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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
On my EU2200i, the voltages at the socket measure 128v hot to neutral, 44v hot to ground and 101v neutral to ground.

Is this normal?

I'm asking because the 120v charging cord for my electric car says it's faulty. (I've got some two year old stabilized gas that I would rather use than take to the toxic waste dump.)
 

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On my EU2200i, the voltages at the socket measure 128v hot to neutral, 44v hot to ground and 101v neutral to ground.

Is this normal?

I'm asking because the 120v charging cord for my electric car says it's faulty. (I've got some two year old stabilized gas that I would rather use than take to the toxic waste dump.)
yea pretty much.
the gen is set as floating ground chassis.
so if you are to run it as a stand alone gen set you need a ground stake to the ground point on the front panel.

so you are planning on charging an ev with the eu2200i?
what brand and model of car?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
so you are planning on charging an ev with the eu2200i?
what brand and model of car?
Thanks for your reply, Paul.

It's a Hyundai Kona EV. Just to provide a constant 1.4 kW load for the generator.

Without success, I connected the ground point to a metal stake more than a foot into the ground, and then, using a 75' extension cord to reach, (a) the ground pin of an outlet and (b) a metal water pipe going into the ground. I had to use a short clip lead to make the connections. All of these measured about 0.4v from the generator ground point.

I could move the generator closer to the water pipe. Do you think that's worth trying? Any other ideas?
 

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Thanks for your reply, Paul.

It's a Hyundai Kona EV. Just to provide a constant 1.4 kW load for the generator.

Without success, I connected the ground point to a metal stake more than a foot into the ground, and then, using a 75' extension cord to reach, (a) the ground pin of an outlet and (b) a metal water pipe going into the ground. I had to use a short clip lead to make the connections. All of these measured about 0.4v from the generator ground point.

I could move the generator closer to the water pipe. Do you think that's worth trying? Any other ideas?
what is the gauge on 75 foot cord?
is this for the power feed from the gen to the car charger?
or is the gen next to the car?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The immediate problem is solved.

What's the charger's specifications?
The power connection from the generator to the car is essentially a smart extension cord with an EV connector on the other end. It's speced to transfer up to 12A, 120v to the vehicle. The cord (called an EVSE) is what's refusing the connection and indicating a fault.

The generator manual specifies neutral floating.

Following a suggestion from the EV board, I connected a 50k resistor between neutral and ground on the generator output. This was enough to make the EVSE cord think that the generator has a bonded ground. It's now charging the car.

I had initially used a 100k resistor, which worked for someone with a different model EV and cord, but that failed.

There's less than 100 mV potential between the car's chassis and a grounded conduit. I hope that means there's no shock hazard.

I'm curious as to whether the generator can be operated as a bonded ground by connecting the neutral and ground, and whether there's any hazard in operating it the way I am doing it.

Next time I move the generator, I might try connecting the ground terminal to a metal water pipe and see if that makes the EVSE happy.
 
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