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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Well, I was in the market to get a generator to replace my old one, and after some research, I decided to go with the Honda Eu6500is. I also decided to convert it to tri-fuel. However, when I Google searched to find any information, I was blown away by how little information (essentially none) that I could find. So I decided to share my story so that if anybody else is in the same boat, this may help.

I live on the Gulf Coast near Houston. I bought my first generator a couple of months before Hurricane Katrina. It was a gasoline 6500/5500 unit that I bought from a big box store for around $550. I used it off and on using extension cords to the refrigerator, freezer, etc for about 6 hours after Hurricane Rita and during a few local power outages.

Fast forward a number of years, and I was in a different house, and we just had a number of bad luck scenarios with storms, cars hitting power poles, etc where the generator was used about 8 times for a minimum of 2 hours in under a year. At that point, I hooked up the always frowned upon back-feed. I installed a plug on the side of my house next to the breaker box. I'd just wheel it out of the garage, turn off my main, turn off the breakers, plug in the gen, fire it up and then start turning on the desired breakers. This worked fine, but I couldn't do it during a storm that would knock out power.

Then we had Hurricane Ike, and my house was without power for 17 days. Luckily the weather following the hurricane was relatively pleasant. We slept in one room which I had threw in a window a/c. It worked; however, the generator was really loud, finding gas became a problem, the gas costs were expensive, I was always worried about it getting stolen (even though it was locked up) and I worried about a storm in the middle of the night destroying it.

Well, before the beginning of the hurricane season (that just now is ending), I decided to make a change. I decided that I wanted to get a Honda quiet generator and a quick search showed me that I could get one with the same wattage. I also noticed on eBay that there were tri-fuel kits available. On a bit of an impulse, I went ahead and purchased my Honda EU6500is from the place that most campers go for the best deal (not sure if we can name names here or not). So, I got my generator new at the best price.

A few weeks after it arrived, I began looking for a tri-fuel kit. Since my natural gas line/meter was 8 feet from the breaker box and back-feed box, my plan was to pour a concrete slap with eye bolts (for locking up) where I could park the generator when needed and hook it up to the natural gas and house.

I searched for the kit, and ended up going through Maine Diesel (I think I'm safe here since they seem to be the only non-eBay dealer). Instead of sending in my carb, I bought the kit that came with the carb.

The kit arrived, and I'll just tell you there are essentially no instructions.

While trying to figure out when I was going to install the kit, I began to think more about my project, which I should have formulated before this began. It wasn't long after Hurricane Ike that I ran a 50 amp 220 volt circuit out to my garage, because it only had 1 15 amp circuit out there, lol. I installed another panel in the garage (detached). I thought how nice it would be to back-feed from there where the generator could stay in the secure and dry garage.

Of course, I had two problems. 1. Exhaust fumes. 2. Natural gas.

I found on eBay and exhaust kit build specifically for the eu6500is that essentially bolts a flexible exhaust pipe right on. I purchased it. Now, I'd be able to vent out the exhaust.

Next came the bigger problem. I had to run a natural gas line to the garage. The total run was about 110'. After I did some research, I found there was really nothing to it but the cost. I bought a 150' spool of the flexible plastic tubing designed for natural gas along with the two risers. The cost for all three was around $260. I then paid someone to dig a 20" deep trench the whole way (by hand) for $120. Then I bought the additional hardware, galvanized pipe, fittings, valves - another $135. At this point, I also decided to have an outlet for a natural gas grill, since it is right next to my patio.

So, now everything was in place, and I decided to hook up my kit.

Like I said, it came with no instructions, and Maine Diesel said they didn't have any but that I could ask their techies any questions I had. I looked online and found a YouTube video of a guy changing out the carb on a eu6500is. So, I used that as a guide.

