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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys!
I just bought my first compressor the other day from the home depot, It’s a 30 Gallon (vertical) Husky 135 PSI 2HP Air Compressor (single stage belt driven) AKA Campbell Hausfeld,
So far I like the compressor very much and am very pleased with the quality only thing I that bothered me was the plastic belt guard rattled so I put some High temp rubber bushings in problem areas and now the rattles are gone and is very quiet :)
I was going to go with the 60 Gallon Husky but my garage is wired only for 120 V and not 220 V and I can’t justify wiring a 220 V as I’ll be moving out of state and I really only “Need” the compressor for painting my Jeep (In Pieces I.E, Fenders, Hood, Doors, Tailgate all separate) plus the 30 Gallon is portable

Now I need some help understanding what can be done to belt driven Pump’s as far as upgrades go,
Since this pump is a belt style pump that mounts to a bracket welded on-top of the tank is it common for people to upgrade their pumps after the standard pump and/or motor dies?
For Example If I find a 2-Stage belt driven pump that came from another 2 HP Compressor that puts out more CFM then my single stage is it not possible to mount that pump in place of a single stage belt Driven pump for faster recovery times?

Also I’m pretty sure this isn’t a good idea but I gotta ask,
Is putting a Higher HP Motor to drive the standard pump bad? I would think so as it would just create more heat in the pump causing premature failure right?

My Compressor is just fine as it is and operates my spray gun very well but sometime in the future when the pump breaks one day do I have options beyond Stock replacements?
 

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If you really want a more powerful compressor buy one. Changing the motors will make no changes unless you change the pulley sizes and in that case you will turn the pump to fast which will lead to an early death for the pump. Any change to anything like you are suggesting will require you go to 220 volts. The compressor you have will more than likely last 20 years with minimum maintenance so leave your Tim the Toolman desires to your Jeep. Roger
 

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If you really want a more powerful compressor buy one. Changing the motors will make no changes unless you change the pulley sizes and in that case you will turn the pump to fast which will lead to an early death for the pump. Any change to anything like you are suggesting will require you go to 220 volts. The compressor you have will more than likely last 20 years with minimum maintenance so leave your Tim the Toolman desires to your Jeep. Roger
:rolleyes:

I don’t think you fully comprehend the question here as my main question being if pumps can be swapped out from similar compressor’s and not upgrading the motor only as I fully understand upgrading a motor requires more Volts andjust means more heat in the pump

I find it hard to believe something like this is black and white because in the end all it is an electric motor running a pump that pushes air into a tank until a preset PSI rating cuts power to the motor

So let me re-phrase my hypothetical question.

If and when my pump dies and I find a pump in this case a 2 stage belt driven pump that was run with the same HP requirements as the one I have, Could I not in theory fab up a 2 stage pump with the same diameter wheel that moves more air in the pump faster for quicker recovery times, in place of the single stage pump?

Honestly I don’t see why not :confused:

I have my reasons for buying a 30 Gallon compressor over the 60 and it does everything I need it to do. My questions are for curiosity’s sake so I don’t want to hear buy a bigger one. I want to hear No you’re insane or yeah sure why not :D
 

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You'll never wear the pump or the motor out. But, you can mount any size pump you desire, however, you will also have to have the horsepower to drive it. There is no free lunch here. More air? More horsepower.
 

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It sounded like a Tim the Toolman question but as I said with minimum care the compressor and pump should last 20 years. The biggest reason compressors fail is the tank rusts out from not bleeding the water out of it regularly. If used a lot you should do that at least once a month. I have 3 compressors. A stationary mounted in my garage that I built/put together myself. I also have two portables. One gasoline powered and the other electric powered. All of them a 20+ years old and surviving at this point in time. The only one that required repair is the gas powered one because the tank rusted out and leaked. I did replace the tank because I had access to a tank but it might have been easier/cheaper to replace the whole unit. As far as single vs two stage pumps as said above a two requires considerably more HP and for what one of those pumps costs with the correct motor even from Harbor Freight you are more than 1/2 way to getting a new compressor that will also include a new tank. Could you do it of. Of course you could. Its your time and money to do as you see fit with. Roger
 

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If the new pump requires the same HP as the old one, sure you can exchange it. (given that you run it at the right speed.)

But double capacity (cfpm) at the same pressure would give you double HP requirement.

If the new pump is double the CFPM and the same HP, it probably is half the pressure.

If you run any pump outside it's designed speed or pressure, you waiting can surely wait for an early breakdown!

Pawon
 
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