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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all,

New to the forum. Anyways I was wondering based on my attached pictures of someone could let me know what size generator I would need to power my house. The house has a seperates breaker box and plug for generator use if power goes out.

Thanks for the help. Hope it explained it the right way
 

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well the transfer switch will stand for 50 amps
so a few other questions.
what is your location?
city or out on the stix?
do you have natural gas or liquid propane at the house?

are you wanting to look at longer run times?
or short term?

any noise limitations?
are you located in the city or burbs or miles to neighbors?

do you want a perminate automatic generator or a temporary (role out when you need it)

whew!
ya there should be more too.
but that is a start!
most of us have several choices..

for me i went the honda choice.
I have 4 eu2200i generators and one eu7000is.
yea the honda is best in class on the fuel.
so i went the tri fuel choice.
added the kits.
a few bucks more but i have choices for fuel just in case things get real bad.

right now primary fuel is natural gas.
in my location it is low cost and i do not have to have it in storage.

so on to the gens.
winter time i can get by with under 1000 watts.
that is furnace fridge freezer lights tv's etc.

summer is a differant story..
ac units!
so i can add 2 to 3 gens to get the power i need.
custom system for sure!
see the link below for info;
click here for the honda generator section with pix and links for parts
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Wow thanks for the indepth response. Currently I live in Florida. Close by to neighbors but I only plan on running it when the power goes out from hurricanes. There is a completely separate generator plug on the outside of the garage that goes to the breaker box I posted a picture of. I only really need to power whatever that breaker box is hooked up to, water heater, master bedroom, refrigerator. Just the bare minimum. I just wasn't sure if there was any information in those pictures that would signify the minimum size generator I would need to power what's listed in the picture. Thanks so much for your time
 

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If you can eliminate the water heater, you could get by on a 3500W with some room to spare, which is what most folks do. The water heater kicks you up into a much larger unit with correspondingly larger fuel consumption. Probably 10,000W. That's "assuming" that the rooms listed don't have window AC or they're smaller ones. You should make a realistic review of what you need to weather an outage and plan from there. What the previous owner thought was OK may not work for your family. Talk to your neighbors and find out the "usual" outage duration to factor in to your outage plans. We had a 13 day outage due to an Inland Hurricane (Ohio) and got by with a 3500W unit powering an upright freezer, Frig, misc. lights, TV's, computers. Other than cold showers it was OK.
I didn't see an electric range? Figure out what your family would need to survive the "usual" outage duration which will determine the size unit. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Ok awesome. Thank you for the response. I'm assuming if I wanted to add or remove anything from the current setup, I would have to consult an electrician?
 

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gas stove and gas water heater is a nice alt power! lp or ng.
some have both electric and gas so they can choose the power source!
and that makes the demand on the generator system way lower.

for me i have good natural gas to the house, so i even have the choice of running the generators on natural gas!
 

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If you're not comfortable working inside the load center (breaker box) and electrically "handy," yes you'd need an electrician. Alternately, if $$ are a concern you could run an extension cord from a generator powered room, e.g.. "Master BR" to another room to provide power there. The gen connection you have is designed so you don't have to trip over extension cords in an outage, but whether you want to reconfigure that for your needs is a function of how many and duration of "usual" outages in your area and how much you want to spend. Your gen connection has a three position switch for each circuit, "gen" "off" and "line." Normal power you leave everything on "line." when gen is connected and running you switch only the circuits you want powered to "gen." e.g. If you decide you can live without the water heater, just leave it on "line" and the gen will never see it.

You can invest a lot of money in a genset and associated wiring, the key is how often will it be used? My brother who lives nearby got along very well with an 8Kw unit for outages, then the 13 day outage occurred. He has two daughters who were in high school at the time. I live a mile away and I could hear the screaming when they discovered there was no hot water for showers, particularly the hot oil treatments (?) for their hair. He now has a whole house Generac with auto everything. The girls are through college and gone now, the longest outage we've experienced since was 18 hours.

Good luck,
 
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