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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone, do you guys know what is this? Maybe it's a safety valve? (Figure 1-A and figure 1-B). Because the pressure switcher has one way. I guess near this thing there was the pressure gauge of the tank once. I need to buy the gauges as well. The gauge of tank has a bigger scale, right? Like this:
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While the other pressure gaunge, for outcoming air (?), is smaller and has a smaller scale, right? Like this:
Gauge Measuring instrument Circle Motor vehicle Font

But fondamentally they do the same thing, I could also put two equal gauges, it will be the same, am I right?

Thanks in advance.
 

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Netrap,

I don't know but it looks like an adjustable safety release valve to prevent over pressure of the tank and catastrophic rupture. Modern safety valves usually have a pull ring and are preset for single or double stage compressors. The tank "working pressure, on a tag or stamped on the tank will tell you what pressure safety valve to buy. modern aftermarket manifolds come with one, for liability reasons I guess.
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Stephen
 

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Netrap,

Do not remove it unless you are going to replace it with another safety valve somewhere. It doesn't have to be in the same place but needs access to all of the tank pressure.

Stephen
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hi Stevon, thanks for reply. I removed the paint that was covering the tag, so now I know the manufacture's name. GIANESI. There are also other informations stamped on the tank, and they are: B107 43 • 1 • 10 • 1968 • 12 I think B107 43 is the tank model, 1.10.1968 is the date (dd.mm.yyyy), and 12... I have no idea, maybe the pressure? 12 Bar? Isn't that too much? And other 5 numbers that I think it's the registration number.
I also think it's a safety valve, but on the moderns one there is a "ring" where you can put your finger inside and pull to release the air. But this one it can be pulled or pushed, is it possible that this is an automatic safety valve? There is a spring inside and I think it's possible to regulate it, maybe it's just like the pressure switch, when the tank reaches the same pressure at which the safety valve was set, it is automatically activated by releasing the air. I'm not an expert, just guessing, is this possible? Or maybe it's just stucked, but it looks fixed to me. Tomorrow I'll try to remove it and see how it works. So If I want to put a modern manual safety valve, assuming that that one is automatic, can I change my one way pressure switch with a four ways pressure switch? Mine is like this:
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Can I use this?
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If I will install this, do I have to remove the tank manometer mounted to the pressure switch, and put a screw instead? Or can I have both?

Thanks in advance.
 

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netrap,

You can have both. I don't know what those numbers stamped mean me being in the US, I know that 12 bar is equal to 175 psi so you would be safe with a safety valve of 150 to 175 psi, they come in standard ranges in the US for single stage compressor tanks (150 to 175 psi) and 200 psi for two stage compressor tanks. They never are used unless there is a motor control failure and tank is pumped up beyond the "safety" or "rated" value. You can install safety valve in the tank manifold or a bung on the tank. Single stage compressors generally only go up to 150 PSI max or 10.3 bar and they don't produce as much CFM at that high pressure.
Take the plugs out of the manifold and at least install the safety valve, a gauge is optional in another port.

Stephen

Hi Stevon, thanks for reply. I removed the paint that was covering the tag, so now I know the manufacture's name. GIANESI. There are also other informations stamped on the tank, and they are: B107 43 • 1 • 10 • 1968 • 12 I think B107 43 is the tank model, 1.10.1968 is the date (dd.mm.yyyy), and 12... I have no idea, maybe the pressure? 12 Bar? Isn't that too much? And other 5 numbers that I think it's the registration number.
I also think it's a safety valve, but on the moderns one there is a "ring" where you can put your finger inside and pull to release the air. But this one it can be pulled or pushed, is it possible that this is an automatic safety valve? There is a spring inside and I think it's possible to regulate it, maybe it's just like the pressure switch, when the tank reaches the same pressure at which the safety valve was set, it is automatically activated by releasing the air. I'm not an expert, just guessing, is this possible? Or maybe it's just stucked, but it looks fixed to me. Tomorrow I'll try to remove it and see how it works. So If I want to put a modern manual safety valve, assuming that that one is automatic, can I change my one way pressure switch with a four ways pressure switch? Mine is like this: View attachment 11676

Can I use this?
View attachment 11677
If I will install this, do I have to remove the tank manometer mounted to the pressure switch, and put a screw instead? Or can I have both?

Thanks in advance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hi, thanks for the reply, I ordered the parts from Aliexpress, so I have to wait now, but I think I'll need your help with the electric engine cables' scheme. Thank you all.
 

