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I live in the country so when the power goes off it stays off which means i have no water as i have a well, heat, ac or anything since everything is powered by electricity. I've been wanting to get a electrician to install a Transfer Switch and i'm here looking for ideas from the pros.

I don't know if i should get a 50 or 30 amp manual transfer switch or something else what are your suggestions? My current generator does 5500 watts and has a 30 amp port that i run into the house and plug in whatever i want powered it's a huge pain with all the cords.

I had to buy this generator without any research as i had been without power for two days and all the stores where sold out of everything power related within 100 miles, i just happen to be at home depo when a truck full of generators pulled in it was crazy. Lost power for a week!

I have been looking at 11,500 generators and i see that they have a 30 amp and a 50 amp plug, i'm not sure if they are meant to be used at the same time. My only option is gas power.

Thanks in advanced.
 

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yea power out is not a fun thing...
all though most folks can get by with less if they plan a bit.
what area of the usa are we working with?
below is a link to my site with a few ideas...
click here for the generator section
i always like the larger inlets...
think 50 amp inlet with 6/4 wire....
and there are several inlets that work for that as well.
I like the marinco inlet twist lock system for the new systems we are doing for 2020 and 2021 season.
they are pricy but they work real good!
click here all of the links are on this page
I always go for the good materials and do it once on the projects and leave room for expansion.
and if you have the larger inlet it will make it easy to go to the larger gen set when needed.
or you can drop back to a small gen set just for a few lights etc.

a few things to do;
plan the system, decide how much power you need for summer and for winter.
led lights are a good thing.
insulate the heck out of everything with r52 or more.
a generator shack is a good thing to work towards in the big plan.
make sure the system is an easy to setup for when the power go's out.
make an easy instruction sheet for the setup.

optional things that work are UPS systems for the things like wifi
they work off battery for short term power out.
automatic emergency battery lights in the main hallways and in the generator setup area.
these days you can find used ones for not much money and rebuild them with led.
I have 4 of them in my small setup.

quiet generators are nice.. noise carry's in a quiet place...
I prefer the honda inverter series of generators.
honda eu2200i for smaller current needs and they work well for camping or state fair time too.and yes you can run 4 of these all at the same time with a custom inlet setup.
click here for the page for the honda eu2200i 4 generator inlet
honda eu7000is for medium current needs and you can run 2 of these to get you the 14kw peak and 10kw run power.

the hondas are an investment.. but they hold value well!
 

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@chris1976 :
Your question about which transfer switch to pick says one thing. It takes just as log to install a 50 amp TS as it does a 30 amp TS. The difference in the initial TS cost is very little. If I were you I would go for the 50 amp.
As for the pick of which brand to choose: In the past 50+ years there have been many good generators to choose from. There was Onan, Briggs Stratton, Generac, Honda and many others. Today there are untold numbers of brands. I think you are wise to seek info before you replace your generator.
The nation's largest producer is Generac, but that does not mean they are top of the line, just that they have the lead. I have had Briggs Stratton back in the early 90's. It is still working. I then bought a 14 KW standby Generac that gave up the ghost in 10 years. I did buy another Generac due to complications of replacing the old one. I presently have a 1985 $4400.00 model ES6500 Honda tri fuel sitting as a stand by unit, but I can loan it if needed. I have to agree with Iowagold, the Honda has merits when it comes to "Top of the line", but you pay for that ease of mind.
Recently I was on Craigslist.com looking for generators. There are so many different brands that are being sold there I had no idea that so many were being made.
Choose wisely, and keep the little one, you may can help a neighbor in need.
 

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I don't know if i should get a 50 or 30 amp manual transfer switch or something else what are your suggestions? My current generator does 5500 watts and has a 30 amp port that i run into the house and plug in whatever i want powered it's a huge pain with all the cords.
If you don't plan to go larger than 30A = 7200W @ 240V, then just go with the 30A transfer switch (I recommend GenerLink meter-mounted units based on my experience). They also make a 40A unit that can actually support 45A = 10,800W @ 240V, which is what I have.
I have been looking at 11,500 generators and i see that they have a 30 amp and a 50 amp plug, i'm not sure if they are meant to be used at the same time.
If those are 11,500W surge, then the larger GenerLink would do it. If it's 11,500W Continuous, you'll need an actual 50A or more likely a 60A transfer switch.
 
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