Power Equipment Forum banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The Honda EU7000is has a very nice Bluetooth-enabled mobile device app - "My Generator" - that allows one to control the genset remotely. It's certainly very convenient being able to see things like fuel level, engine hours, and oil life while sitting on the couch inside.

The app also lets you start and stop the generator remotely, and that's the crux of my question.

Thinking about fuel conservation, I can contemplate shutting the generator off at various times during a utility outage. Certainly at night. And perhaps several times during the day, as well. My priority for this generator is supplying power to my well pump and running the generator for many hours when no water is being used makes little sense.

I can, of course, simply walk outside and physically turn off the generator; and again walk out to turn it back on when I want water. But the remote app begs the necessity of doing that.

Thing is, if you remotely stop the generator, the main switch remains "on." I'm long habituated to not leaving start circuit switches "on" when not in use because those circuits, left on, usually continue to drain the 12v starter battery.

Anyone have any insight on this kind of use case with the big Honda?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,044 Posts
I'm long habituated to not leaving start circuit switches "on" when not in use because those circuits, left on, usually continue to drain the 12v starter battery.
Leaving the switch on will eventually drain the battery. I would think that having a battery smart charger connected 24/7 should resolve that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,044 Posts
Oops, I didn't finish my comment.

If this is during a power outage, there was a post on the Home Depot site from Honda tech that said leaving the switch on for the weekend (the person asking the question was leaving town) was okay.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Roger, that @GenKnot.

I was hoping to hear that the Honda had some sort of timeout or some such on its starter circuit, preventing drain of the battery. It's great to hear that the Honda tech thinks it's fine to leave the switch on over a weekend. But if his answer was based on how long the battery might last until voltage drops too low to fire the starter... I think I'll pass. Definitely not good for the battery.

The good news is I keep the battery in the EU7000is fully charged (along with the motorcycles, ATV, and tractor), so it'll begin any utility outage in good shape. I'll just consider the Honda remote start feature something of a non-feature in the real world. And will just walk outside to stop and start the generator.

Thanks again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
132 Posts
his answer was based on how long the battery might last until voltage drops too low to fire the starter
Not a honda, but I have an inexpensive overseas branded gen with remote and it works the same way, power switch must be on any time you want to use the remote.
Like you I have a tough time leaving something turned on. I do however love the remote for shutting it down when the power comes back, then go out and kill the power switch when I get to it, be it a few hours or over night. With mine being a carbed unit and not EFI, I'm more concerned with shutting the fuel off in an over night situation, I can always charge the battery.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,386 Posts
I'm sure leaving it for a day or two is acceptable. How long the battery will last depends on how much parasitic current it's pulling.

Which takes us to the next step... use a multi-tester to find out the quiescent current draw.

So if it draws 50mA, an 8Ah battery will flatline after about 6.6 days, best case.

If instead it just draws 5mA, the same battery will take a little over 2 months to deplete.

Of course, you don't want it to go beyond 25% DoD as you still need the battery to be able to engage the starter motor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,639 Posts
The Honda EU7000is has a very nice Bluetooth-enabled mobile device app - "My Generator" - that allows one to control the genset remotely. It's certainly very convenient being able to see things like fuel level, engine hours, and oil life while sitting on the couch inside.

The app also lets you start and stop the generator remotely, and that's the crux of my question.

Thinking about fuel conservation, I can contemplate shutting the generator off at various times during a utility outage. Certainly at night. And perhaps several times during the day, as well. My priority for this generator is supplying power to my well pump and running the generator for many hours when no water is being used makes little sense.

I can, of course, simply walk outside and physically turn off the generator; and again walk out to turn it back on when I want water. But the remote app begs the necessity of doing that.

Thing is, if you remotely stop the generator, the main switch remains "on." I'm long habituated to not leaving start circuit switches "on" when not in use because those circuits, left on, usually continue to drain the 12v starter battery.

Anyone have any insight on this kind of use case with the big Honda?
make sure to have a battery charger on the unit or go a larger external HD battery...
starting and stopping is hard on the little batteries...
they do not get a proper charge.
you can use a solar panel with a charge controller to help.
the small batteries are a real problem with all gens..
i like a group 31 deep cycle. they work well.
and with a proper charger they last 10 years for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
A larger, deep cycle battery is a great idea. Alas, I already need to wheel the big Honda a couple hundred feet from the shed where it lives to the location where my transfer switch is. And since most utility outages happen during inclement weather, there's the additional task of affixing a tarp to the deck railing to protect the generator.

Lotta stuff going on. I'm probably not going to add schlepping an external battery and hookups to the mix if its only benefit is being able to use the remote stop/start feature.

I do actively manage all the starter batteries here at the homestead, including a battery test a couple times a year to assess health. Data that then gets recorded in a spreadsheet. I find that if you watch the trends of declining voltage and increasing cell resistance over time, you can stay ahead of a battery's life cycle and replace it before it fails on you.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,530 Posts
With my BT eu7000, I leave the key switch on always. (The GCU goes to sleep but the BT module stays active) The battery is connected to a noco maintainer at all times. This has been the case for a year with no problems.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,386 Posts
If you have a battery maintainer, I would think that leaving it on indefinitely is fine.

