltage, frequency, and together with the current read by the CT, allows it to compute the wattage, energy consumption, and power factor.

I use something similar mounted on a DIN rail.... similar wiring setup.

 

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I have 2 of that same monitor la swamp. I have one complaint with that unit. If it mounted on a wall above or below your eye line the screen is difficult to read. But the split CT makes it a bit easier to install.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
So... how do I wire it up for power? Do I just use a power cord with bare leads? I can't tell polarity from the diagram, unless red is hot or it doesn't matter.

I'm looking forward to trying it out. I figured it would be good for when I'm running on generator power.
 

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For my use case, I use it to monitor the output from the generator while the CT is looped around one of the AC wire from the generator. So the meter is only active while the generator is running.

In the diagram you provided, just replace the outlet/receptacle with the generator and the light bulb with the load side going to your home.

For all intents and purposes, the meter just taps to your existing wiring. Hot and Neutral orientation won't matter with this meter. Even the CT can be clamped on either Hot or Neutral... it will still work the same way. But for illustration, I assumed red to be Hot and blue to be Neutral. I think some consistency is in order. The CT is is non-polarized so I colored both wires black and it can be clamped any which way you want.

In the diagram, it's measuring the current passing through the Hot (red) wire.

 

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make sure to use an bakolite inline glass fuse holder with a 1 amp @ 250 vac glass fuse on the power feed for this unit.
pm if you need details on the wiring.
i like to use 4 of the meters.
one set for the L1 and L2 on the grid or line side
and one set for the generator L1 and L2

and place an inline switch for the power feed after the fuse holders so you can turn off the display to save life on the display.

i also use led power indicators after the fuse holders as lights to indicate if the grid has power as well as the gen feed.
it makes checking things easy at a glance and a couple of flicks of switches.

and it sure helps to see the load as well as the voltage at the same time all at a glance.
i like the meters on top of the interlock breaker panel in a hoffman box.
pm for the build instructions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
For portability, would it be possible to use a cord with a standard 120 VAC plug rather than hard-wiring it onto a specific generator? I'm presuming the unit will run off of a 120 VAC source?
 

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There are 1,001 ways to skin a cat.

If you're monitoring anything that doesn't use up more than 15A on a single 120V leg, you can make do with a Kill A Watt.

Otherwise, you will need to build a box for the 6-in-1 power monitor. It can be installed in-circuit (ie. appropriate plug, cable, and receptacle built-in) that you insert between the generator and the load, or probably something like in the video below.

 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I was shooting for a less permanent way to mount the unit. Does the unit itself run on 120 VAC? If it does, would getting a small power cord from the hardware store work for providing power to the unit? It seems like that would work.
 

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As mentioned if you planning to monitor current from a standard household 5-15/5-20 outlet a killawatt is a much easier plan. If you are planning to monitor the a 30amp 120v or 30 amp 120/240v connection you’ll need a box to house the monitor(s) with appropriate connectors to place the box in line with the power cord.

Just for reference what I built to house it.

Light Medical equipment Audio equipment Gas Gadget
 

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Hi Guys. I picked up an item I've had my eye on for a while. Now I'm unsure how to get it working.

View attachment 10498

I saw some of you have this and it flung a craving on me. I'm not sure how to wire it. It has 4 terminals which I presume is for the ring sensor and some kind of power input. Below is a diagram but I'm not sure what it means. How does the unit get power? And what's the light bulb all about?

View attachment 10499

It looks like the top and bottom screws are hot and the two in the middle are neutral? Am I reading that right?

Looks like a really cool little unit, if I can figure out how to use it.
Yeah, what they said, I think..
Now I'm really confused.
Doesn't bthe kil a watt just plug in and then you just plug in whatever appliance you're trying to monitor ?

Cause I would really like to know what this refrigerator is using with all the action going inside, defrost, icemaker etc, not just the max amps for the compressor.
I'll keep following here......
 

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So... how do I wire it up for power? Do I just use a power cord with bare leads? I can't tell polarity from the diagram, unless red is hot or it doesn't matter.

