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simi conductors or a hot spot in the winding.
over time those show up as power sag when the rpm is rock solid.

kinda surprised it is not driving the gov nutz.
if it is super bad the gov will surge speed to compensate for low voltage.
but then again it maybe HZ based only gov.
I don't know a lot about it, other than it's probably from around the time of Hurricane Katrina. So, it's pretty old in generator years. It'd be nice to be able to fix it and get it working properly, but I have no idea what's wrong with it or what would be involved with getting it right again. Is there an easy fix for something like that? Of course, I guess we'd have to figure out what the issue is before determining how practical it is to repair it. My guess is that it makes fairly noisy power on par with my Coleman from around that same time period. I'm partial to inverters now, so it's hard to imagine putting a lot of $$$ into an old generator that makes dirty power even when it's working correctly.
 

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yea depending on the retail of the gen new...
if it is under $600.00 to replace the gen.
it is not worth the time or parts unless you have a gen bone yard with a gen with a bad engine...
i think most heads or alts are $300-600 range depending on brand and output. for the smaller heads.

now with all the brands making LARGE avr power.... just as cheap to upgrade...
if you can get by with a LOUD gen set...

for me it is all about the quiet and smooth dependable power.
that is why the Honda eu series works for me.
as i sip my red coolaid! lol!
 

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..........So, one lesson learned is that I added a column to my power consumption worksheet that identifies what pole each appliance/plug is hooked up to so I can manage power at the pole level. Is this going overboard? .............
To help with balancing the load between the two poles/lines, you can move the breakers on your breaker box. I put the breaker for my microwave on a different line than the window AC and kitchen to help even things out. My 240VAC generator was only 3500W continuous so I tried not to pull more than 1700W from either line. I went to an inverter generator that puts out the same power (3500W), but is 120VAC and that actually made things easier since it is bridged to both lines. Now I don't need to worry about the power draw of each line. I just have to keep under the max output of my generator.
 

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We're stuck where we are for another year or two at least, but when we finally retire and move to a more affordable area, we'll be looking at reliable power for our next home in a big way. What I would like to do is find a home on a decent sized piece of land...at least 2 acres but also have access to municipal water and natural gas. I want to have a large 10-15kw solar array with large battery backup and inverter to power the house, but also connected to the grid. I'd like to be able to sell any excess power back to the utility company and also have a tri-fuel backup generator to charge the batteries when solar activity is poor and the grid is down. Total cost of a system like this would likely exceed $50k but I think it could pay for itself over 10-15 years.
 

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a lot of folks are looking at Iowa....

not too bad here...
storms yea... and cold in winter.
but there are some places where you are close enough to the city to get services.
and still have a hobby farm (40 acres)
that way you have enough room for a few things and are not right on top of the neighbors.

yea you have to watch the contracts on solar and wind.... with grid tie...
make sure they will let you run on those systems if the grid is down.
but i know a few farmers that have zero electric bills!
and are larger hog operations with solar panels on the hog houses (confinements)
same on a couple of larger beef operations near me.

before you move look at the utility contracts first!
 

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Well we lost power at 10:30 am on Sunday and waited until the next morning to fire up the generator. My setup is a Firman T07571 tri-fuel gen with a 30 amp plug and interlock device on my panel. My fuel was natural gas. I have GenTent to cover the generator in the event of rain. I have one portable AC in the master bedroom. This is the first use of my setup and I have to say that I was very pleased with the results with the exception of not enough AC. As LaSwamp said the heat and humidity was a killer. The AC plan needs some work.

Notes on my setup.

