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Honda's idea of getting max current out of the gen is to spread your load across all receptacles. This is obviously not ideal if you use it to power your home through your main panel.

Wait for @iowagold. I believe he would be able to assist you one way or another in converting the 30A receptacle to a 50A one.
 

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An alternative solution (albeit, a little more expensive) to get 50A out of it through a single receptacle BUT without tearing into the generator internals, is to get the parallel kit. Even without a 2nd EU7000is, the parallel kit should provide the 45Amps to your load at 120VAC. At the same time, this gets you ready if you find yourself needing another EU7000is later.
 

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Check out this thread:

Looks like using a step down transformer is the only legal way to do this now.

Guy Holt comments:
Slow down. As someone who used to offer this mod (the picture above is from our website) and can no longer do so, I can tell you that even if you could find someone to do it these days (I doubt you will) I wouldn't do it. While the modification was very straight forward with the Honda EU6500, there are mechanical issues that make it very difficult on the Honda EU7000. And, since January of 2020 there are now Code issues that make it illegal in many states. For these reasons, any responsible shop that used to do the mod no longer does so. Let's look at the mechanical reasons first.

Starting with the 2017 Code, the NEC mandates that any portable generator under 10kW with 240V output be GFCI protected. To make it code compliant Honda has put GFCIs on the latest edition of the EU 7000 leaving no room for the 60A Bates on the redesigned power panel. Those companies that continued to offer the mod (Multiquip) could only do so by completely removing the 30A Twist-Lock from the panel, moving the control circuit board, building in overcurrent protection, and machining a cover plate to cover the hole in the panel left by the 30A Twist-lock. They also had to silk screen onto the cover plate the warnings required to reduce their liability. Of course all this was not UL tested and so voided the UL listing of the generator.

Fast forward to January 2020. The 2020 edition of the Code greatly expanded GFCI requirements to include all outdoor circuits of 150V or less to ground and 50A or less whether fixed or portable. Since the Bates mode provided 50A at 120V it now requires GFCI protection which is why I suspect even Multiquip will discontinue offering the modification. The only way to get a 60A circuit capable of powering a 4kW HMI or 5kW Tungsten light out of a Honda EU6500 or EU7000 is to use a small step-down transformer to convert the 240V output of the generator to 120V. Since this circuit is 60A at 120V it is not required by Code to be protected by a GFCI.

The NEC is the minimum required for electrical safety on set. Our industry standards writing group, ESTA, recommends the use of GFCIs on all branch circuits of 100A or less. For this reason we now offer a listed 60A GFCI that can be used on a step-down transformer, or on any 60 or 100A Bates circuit to provide unparalleled ground fault protection. And since NEC Section 215.9 permits the use of a GFCI on the feeder of branch circuits requiring GFCIs, it can also be used to provide the GFCI protection required on the 20A circuits of gang and lunch boxes as pictured below.

Guy Holt, Gaffer, ScreenLight & Grip, Lighting rental & sales in Boston.
 
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