The kit was nice and had everything I needed (other than instructions). I did have to drill 3 holes in my generator (2 for mounting the regulator and 1 for routing the fuel line). The first time I did the kit (notice "first time"), it took me about an hour. There really isn't too much to hooking it up, in fact, it's pretty easy. It took me this long, because I wanted to make sure I was drilling in the areas that would be best functionally and esthetically. Additionally, there are a couple of clips that are difficult to get to and down right annoying to get back in place.

Well, I finally get the kit on and go to start it up for the first time.

At this point, it was lucky that I had done my natural gas grill connection and bought the grill. When I first hooked up my grill, I could hear the gas flowing, but it just wouldn't light. Finally, I laughed at myself, and realized than it would take a little bit to purge the regular air out of the 110' of 1" gas line. Duhhh!!!

So, I start cranking and cranking (by battery of course) the generator and adjusting the regulator with no success.

One of my goals, was to never put gasoline in the tank or run it through the carb. I called the kit provider, and he said that maybe there was a problem with the generator since I didn't even know if it ran.

Well, I ended up putting gasoline in, and no starty. I was pissed. I'd have the generator for nearly 3 months, and now I had drilled holes in it. I knew the warranty was considered void, but felt that I could put the old carb on and maybe Honda wouldn't notice.

I put the old carb back on and removed the regulator and lines.

I'm glad the lines didn't take long to remove and attach, because once my brain fart cleared, I turned the key and fired up the generator. It ran like a champ, and purred like a kitten.

Did I make a mistake during my installation of the kit and not reconnect something? Well, one way to find out. I put it all back on and tried to start it. No luck.

So, I pulled off the carb and called Maine Diesel.

About this time, there was a hurricane heading toward the gulf.

I told the guys at Maine Generator to send me a replacement carb immediately, and told them just to charge my credit card for it and then do a refund when they received the one I was returning back. I said I'd pay for rush delivery since the last thing I wanted was to be stuck on gasoline again if I got the hurricane. Needless to say, my return arrived to them before they even got my replacement out the door. Figures. Luckily for me, and not New Orleans, Louisiana got the storm.

The replacement carburetor showed up about a week later. I could immediately see this was a used carb, even though I had technically paid for a new one. But at this point, I just wanted it to be done, and I figured that at least, in theory, it was a working carb.

I bolted everything back on (15 minutes this time) and started it up. It ran rough, but after a few seconds of adjust the regulator (a single screw), it began purring like a kitten. I then turned off the auto-idle to get the engine revs up, and it ran a tiny bit rough until I did another 5 second adjustment. Now it purrs at any RPM.

BTW, I did run all of the gasoline out of the tank.

I really wish I had video taped the kit installation to put on YouTube for others, but it's too late now.

It was definitely not a cheap project. Per dollar, I'm guessing I couldn't get a more pricey per watt return unless I had paid somebody to do all the work. That would have been crazy expensive.

I like the fact that it's still a portable generator on wheels that I could take anywhere and run on gas.

It would have definitely been cheaper to go with a 17KW natural gas generator for the whole home that would have ran one of my central a/c's, so I still wonder in my mind if I went the best route. Obvioiusly, it would NOT have been the same in terms of quality and reliability as the Honda, but since it's just for emergencies, it's still a tough call.

I'll post what photos I have now, which, unfortunately, does not include the kit installation process.

If anybody has any questions, just let me know.

Additionally, I take criticism well, so if you think I'm an idiot for the cost, backfeeding, installing my own natural gas or sub-panel, just voice your thoughts, because it won't hurt my feelings.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Here are the following photos: carb with ng line, riser off gas main, riser into garage, gas connections, exhaust kit, exhaust vent, gen.

carbreturn.JPG

gas1.jpg

riser.jpg

gas.jpg

exhaust.jpg

vent.jpg

gen.jpg
 

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Thank you for that - I joined the forum just to be able to see your pics, and it was well worth it.
I have the same generator, and the same tri-fuel kit (from the same source). I've been hesitant to install it due to the sparse instructions, just as you were. Your post and pics will make it easier.

