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If I post a list of equipment I need to power in case of an emergencey power outtage, could someone help point me in the right direction of how big a generator I need? Bare with me, I am new to this....
 

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If you just need to run a few household essentials, like a fridge, a few lights, a fan, TV, etc., then a 2000-3000 watt generator would do fine. You can always unplug the fridge for the short time you might need to run a microwave or toaster oven.

Now if your home has a sump-pump, check to see if it's a 120V or 240V model. If it's 240V, then you'll need to step up to probably a 4000-6000 watt generator to get the 240V power to run the pump.

Finally, if your only need is for emergency power, then any generator is better than none. However, if you think you might use it for camping or other uses, where it might get used more frequently, then strongly consider getting a high-quality and super quiet generator. You'll be glad in the long run, and the pain of a high price only hurts once, while the misery of poor quality and unreliable operation lasts forever.

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Caveat: I work for Honda, but the preceding was my opinion alone.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for posting. I was thrown into a facilities roll at my job and I have been tasked to find a generator that will support 3 refrigerators, 3 freezers and an incubator. I have all the voltage and amp readings:

Fridge 1 - 115V, 60Hz, 5A
Fridge 2 & 3 are identical - 115V, 60Hz, 9.1A

Freezer 1 - 115V, 60Hz, 5A
Freezer 2 - 120V, 60Hz, 16A (this is a -80 freezer)
Freezer 3 - 115V, 60Hz, 12A (this is a -20 freezer)

Incubator - 115V, 60Hz, 5A
 

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VA=W
volts times amps =watts

fridge 1) 115 X 5 = 575

Add all the watts together and that will be your answer.
 

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Thanks for posting. I was thrown into a facilities roll at my job and I have been tasked to find a generator that will support 3 refrigerators, 3 freezers and an incubator. I have all the voltage and amp readings:

Fridge 1 - 115V, 60Hz, 5A
Fridge 2 & 3 are identical - 115V, 60Hz, 9.1A

Freezer 1 - 115V, 60Hz, 5A
Freezer 2 - 120V, 60Hz, 16A (this is a -80 freezer)
Freezer 3 - 115V, 60Hz, 12A (this is a -20 freezer)

Incubator - 115V, 60Hz, 5A
Single phase motors have a very low power factor an high % of slip. All Small single phase generators (except Military) are rated at a power factor of unity (1.0) only. To use the std wattage equations w/o also using the effect of power factor change is a fried gen-set in the making. It's hard to answer the question above, w/o knowing the exact unit (Brand) your looking at. I'm assuming (based on the -80 unit) you need a quality machine for either life safety or a monitory issue. Therefore, I'd suggest a 10KW unit an make sure you balance the load equally also. The load will have to be stepped on even with a 10 KW, if you went with a 15, you could dump it all on at once. Starting motors is much different than running them, an single phase motors are the worst of the bunch. If you want to run the numbers yourself, I'd guess your running PF at .86 lagging, with a starting PF of 0.3-4 Hope this helps. Kenneth
 

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Totally agree with the fact that searching online for the latest generators is the best way to purchase one at best price. There are several websites online which manufactures generators of best quality. Hence, searching online is the best way to buy one for your home or office.
 
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