It's only going to be a problem if you keep it on during an extended outage without running the generator (to recharge the battery) every couple of days or so. Though statistically, you're likely to use the generator at least once a day anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
With my BT eu7000, I leave the key switch on always. (The GCU goes to sleep but the BT module stays active) The battery is connected to a noco maintainer at all times. This has been the case for a year with no problems.
Aha, so the start circuit does go to sleep? That's what prompted me to pose my original question. (The BT module would obviously need to remain active, else there wouldn't be a way for the remote app to talk to the generator... but BT typically requires very little current).

The starter battery in my EU7000is is kept topped off every day via a battery tender. But kinda like including a deep cycle battery when configuring the gen setup for use, I'm not likely to bring out that battery tender. There reaches a point where the benefit (being able to remotely stop/start the gen) gets outweighed by the additional hassle of extra setup steps. If I had a permanent enclosure next to the transfer switch, it'd be different.

I probably ought to just do what you suggested earlier, @OrlyP... and put a meter on it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
485 Posts
Roger, that @GenKnot.

I was hoping to hear that the Honda had some sort of timeout or some such on its starter circuit, preventing drain of the battery. It's great to hear that the Honda tech thinks it's fine to leave the switch on over a weekend. But if his answer was based on how long the battery might last until voltage drops too low to fire the starter... I think I'll pass. Definitely not good for the battery.

The good news is I keep the battery in the EU7000is fully charged (along with the motorcycles, ATV, and tractor), so it'll begin any utility outage in good shape. I'll just consider the Honda remote start feature something of a non-feature in the real world. And will just walk outside to stop and start the generator.

Thanks again.
Also remember the battery is charging when the generators running, so it should charge the battery back up again depending how long you run the gen for. And surely it would take 24hrs or longer for the gen to deaden the battery?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,639 Posts
Aha, so the start circuit does go to sleep? That's what prompted me to pose my original question. (The BT module would obviously need to remain active, else there wouldn't be a way for the remote app to talk to the generator... but BT typically requires very little current).

The starter battery in my EU7000is is kept topped off every day via a battery tender. But kinda like including a deep cycle battery when configuring the gen setup for use, I'm not likely to bring out that battery tender. There reaches a point where the benefit (being able to remotely stop/start the gen) gets outweighed by the additional hassle of extra setup steps. If I had a permanent enclosure next to the transfer switch, it'd be different.

I probably ought to just do what you suggested earlier, @OrlyP... and put a meter on it.
but the blue tooth radio receiver stays on for a low current drain.
so make sure to use a battery charger maintainer with up to 1-2 amps of charge with low current fall back.
the noco and a few others are a good choice.
pm if you need links
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
The Honda EU7000is has a very nice Bluetooth-enabled mobile device app - "My Generator" - that allows one to control the genset remotely. It's certainly very convenient being able to see things like fuel level, engine hours, and oil life while sitting on the couch inside.

The app also lets you start and stop the generator remotely, and that's the crux of my question.

Thinking about fuel conservation, I can contemplate shutting the generator off at various times during a utility outage. Certainly at night. And perhaps several times during the day, as well. My priority for this generator is supplying power to my well pump and running the generator for many hours when no water is being used makes little sense.

I can, of course, simply walk outside and physically turn off the generator; and again walk out to turn it back on when I want water. But the remote app begs the necessity of doing that.

Thing is, if you remotely stop the generator, the main switch remains "on." I'm long habituated to not leaving start circuit switches "on" when not in use because those circuits, left on, usually continue to drain the 12v starter battery.

Anyone have any insight on this kind of use case with the big Honda?
I leave mine ON 24/7 so I can use a wired remote. I added a solar powered trickle charger/maintainer to the generator battery, no problems in years of use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
Any details on the well pump? I'm working on a well pump start-up issue currently.

Depending on the start-up current, might wanna have a delay circuit so genny can warm-up a bit before hitting it with a big load.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,639 Posts
Can those be started with a load attached? (house) If so that is a nice feature in favor of inverter generators.
yes if the load is not super big.

you are best to have a programmable load shed setup for automatic.

i prefer a manual setup.
and meters on the breaker panel so you can watch the loads as you trip in the breakers.

always map out the power for the breaker panel.
and have the exact load max written down on a master sheet for each breaker.

i always start with lights
it is a known value and i do have a day night amps numbers . more at night as i have lots of outside led lights.
then computer gear
and last the HVAC .

i use ups units to help on the computer gear as well as the lights.
so you have to watch when you kick in those as the battery chargers can be at full when you trip them in for the ups units.

i am thinking of eliminating the chargers on the ups units
and converting over to a common battery array for all of the ups units.
i think this will help in the long run with a charger setup in lower current steps for better power management during the gen run.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top