Have you tried yours on propane? I'm wondering how many hours one would get out of a 20# tank? I have used mine with gasoline, and get an honest 14 hours out of a fill with a modest load, but I don't like to use gasoline due to storage issues and the gas going stale so quickly.
Again, thanks for your input!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I have not run it on propane as of yet. At some point, I'll get a hose so that I can try it out and have the option in the future.

If you have any questions, need advise or need any pictures to help with your install, let me know and I'll do what I can.

The installation really isn't that tough (assuming there are no issues with the carb). I think the most important thing is going slow and making sure you don't drop any screws or clips, because they are hard to get. One thing I'd recommend is buying one of those little extending probes with the magnet on the end. I dropped 2 clips and a bolt, and they would have been very hard to snag without the magnet. I'd also recommend getting a little light that straps to your forehead since an overhead light won't reach the areas you'll be working in and drop lights seem to always flop into the wrong position.
 

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I also joined this forum to see your pics. I was wondering if you can elaborate on the difficulty or ease of the carb removal and reinstallation. I hope to purchase the tri-fuel kit from the same place as you ... (since my eu6500is is used i will need to send my existing carb in to have them drill it it. ) Are you able to link to the video you saw on youtube thats shows carb removal? One other question when the unit is operating on nat gas with little to no load does the unit automatically lower the rpm (eco throttle) just like it does running on unleaded gasoline?
Thanks in advance
 

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Here's some criticism.

Get yourself a proper transfer switch or interlock and use it. You have an accident waiting to happen. What happens when you're tired, or maybe had a few, and need to fire up or disconnect the generator? That suicide cord is an accident waiting to happen too.

Or, maybe you're not home but your kids are. They've seen Dad hook it up and want to do the same.

That yellow line you have for the natural gas, replace it with something that can take the vibration. It's one thing to use it for a stove but a whole different story to use it in something that vibrates. If you move the generator more than a few times it'll work harden and leak.

Running it in the garage, albeit a detached garage, is not smart. Never run a small engine in an enclosed area. Your exhaust system can leak and you don't smell CO.

Sorry, I don't approve of this or your post. Someone else may think that if you got away with it that they can too.

Is any of this inspected? I thought not.
 

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As always, constructive criticism from an articulate well mannered poster is always appreciated.

Perhaps one will join the thread at some point.:)
 

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Question regarding manual transfer switch. Do i need to use a 3PDT (switching the neutral) Or can I use a DPDT (switching only the hots)?
 

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Echo, it depends on the generator.

If the neutral is bonded to the frame you need to switch the neutral.
generator is the honda eu6500is. the neutral and ground are NOT bonded in the generator, however in my home panel neutral and ground are bonded. I'm thinking a DPDT switch is the way to go (just swithing the hot leads)




on a seperate topic... do you know if it is acceptable to use a flexible metal conduit as a ground for a subpanel (I know the sub panel must have 4 wires and the ground and neutral be kept separate)
 

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The neutral and ground bond in the main panel is correct, and it should be the only bond. You don't need to switch the neutral.

Check with your AHJ. You're limited to 6' if using flexible metal conduit as an equipment ground. NEC 250.118(5) lists the requirements.
 

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did the same exact thing

I had purchased the Honda EM7000 which turned into the EU6500, it was the largest inverter quiet one the sold some 5 or 6 years ago and yes by the time I ran the gas line and put in transfer box and bought trifuel kit from same place, it was a few pennies, BUT, this thing has never let me down, NEVER, I know 2 people who didn't spend that much less on some Home Depot natural gas model after installation and they constantly have problems, mine a little more work, to to wheel into place, but it always works, mine sits on the back deck and in front of the house, you hear other generators 5 houses down, before mine. and i just honestly don't think I will have a problem the next 10 years. We live in an area with everyone on well water, people who gave me crap on buying a Honda, or for spending so much money on 6000 watts, are the same people that have one time or another came to me for water because their genny broke down. I have no regrets, but it is not as quiet as it used to be, what is that muffler thing your talking about?

