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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a Energizer (EFI) inverter generator 6.5 kw. It can take up to 5 minutes for the 'ready' light to come on when the generator is starting cold (colder than 50 degrees or so). If it is warm outside (75 degrees or so) or it has previously run the light comes on within a minute or less. The manufacturer said that 5 minutes on cold is a little long and should take no longer than a minute or two, but just to keep an eye on it for now. My question is, since this is my first inverter generator has anyone else experienced this delay with these types of generators? Thanks
 

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Is this thing brand new? In other words….is it broken in, properly with moderate loads? Had the oil changed from new? Or…it has lotsa hours and is now running different from new? We need some more info….
 

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Yamahas wont idle down in eco mode for a short time. No other inverter generator I know of has a built in output timer for warm up.

Are you starting the generator with the eco switch on?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Is this thing brand new? In other words….is it broken in, properly with moderate loads? Had the oil changed from new? Or…it has lotsa hours and is now running different from new? We need some more info….
It was properly broken in according to manufacturer instructions and now has around 50 hours on it and is a year and a half old. The oil has been changed regular, always with synthetic. It was never really used in colder weather before, so this could be related to that. Its never powered up or shut down in eco mode. Like I mentioned above, if it is warm, or in warmer weather there is no delay for the inverter to start producing power.
 

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Just spit-balling...

Maybe it has something to do with the oil? I'm thinking that it's probably too viscous when cold and the engine can't get up to the right RPM and/or can't warm-up soon enough to satisfy the controller logic to turn on the output power.

What oil are you using and its viscosity and when was it last changed?
 

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Just spit-balling...

Maybe it has something to do with the oil? I'm thinking that it's probably too viscous when cold and the engine can't get up to the right RPM and/or can't warm-up soon enough to satisfy the controller logic to turn on the output power.

What oil are you using and its viscosity and when was it last changed?
Is it possible for an oil to create so much parasitic drag that would slow the engine down that much? If you used gear oil, I guess it could happen. Although it would explain why temperatures would be a factor when it happens.
 

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Is it possible for an oil to create so much parasitic drag that would slow the engine down that much? If you used gear oil, I guess it could happen. Although it would explain why temperatures would be a factor when it happens.
It's not outside the realm of possibility. If you somehow still have summer monograde oil in there, that can get just a little bit more viscous in the cold.
 

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LOL!
and is connected to the "do hickie"
if you knew the sensor parameters you could use a resistor to fudge the read out numbers,

we have to do that on GM alot.
a thermo gun or cooking thermometer
a bit of warm water in a cup
and another cup with hot water
graph the sensors ohms to temp.

you could use a switch and a fixed resister to set the temp to a mid range readout.
then after an hour worth of run switch it to the oem sensor.
it may want the oem sensor for cold start up
then switch to the the fixed.
and after an hour of run switch back to the oem.

have you replaced the sensor?
it could be bad intermittent or out of spec as well.
 

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It's not outside the realm of possibility. If you somehow still have summer monograde oil in there, that can get just a little bit more viscous in the cold.
I have a 1922 Model T Ford and the required oil is straight 30 non-detergent. When it gets down below freezing, neither my arm on the crank nor the original 6V starting motor stand a chance of getting it started... Feels like molasses in there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
It has nothing to do with oil viscosity. It’s an EFI engine so either it has oddball programming or a junky temp sensor. “ENGIE CYLINDER TEMOERATURE SENSOR” 😂The typos are both awful and hilarious.

View attachment 10487
This makes sense. The EFI engine starts right up and runs, regardless of outside temp. It doesn't sound like its bogged down or having any RPM issues at colder temps. The delay however IS dependent on the outside air temperature. We have been doing some experimenting and the colder the temperature the longer the delay and vice versa. The status lights stay completely off until a certain point and then they cycle through and go green and then power output starts. If I can find the temp sensor on the block I may trying warming it up and see if that helps to isolate the problem. Unit is still under warranty so wish me luck trying to get it serviced. Also, you're right, the typos are friggin scary :LOL:
 
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