The panel feed with the interlock works well and has all the advantage that everyone talks about. The biggest difficulty is managing power consumption among a family that is used to running anything and everything at the same time. I had to place signs on high demand appliances stating to ask me for permission to use it (toaster, Microwave, coffee machine, etc.) so that I could shut down appliances to offset the added demand. With extension cords you can easily control what is plugged in. Don’t get me wrong, I would never go back to extension cords but the need for power management doesn’t go away with the panel feed.
So, after a day in the brutal heat with one room cool the wife and kids said later dad and left for a hotel in Mobile, Alabama. I stayed with the 3 cats. That made power management much easier. No surprise “I forgot that I needed to ask you before I use the microwave”.
So, running on NG lowered my gen’s wattage output to 5500 running watts. The first day I tried to just use the AC only at night for sleeping but quickly gave in and kept it running 24/7. One reason is that it took a long time to cool down the room if I let the room heat up all day long. So that meant that I was using ~ 1100 watts on one pole constantly. I was lucky to have the fridge and wine cooler (critical appliance) on the second pole which only added up to about 500 running watts. I tried to run additional appliances off of the second pole as much as I could. Fans in the kitchen, selected overhead lights that were on the second pole and left ones on the first pole off. I was trying to keep the usage at 50% or less since they had said that power restoration could take weeks! I was lucky and I feel guilty in my good fortune to have power back after 8 days. I feel so for all those that still don’t have power. So, one lesson learned is that I added a column to my power consumption worksheet that identifies what pole each appliance/plug is hooked up to so I can manage power at the pole level. Is this going overboard? I don’t know but since this was my first use of this genset and not knowing how long the power would be out I was doing everything I could to not stress the unit. Kept hearing about generator failures at different government and private facilities. Which by the way I had a self-made digital TV antenna that gave me access to the news on our local channels even though cable was out.
Moving on to oil changes. My first oil change was after 25 hours which was the break in period. The oil was definitely darker but not real dark. The second oil change came at 100 additional hours per maintenance schedule. I was surprised at how dark the oil was. That raised my concern so I decided to increase the interval level to every 50 hours. Well I was just getting ready to change the oil again at 50 additional hours when the power came back on.
Continuing on oil, I noticed around the second day that there was an oil stain on my bricks right under the air filter and confirmed that there was oil in the bottom of the air filter cabinet. I could prevent oil from dripping by wiping the inside of the air filter cabinet daily. Need to investigate this.
GenTent use: Because of the forecast of rain nearly every day (even though where I was, we didn't get any significant rain after the storm) I put the GeTent on nightly and occasionally during the day if it became cloudy. The first night it did rain and the tent worked as advertised but it was not a storm more like a summer shower. I do have concerns that the tent does prevent some heat dissipation from the generator and in the heat we were experiencing I was nervous so I tried to limit its use. I even used a patio umbrella to shade the generator from the blistering heat of the sun. I also made a point of giving the generator a 30 minute break twice a day.

In summary, I am thrilled that the natural gas option worked as well as it did. Also knowing that I can kick in additional wattage by switching to gasoline as a fuel (when the family is home and cable/internet is up) to 7500 watts. Never got to test this but no reason it won’t work.
I know the feeling! I ran my home on generator for 4i months after hurricanes Irma and Maria. I was using two generators; a Yamaha YG4600 and a Honda EU7000is. Rand those 24/7 only stopping for maintenance and refueling. The ran the whole house thru a manual transfer switch. And advice: get magnetic drain plug and a magnetic dipstick. Dont know what oil are you using but my generators run on Mobil One 10W30. The Yamaha is 22 years old and has run on synthetic from day one, maybe that's why it took that 4 month punishment without problems.
 

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a lot of folks are looking at Iowa....

not too bad here...
storms yea... and cold in winter.
but there are some places where you are close enough to the city to get services.
and still have a hobby farm (40 acres)
that way you have enough room for a few things and are not right on top of the neighbors.

yea you have to watch the contracts on solar and wind.... with grid tie...
make sure they will let you run on those systems if the grid is down.
but i know a few farmers that have zero electric bills!
and are larger hog operations with solar panels on the hog houses (confinements)
same on a couple of larger beef operations near me.

before you move look at the utility contracts first!
Don't you have to have a tri fuel Honda to cross the state line? :)
 
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