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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In NJ with gas heat, gas hot water, gas oven and dryer
Important items in house to have power:
Fridge (reg size nothing fancy)
FIOS, modem and 2 laptops plus tvs (we need to stay connected to our own business but are in the process of shutting it down due to our age)
Gas furnace if winter or ceiling fans if summer
Will have manual transfer switch so will consider connecting microwave but of course only use sporadically

My quandy: 2 of eu2200 in parallel gives a lot of flexibility and is cheap, but an eu7000i means we'd be able to live without sacrifice and the key start is really nice considering within the next year I expect to have a leg removed due to diabetes. We will be in the house for another 6-8 years.

Go with the 2 eu2200s or go with the eu7000?
 

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They're really apples and oranges.

The EU2200is is 120V-only and has standard 120V outlets. Most transfer switches are designed to receive an L14-30 cable and the EU2200is has no facility for that.

The EU7000is is both 120V/240V and has both standard 120V outlets as well as an L14-30 outlet for connection to a transfer switch.

Your wattage needs aren't that extensive and would mostly be met with the EU2200is (certainly, if you paralleled two of them together). But that generator wasn't designed for a transfer switch. And schlepping extension cords, while pretty straightforward, is a pain in the ass. And any hardwired appliances, like your furnace or ceiling fans, are a bridge too far.

The EU7000is solves those problems, but at the cost of higher purchase price and greater fuel consumption.

I have the EU7000is as well as the EU2000is older brother to the EU2200is you're looking at. They're both great generators. But they're really designed for different things.
 

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I live in MA and use an EU3000is with Protran transfer switch (electrician-installed) for our home's back up power.
It runs: gas furnace, office (router/computer, etc.), fridge, and living room TV, which is all we would need in an emergency.
The one that I use for the above has wheels thus it is easy for me to put in place (wheel out of shed [shed opens directly onto patio slab] when needed). It also has a battery start but I use the pull cord - it starts on the first/second pull every time.
Your power needs aside, you may be best to look at the logistics of storing/moving the unit. The 3000 might be all that you will need.
The 7000 is a beast power-wise, but also a beast to move IMO.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I live in MA and use an EU3000is with Protran transfer switch (electrician-installed) for our home's back up power.
It runs: gas furnace, office (router/computer, etc.), fridge, and living room TV, which is all we would need in an emergency.
The one that I use for the above has wheels thus it is easy for me to put in place (wheel out of shed [shed opens directly onto patio slab] when needed). It also has a battery start but I use the pull cord - it starts on the first/second pull every time.
Your power needs aside, you may be best to look at the logistics of storing/moving the unit. The 3000 might be all that you will need.
The 7000 is a beast power-wise, but also a beast to move IMO.
Thanks. Not going to have to move it. Have a modified doghouse just outside the garage, which is where the panel is, and all 4 walls are removable one at a time. Cord will just run 20' from the doghouse to the garage.

Can't afford the $20K+ for a standby. Town would require it to be behind the house and between the unit, the install including wiring to the panel all runs over $20K.
 

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I would consider two things first.
1) Where would you be storing this generator in relation to using it? Are you going to move it to the backyard, hook it up to the house (assuming some kind of inlet box to your elec panel?), pull start it, and all possibly in the winter? I'm able-bodied and that is a hassle for me.
2) How much electricity do you really need? I would first buy a Sense unit or similar, and have it installed. Knowledge is power, pun intended.

Edit: Looks like we posted at the same time. What kind connection to the panel is available?

Whenever you post to a forum like this, you're going to get the most passionate people on a given subject. Likewise, Honda is the king here. However, other options are certainly viable. If you bought a generator with a battery start, do you have an outlet nearby where you can plug this generator into a trickle charger? Is the generator going to be in a cold dog house all year?
 

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In NJ with gas heat, gas hot water, gas oven and dryer...Gas furnace if winter or ceiling fans if summer
Since you have NG, would you be using it as the fuel source for the gen? If so, then you need to factor in the conversion of the unit to use NG, or look for an off-the-shelf tri-fuel unit. The EU7000 is fine gen, but it is gasoline only without being converted.

We will be in the house for another 6-8 years.
Would you be leaving the gen or taking it with you? The reason I ask, is that might factor into such things as running electrical and gas lines to the doghouse. Quite an expense to undertake for 6-8 years of use unless your outages are quite frequent enough to justify the cost.

If noise is a factor (such as disturbing the neighbors), then an enclosed gen may take a priority over an open-frame gen unless the doghouse will sufficiently cut the noise factor. The open-frame gens generally cost less than a comparable enclosed gen.

The EU7000 is an enclosed inverter gen (yay!), but a far cheaper open-frame gen would free up some cash for plumbing the doghouse with NG and electrical wiring. Open-frame units such as the WEN GN875i or the Champion 100520 8750W are electric start inverter generators that are fairly comparable to the EU7000 output power. Both could be easily converted to NG fuel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I would prefer to stay Honda since everything I've ever done was Honda. Parents owned a Honda bike shop years ago and I was just brought up that you don't mess with anything other than them lol.. Plus their equipment just works.