Well, I was in the market to get a generator to replace my old one, and after some research, I decided to go with the Honda Eu6500is. I also decided to convert it to tri-fuel. However, when I Google searched to find any information, I was blown away by how little information (essentially none) that I could find. So I decided to share my story so that if anybody else is in the same boat, this may help.



I found on eBay and exhaust kit build specifically for the eu6500is that essentially bolts a flexible exhaust pipe right on. I purchased it. Now, I'd be able to vent out the exhaust.

Next came the bigger problem. I had to run a natural gas line to the garage. The total run was about 110'. After I did some research, I found there was really nothing to it but the cost. I bought a 150' spool of the flexible plastic tubing designed for natural gas along with the two risers. The cost for all three was around $260. I then paid someone to dig a 20" deep trench the whole way (by hand) for $120. Then I bought the additional hardware, galvanized pipe, fittings, valves - another $135. At this point, I also decided to have an outlet for a natural gas grill, since it is right next to my patio.

So, now everything was in place, and I decided to hook up my kit.

Like I said, it came with no instructions, and Maine Diesel said they didn't have any but that I could ask their techies any questions I had. I looked online and found a YouTube video of a guy changing out the carb on a eu6500is. So, I used that as a guide.

The kit was nice and had everything I needed (other than instructions). I did have to drill 3 holes in my generator (2 for mounting the regulator and 1 for routing the fuel line). The first time I did the kit (notice "first time"), it took me about an hour. There really isn't too much to hooking it up, in fact, it's pretty easy. It took me this long, because I wanted to make sure I was drilling in the areas that would be best functionally and esthetically. Additionally, there are a couple of clips that are difficult to get to and down right annoying to get back in place.

Well, I finally get the kit on and go to start it up for the first time.

At this point, it was lucky that I had done my natural gas grill connection and bought the grill. When I first hooked up my grill, I could hear the gas flowing, but it just wouldn't light. Finally, I laughed at myself, and realized than it would take a little bit to purge the regular air out of the 110' of 1" gas line. Duhhh!!!

So, I start cranking and cranking (by battery of course) the generator and adjusting the regulator with no success.

One of my goals, was to never put gasoline in the tank or run it through the carb. I called the kit provider, and he said that maybe there was a problem with the generator since I didn't even know if it ran.

Well, I ended up putting gasoline in, and no starty. I was pissed. I'd have the generator for nearly 3 months, and now I had drilled holes in it. I knew the warranty was considered void, but felt that I could put the old carb on and maybe Honda wouldn't notice.

I put the old carb back on and removed the regulator and lines.

I'm glad the lines didn't take long to remove and attach, because once my brain fart cleared, I turned the key and fired up the generator. It ran like a champ, and purred like a kitten.

Did I make a mistake during my installation of the kit and not reconnect something? Well, one way to find out. I put it all back on and tried to start it. No luck.

So, I pulled off the carb and called Maine Diesel.

About this time, there was a hurricane heading toward the gulf.

I told the guys at Maine Generator to send me a replacement carb immediately, and told them just to charge my credit card for it and then do a refund when they received the one I was returning back. I said I'd pay for rush delivery since the last thing I wanted was to be stuck on gasoline again if I got the hurricane. Needless to say, my return arrived to them before they even got my replacement out the door. Figures. Luckily for me, and not New Orleans, Louisiana got the storm.

The replacement carburetor showed up about a week later. I could immediately see this was a used carb, even though I had technically paid for a new one. But at this point, I just wanted it to be done, and I figured that at least, in theory, it was a working carb.

I bolted everything back on (15 minutes this time) and started it up. It ran rough, but after a few seconds of adjust the regulator (a single screw), it began purring like a kitten. I then turned off the auto-idle to get the engine revs up, and it ran a tiny bit rough until I did another 5 second adjustment. Now it purrs at any RPM.

BTW, I did run all of the gasoline out of the tank.