I'm looking forward to trying it out. I figured it would be good for when I'm running on generator power.
I happened to have 2 of these sitting in my fun drawer and broke them out when my neighbor was connecting up his generator.
1st off. If you plan on measuring the full output of a generator….you’ll need 2 of these. One for each hot leg. Then manually add up the power from each leg for the total power. What’s good about seeing each leg is you can easily imbalance a generator depending on what 120v loads are connected. All the 240 loads balance them selves as they pull from each leg. Anyway. With 2 installed you can see what each side of your panel is drawing.

im Uncertain of your setup but we installed the units close to the electrical panel where the coils could be installed over the hot legs coming in from the generator inlet plug.
Went to Home Depot and found a double gang metal box that both of them could fit in and make a cover from some flat plastic to fit the gang box.

These do have to be powered so we pulled the power from a spare 120 volt breaker he had in the panel.

Technically speaking if you wanted to be really picky you could power each from the same side of the panel as where you pull power using a double pole breaker which would show you the voltage of each leg separately but that’s kind of overkill. Would have to assume that a reasonably balanced generator load would have equal voltage per leg.
If he was home I’d walk over and grab a few pictures. But. Away for TG.

if you want a non powere version. Reliance sell a watt meter fir a generator . 2 coils and a analog meter but works great…though more expensive than the option you’re looking at…even when you need 2 of them.
 

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I happened to have 2 of these sitting in my fun drawer and broke them out when my neighbor was connecting up his generator.
1st off. If you plan on measuring the full output of a generator….you’ll need 2 of these. One for each hot leg. Then manually add up the power from each leg for the total power. What’s good about seeing each leg is you can easily imbalance a generator depending on what 120v loads are connected. All the 240 loads balance them selves as they pull from each leg. Anyway. With 2 installed you can see what each side of your panel is drawing.

im Uncertain of your setup but we installed the units close to the electrical panel where the coils could be installed over the hot legs coming in from the generator inlet plug.
Went to Home Depot and found a double gang metal box that both of them could fit in and make a cover from some flat plastic to fit the gang box.

These do have to be powered so we pulled the power from a spare 120 volt breaker he had in the panel.

Technically speaking if you wanted to be really picky you could power each from the same side of the panel as where you pull power using a double pole breaker which would show you the voltage of each leg separately but that’s kind of overkill. Would have to assume that a reasonably balanced generator load would have equal voltage per leg.
If he was home I’d walk over and grab a few pictures. But. Away for TG.

if you want a non powere version. Reliance sell a watt meter fir a generator . 2 coils and a analog meter but works great…though more expensive than the option you’re looking at…even when you need 2 of them.
 

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I was shooting for a less permanent way to mount the unit. Does the unit itself run on 120 VAC? If it does, would getting a small power cord from the hardware store work for providing power to the unit? It seems like that would work.
You don't need any power cord for this meter. It is powered by the circuit where you are installing it. What specifically are you trying to do? Connect to the power outlet of your generator? .
 

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I was shooting for a less permanent way to mount the unit. Does the unit itself run on 120 VAC? If it does, would getting a small power cord from the hardware store work for providing power to the unit? It seems like that would work.
Maybe this makes it clearer. Here is an example of one I installed in a disconnect box to measure power consumption for a heat pump.
 

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You don't need any power cord for this meter. It is powered by the circuit where you are installing it. What specifically are you trying to do? Connect to the power outlet of your generator? .
That’s not quite correct. You do have to power it. The hot line from the generator runs through the coil but that is only to measure the current draw. You still need to power the digital circuit. Clearly the power will come from the generator but you do have to connect to 120 ( hot and neutral ) somewhere.
 

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That’s not quite correct. You do have to power it. The hot line from the generator runs through the coil but that is only to measure the current draw. You still need to power the digital circuit. Clearly the power will come from the generator but you do have to connect to 120 ( hot and neutral ) somewhere.
True, it is powered. Maybe I misunderstood the OP, but he seemed to question if he needed to get a cord from the hardware store and plug it into an outlet somewhere.
 
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