Plumbing for natural gas won't happen. Gas is at the opposite corner of house and would require digging up asphalt to trench a line where it would have to go. Trickle charger is no big deal as there is an outlet there but expectation is to run the gen at least 30 mins a month to always be ready.

Sounds like maybe it comes down to the EM6500 or the EU7000. The efi of the EU7000 means it should run longer on same amount of gas which is a plus, but it's a lot more expensive. When we move in 6-8 years it will be into assisted living so we'll either sell it or give it to a neighbor etc.
 

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Gas is at the opposite corner of house and would require digging up asphalt to trench a line where it would have to go.
Would running it thru the attic be an option for you? That is where my NG lines are run.

Lifting heavy gasoline cans may be a issue in the future...only you would know your capabilities. And there is the constant storage, stabilization, and changeout of gasoline to deal with...not to mention that during an outage the first thing you can't get is gasoline. Where I live, within minutes of a major outage, long lines will form at gas stations that still have electricity to pump gas.
 

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I went with the EU7000is and the MSK7000 tri-fuel conversion kit. I have three places I can hook it up to natural gas...by the pool heater, the BBQ area or next to the fireplace gas insert. It runs great on NG with an irridium plug. If I run it back by the pool heater, I make use of the 100 FT 30A 240V generator cord.

I also just installed a 12kW 240V inverter and 20kWh rack mount battery bank to compliment the Honda. Both systems connect to the same interlock. The good thing about a battery backup system is that you get a tax rebate for 30% of the system cost as part of the new Inflation Reduction Act tax laws for battery systems (new in 2023). No solar required...

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My goal with all of this is to be prepared for a longer term grid down event. I don't want to rely on a small air cooled engine to run for weeks or months. Having batteries run your house for 20 hrs/day and generator for a few hours for recharging is a much better place to be than just having a small generator in such a scenario. Maybe one day I will add solar, but for now it should do. It is just another kind of insurance to me...nothing more. The battery backup sure is convenient for shorter outages though.
 

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👆 Nice!

I went with a Wi-Fi meter (I only use 120V) from Amazon...
If I lose my cable internet during an outage, I just hotspot my phone to see the meter.

Two meters would be required for split-phase 240V. You can install the Tuya Smart app on your phone along side the Smart Life app and set one meter to each app. That way, you can easily switch back and forth between the two apps to see the meters without having to change the meters within the app.

You do not have to create an account if you are just using the free version.
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Would running it thru the attic be an option for you? That is where my NG lines are run.

Lifting heavy gasoline cans may be a issue in the future...only you would know your capabilities. And there is the constant storage, stabilization, and changeout of gasoline to deal with...not to mention that during an outage the first thing you can't get is gasoline. Where I live, within minutes of a major outage, long lines will form at gas stations that still have electricity to pump gas.
That's a great idea that I never considered and will look into. Thank you!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I also just installed a 12kW 240V inverter and 20kWh rack mount battery bank to compliment the Honda. Both systems connect to the same interlock. The good thing about a battery backup system is that you get a tax rebate for 30% of the system cost as part of the new Inflation Reduction Act tax laws for battery systems (new in 2023). No solar required...


My goal with all of this is to be prepared for a longer term grid down event. I don't want to rely on a small air cooled engine to run for weeks or months. Having batteries run your house for 20 hrs/day and generator for a few hours for recharging is a much better place to be than just having a small generator in such a scenario. Maybe one day I will add solar, but for now it should do. It is just another kind of insurance to me...nothing more. The battery backup sure is convenient for shorter outages though.
I'll look into that thanks. I'll have to look into those tax laws - hadn't heard anything about that.
 

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I would prefer to stay Honda since everything I've ever done was Honda. Parents owned a Honda bike shop years ago and I was just brought up that you don't mess with anything other than them lol.. Plus their equipment just works.

Plumbing for natural gas won't happen. Gas is at the opposite corner of house and would require digging up asphalt to trench a line where it would have to go. Trickle charger is no big deal as there is an outlet there but expectation is to run the gen at least 30 mins a month to always be ready.

Sounds like maybe it comes down to the EM6500 or the EU7000. The efi of the EU7000 means it should run longer on same amount of gas which is a plus, but it's a lot more expensive. When we move in 6-8 years it will be into assisted living so we'll either sell it or give it to a neighbor etc.
well the cool thing is the hondas hold value!
so as long as you take care of it, you will get most of your money back!
 

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The 7000 will run in eco mode which will keep it sipping instead of gulping when you're demand is low. It would be the one to get, especially if you can solve the natural gas line situation. I have the predecessor to the 7000 and am using it with LP and it's really nice not worrying about obtaining, storing, filling with gasoline.

Also, it sounds like you could avoid load management entirely if using a 7000.
 
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