I really wish I had video taped the kit installation to put on YouTube for others, but it's too late now.

It was definitely not a cheap project. Per dollar, I'm guessing I couldn't get a more pricey per watt return unless I had paid somebody to do all the work. That would have been crazy expensive.

I like the fact that it's still a portable generator on wheels that I could take anywhere and run on gas.

It would have definitely been cheaper to go with a 17KW natural gas generator for the whole home that would have ran one of my central a/c's, so I still wonder in my mind if I went the best route. Obvioiusly, it would NOT have been the same in terms of quality and reliability as the Honda, but since it's just for emergencies, it's still a tough call.

I'll post what photos I have now, which, unfortunately, does not include the kit installation process.

If anybody has any questions, just let me know.

Additionally, I take criticism well, so if you think I'm an idiot for the cost, backfeeding, installing my own natural gas or sub-panel, just voice your thoughts, because it won't hurt my feelings.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I also joined this forum to see your pics. I was wondering if you can elaborate on the difficulty or ease of the carb removal and reinstallation. I hope to purchase the tri-fuel kit from the same place as you ... (since my eu6500is is used i will need to send my existing carb in to have them drill it it. ) Are you able to link to the video you saw on youtube thats shows carb removal? One other question when the unit is operating on nat gas with little to no load does the unit automatically lower the rpm (eco throttle) just like it does running on unleaded gasoline?
Thanks in advance
Sorry for the delay.

The carb removal and reinstallation is fairly simple, IMHO.

The only tough part are those pesky 2 clips.

I'll see if I can locate that video and post a link.

Yes, on natural gas eco throttle acts just like it does on gasoline.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Found it.


This will get you past those clips for the air box. Once you get the air box cover off, it's easy at that point. At least until it's time to put those clips back on.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Here's some criticism.

Get yourself a proper transfer switch or interlock and use it. You have an accident waiting to happen. What happens when you're tired, or maybe had a few, and need to fire up or disconnect the generator? That suicide cord is an accident waiting to happen too.

Or, maybe you're not home but your kids are. They've seen Dad hook it up and want to do the same.

That yellow line you have for the natural gas, replace it with something that can take the vibration. It's one thing to use it for a stove but a whole different story to use it in something that vibrates. If you move the generator more than a few times it'll work harden and leak.

Running it in the garage, albeit a detached garage, is not smart. Never run a small engine in an enclosed area. Your exhaust system can leak and you don't smell CO.

Sorry, I don't approve of this or your post. Someone else may think that if you got away with it that they can too.

Is any of this inspected? I thought not.
I appreciate your comments.

I'll address each real fast.

As far as the switch goes, I have a ton of "accidents waiting to happen" all over the place, especially if I'm tired or have been drinking. I have a drill press, I have a table saw, I have a circular saw, etc. etc. The steps are very simple and safe to do it right. If you cut off your main, followed by each breaker, plug in the cord (both sides), start the generator, and then start turning on your breakers for the stuff you'll use, it's perfectly safe. Are at least as safe, or probably more, than things like welding. I'm sure that it would be very dangerous for people who just follow the steps with no understanding of it, but if you have the knowledge, it's not a problem, IMHO.

My kids see me driving my car, boat, jetskis, etc. etc. They know not to touch the generator, but there are dangers for them everywhere. And since this thing may be fired up to use once or twice a year, I'm not going to sweat it.

The good thing about CO is that they sell CO detectors. I happen to have 2 of them in my garage since I work on jetskis, lawnmowers, etc. The reason I have two is for that safety redundancy; plus, the "test" switch tests the alarm and not the sensor. Additionally, I won't be staying the night in my garage, and if I'm in there for an extended period, I'd have the passage door open and the garage door at least partially up. But with the CO alarms, it doesn't matter that I can't smell the CO.

BTW, I'm running under the assumption that the vast majority of people coming to this forum are not your guys who are calling a wrecker to change their flat tires or an electrician to install a ceiling fan. There is no way I'd recommend my setup to either of my two brother-in-laws who take their cars in to have brake light bulbs changed.

