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Colt Carson said:
… my attic uses a powered fan at the very top of the roof to exhaust the hot attic air. ..
This has been extensively studied in several university papers and the end result was that any type of power roof fan system draws moisture and reduces the living space energy efficiency. The entire roof underside is foamed which results in a sealed envelope which also insulates the living space below attic. No gable vents, no soffit vents, the entire roof becomes a moisture and temperature barrier for the house below. Cooling costs are reduced also for the entire structure including 2 story homes.

Have done several homes with this method in tropical climates.

As for termites, they are always present, if not in your home, then down the street with a neighbor or public building(s). That is why we unconditionally tent each building about every decade at a simple cost of about 1k per building. It also clears other critters :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
I certainly would not place the generator on a concrete slab. Something like this, which is easier to move and better protects the generator:
There are all kinds of crazy HOA rules including it has to be concealed behind bushes. I like the raised idea. The problem is the the County has the right to move it whenever they need to and use whatever measure to do it, especially in an emergency like flooding. If I moved it, I would make sure it was moved carefully so the generator is not damaged. Unfortunately, if I locate the generator in the easement, I would not be able to do that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Other people here know more about this than I do, but I think a plumber is who would run the gas line. Also, I don’t know what the qualifications are of your generator installation company. Maybe they have it all covered. But $4K does sound like a lot to run a big wire and small pipe through an attic. I would definitely shop around.
Yeah, I think $4K extra is a lot too. The challenge is that the gas spicket is on the back of our home and the electrical box is on the right side of our home, but currently we only have permission to put the generator on the left side of our home.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
I understand the rear of the house faces a lake, but do you have any room back there at all? If so, maybe you could build/buy a shed for the generator to hide it. Lots of folks here have built sheds/shelters for their portable generators. Sheds also cut the noise way down.
Good thought. Our HOA will not allow it in the front or back of the home. Only the sides.
 

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hummm
how about a generator shack?
will they allow that in the back yard?
construct it like a tool shed.. maybe brick clad to the cement block to make it pretty.
just make it out of block and space it higher on the real floor inside.
then use a gen stack for the exhaust noise to go up and use the vortex cones to baffle the noise.
pm if you need links.
 

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FLGirl said:
If I moved it, I would make sure it was moved carefully so the generator is not damaged. Unfortunately, if I locate the generator in the easement, I would not be able to do that.
A platform with removable lifting casters would do it. Each corner of the base would have a liftpoint with an anchor. As the corner is jacked up a large caster/wheel is inserted. Then entire unit can be moved and process reversed to restore to desired location.

Wheel size can be optimized and weight of the platform/cast with generator is irrelevant. Image below is just for reference.
The actual wheel and attachment point(s) could be on the side (not underside) so liftpoints can be inserted at any angle and any soil condition, even if platform was under water.

Tire Camera accessory Wheel Font Flooring
 
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