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netrap,

You don't have to replace the pressure controller, just add the manifold part, they are cheap:


Stephen


Hi Stevon, thanks for reply. I removed the paint that was covering the tag, so now I know the manufacture's name. GIANESI. There are also other informations stamped on the tank, and they are: B107 43 • 1 • 10 • 1968 • 12 I think B107 43 is the tank model, 1.10.1968 is the date (dd.mm.yyyy), and 12... I have no idea, maybe the pressure? 12 Bar? Isn't that too much? And other 5 numbers that I think it's the registration number.
I also think it's a safety valve, but on the moderns one there is a "ring" where you can put your finger inside and pull to release the air. But this one it can be pulled or pushed, is it possible that this is an automatic safety valve? There is a spring inside and I think it's possible to regulate it, maybe it's just like the pressure switch, when the tank reaches the same pressure at which the safety valve was set, it is automatically activated by releasing the air. I'm not an expert, just guessing, is this possible? Or maybe it's just stucked, but it looks fixed to me. Tomorrow I'll try to remove it and see how it works. So If I want to put a modern manual safety valve, assuming that that one is automatic, can I change my one way pressure switch with a four ways pressure switch? Mine is like this: View attachment 11676

Can I use this?
View attachment 11677
If I will install this, do I have to remove the tank manometer mounted to the pressure switch, and put a screw instead? Or can I have both?

Thanks in advance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hi, thank for reply. I watched the video, pretty easy, but I don't have that water tool, just a normal flexible tube, beside this I don't have yet the manometer for the tank. Now I'm removing all the external rust and is not that bad, there is not heavy rust, in some area the are some deeper zones, but they are not that bad. It would be batter removing the rust with a sandblaster but I don't have one, and this is the only compressor I have so I'm cleaning the thank manually and with a grinder. I will use a primer rust converter before painting it, so I'll block the remained rust. I don't get why you suggested to buy a manifold part, I have the pressure controller, it's old but it's in a good shape. This is not my compressor, but is very very similar, and the pressure controller is almost identical. I noticed that the inside of the thank is very dirty, maybe rusty, any advice how to deep clean it? Another thing, the max pressure of the tank is 12 bar, that means I have to set the pressure switch lower than that, like 10 bar, right? Or I have to calculate also the engine power? That is 1 HP. Maybe the engine is not power enough to reach 10 Bar? Thanks in advance.
 

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netrap,

Tanks rust from inside, that's what I worry about. I restored an older tank my self and used this "rust Destroyer" in spray cans for outside of my tank, haven't pressure tested my tank either (probably should have). I just tapped around with a small hammer and listened. I think a 10 bar safety valve will work for you, just remember not to pump up to 10 bar, set your cutoff pressure to less on electrical pressure regulator. Single stage pumps generally work best at a top pressure setting of 135 psi cutoff,10 bar is 150psi and no point going up to that. At 10 bar pressure, the pump demands the most HP and that will show with the highest maximum amps drawn, you will see this with an ammeter. Physics doesn't lie, to produce a given HP from an electric motor, amps over voltage reveals the real HP generated. If your motor plate says FLA is 6 amps at 230 volt then you have a 1 HP motor. Say your load is 1 HP, 6 amps will be drawn on any motor at that load. Even if you are using a 1/2 HP motor with a 1 HP load 6 amps will be demanded on the motor and motor will try to provide that but it will overheat/stall and if not turned off will burn out the wiring inside or trip the thermal overload. If an overloaded motor starts stalling, it will start to draw even more current until something gives, circuit breaker, thermal overload, wires burning etc. That's why you need to have a nameplate stating the FLA. that rating tells you what a given motor can produce in actual HP and where you dare not go beyond for more than a few seconds. An ammeter tells you what is going on and what limits you are crossing or not crossing, a very useful tool. Lets say the driven pulley is too large, this would increase the pump rpm which requires more HP. So this would demand more HP from the motor seen as current draw. Lets say that now 10 amps are seen on your 1 HP motor, that means that the load requires a 2HP motor and is demanding that from your motor. We see with an ammeter what is going on and that overheating, tripping breaker, motor stalling would make sense in that scenario. We can conclude that the chosen drive size pulley is suspect

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Stephen

Hi, thank for reply. I watched the video, pretty easy, but I don't have that water tool, just a normal flexible tube, beside this I don't have yet the manometer for the tank. Now I'm removing all the external rust and is not that bad, there is not heavy rust, in some area the are some deeper zones, but they are not that bad. It would be batter removing the rust with a sandblaster but I don't have one, and this is the only compressor I have so I'm cleaning the thank manually and with a grinder. I will use a primer rust converter before painting it, so I'll block the remained rust. I don't get why you suggested to buy a manifold part, I have the pressure controller, it's old but it's in a good shape. This is not my compressor, but is very very similar, and the pressure controller is almost identical. I noticed that the inside of the thank is very dirty, maybe rusty, any advice how to deep clean it? Another thing, the max pressure of the tank is 12 bar, that means I have to set the pressure switch lower than that, like 10 bar, right? Or I have to calculate also the engine power? That is 1 HP. Maybe the engine is not power enough to reach 10 Bar? Thanks in advance.
 
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