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Hi gLOVs7,

In this link you will find an extensive explanation in the domestic electrical field found in Philippine. very useful.
Regards
 

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that brings up the question if the appliances over there in the pi are neutral bonded to the chassis..
if so a 240 generator from the usa will not work with out a safety issue of a hot chassis..

they have the 230 to 240 in the rural areas as neutral to the 230 vac..
where in the usa we have it as L1 to L2 as 240... and both L1 and L1 are above neutral in voltage..

yea better to get the right generator for the Pi
unless you plan on all usa appliances over there..
 

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Discussion Starter #23 (Edited)
Hi gLOVs7, In this link you will find an extensive explanation in the domestic electrical field found in Philippine. very useful.

Regards
Osviur,

Thank you. I have been at the page a couple of times; long read, but by all accounts, about as thorough as anyone could want. I have yet to attempt going through it entirely...lol.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
yea better to get the right generator for the Pi
Yeah...I've pretty much given up on the idea of taking any electrical equipment, including the generator. Breaks my heart, though; she's been awesome, and I'm guessing she'd get a lot of use in PH.

Anyway, I greatly appreciate all the input; y'all have been very helpful.
 

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Greetings all.

I own the Subject generator and have used it multiple times here in the US. It's been a great generator, once running straight for 4-and-a-half days without a break. As it happens, however, I am looking at moving to the Philippines. And as much as I'd like to take the Honda with me, my research suggests that it may not work there, especially given that it appears that the wiring specifications/installations vary across the islands. What I think is correct is that, at the very least, the Philippines generally operates a 220V/60Hz infrastructure. Research further suggests that the physical plugs used on appliances (drills, blenders, hair dryers, etc.) look the same in both the US and Philippines.

The Honda has a "Rated voltage" of "120/240 V," with a "Rated frequency" of "60 Hz." So on the face of it, I say "Yes, it would work fine."

Now, I've been on various Philippines-oriented forums as part of my research, but have not had high confidence when it comes to this issue.

Also, I know just enough about electricity to be dangerous, so reading technical stuff, while interesting, doesn't necessarily qualify me to arrive at an informed and accurate conclusion. So, here I am.

Perhaps there is an online tutorial or White Paper that can give me guidance, or just a general website. Better yet would be someone who has actually used this generator in the Philippines.

I'd be grateful for whatever direction/answers knowledgeable folks can provide.

Thanks so much.
Based on what I found here I would say it won't work in rural Philippines, however in the cities (Manila, etc.) they use the two 120 legs to get 230 the same way we do to run our clothes dryers in the US. Not sure if you can rig you Gen but it may be as simple as making an adapter plug which you would plug into the Gen and use the two hot legs on the Philippine female type A or equivalent that they use over there.
OUTSIDE OF BIG CITIES: Two wire 230V Systems Areas outside of the old established cities were electrified later and use a different and more economical system using a two wire service drop to the residence. This consists of one 230 VAC load wire and one neutral wire. 120 VAC cannot be supplied by this type of system unless the property owner, at his own expense and with the cooperation of the utility company, installs his own transformer at the utility pole, a transformer having a secondary winding which can supply 120 VAC. This is not impossible as many utility transformers are recycled from the U.S., but it is expensive and in our view the 230 V systems are better unless the homeowner ships expensive appliances from the U.S. It will be difficult to find parts and service for these imported 120 V appliances.

Much of the rest of the world runs on 220-240 VAC but 50 cycle rather than 60 cycle found in the Philippines, creating a problem in importing some European appliances for use in the Philippines.
 

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I believe you can also take an single phase isolation transformer 5-7.5KVA and solve your problem. Most have taps to change the output voltage to exactly the voltage you want. You’ve got quite a bit invested in your generator and a few hundred bucks for a dry-type transformer is not that much more. I can’t speak for shipping charges though!.
 

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I believe you can also take an single phase isolation transformer 5-7.5KVA and solve your problem. Most have taps to change the output voltage to exactly the voltage you want. You’ve got quite a bit invested in your generator and a few hundred bucks for a dry-type transformer is not that much more. I can’t speak for shipping charges though!.
Well thats a fun idea. A quick searched shows that a good quality unit rated for 7.5 KVA is rather pricy though. ~$1,400 + shipping.


I guess it all comes down to the numbers. How much can you get for a used EU7000 vs shipping the gen and purchasing an appropriate isolation transformer plus installation.
 

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I hope you're understanding that the 220V there is completely different than US 240V. We have 2 120V legs 180 degrees opposed that create the 240V. The Philippines apparently use a single 220V hot leg kind of like the UK's 230V, only at 60Hz instead of 50Hz.
That might be a problem if he were trying to interface with their system which he is not.
 
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