Now, on to that hose. I would like to hear more about why you believe it is a hazard. Can you show me anything documenting that those hoses harden? I know that is the same type of hose used on my gas dryer. I know that my gas dryer vibrates. I know that every so often, I pull out my dryer to sweep behind it or check the exhaust hose for lint buildup. If you can show me something, I'll be changing it out to another type. Which type do you recommend?

Finally, on to the subject of inspections. Did I have this inspected? ROFLMAO. I can say this, I trust the majority of my installations that I'll be using for years to come over the guy wanting to get the check and get to the next customer asap. It reminds me of when I had my gas line tapped out my old house for an in-ground grill that was being installed. After he gets the tap in and is about to move on, I ask him if he's going to spray it with a soap solution to check for leaks, and he responded (maybe not the exact words), "I use to be an inspector, so I know my work is good." He gave me the most pissed off look you could imagine when I came out of the house with a spray bottle and checked it. Now, maybe he was lying about being an inspector, but I have to question why somebody would work for the city as an inspector for a fraction of what they'd make doing the actual installations.

If you disagree with me, no problem, but I do like the fact that you gave your opinion and added to the discussion. So thanks again. Oh, and let me know about that pipe issue please.
 

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Peter,

What you do in your own home is fine by me. I have no issues with any of that but please don't give someone else the idea that this is an acceptable (as in approved) means of hooking up a generator.

For the hose, get a flexible hose, not a gas line. You can find them here:

Hook-Up Hoses

You might also consider some of the quick disconnects, just like an airline disconnect, so you can move the generator easily if you had too.

Being metal, the gas line you have can/will work harden. Sure a dryer vibrates some but not as much as your generator. Check out a professionally installed backup generator - some of the whole house systems. They are mounted to a pad and obviously don't move but the fuel line will have a short length of flexible hose in line with it.

I do agree with you on "inspections." In my town inspections are nothing more than a way to make money. The inspections themselves are a joke.

Thanks for tone of your reply. I know my criticism was harsh. Remember, I know nothing about your abilities and don't want someone that isn't at your level to "try it."
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Peter,

What you do in your own home is fine by me. I have no issues with any of that but please don't give someone else the idea that this is an acceptable (as in approved) means of hooking up a generator.

For the hose, get a flexible hose, not a gas line. You can find them here:

Hook-Up Hoses

You might also consider some of the quick disconnects, just like an airline disconnect, so you can move the generator easily if you had too.

Being metal, the gas line you have can/will work harden. Sure a dryer vibrates some but not as much as your generator. Check out a professionally installed backup generator - some of the whole house systems. They are mounted to a pad and obviously don't move but the fuel line will have a short length of flexible hose in line with it.

I do agree with you on "inspections." In my town inspections are nothing more than a way to make money. The inspections themselves are a joke.

Thanks for tone of your reply. I know my criticism was harsh. Remember, I know nothing about your abilities and don't want someone that isn't at your level to "try it."
I respect your opinion on the issue, and you are correct, this method is not for the majority of people out there.

I'll be swapping out that hose based upon your recommendation.

Have a great Thanksgiving.
 

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I'll be swapping out that hose based upon your recommendation.
Very good choice. My friend installed hook up hoses on his propane range because he cleans behind it several times a year. He procrastinated a long time because the copper was working, however, he knew it was not ideal and wanted to change it. He did the same for a propane fridge. You need to get behind and clean and service these things periodically.
 

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EU6500is tri fuel converion

I just bought an EU6500is Living 12 days with no power after sandy the Coleman Powermate I had proved TOO noise (and thirsty) so I took the plunge and bought the Honda. I've been interested in the tri fuel converion kits available but was scared off by the local power equipment shop owner who claims they run too hot and destroy the engine. (quote, unquote) Hoping you guys can weigh in and shed some light on this.
 
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