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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just moved to Naples, Florida and want to install a whole house generator. Selected a Generac dealer and decided on a 22W size generator. Going thru the permitting process I discovered I have a 7.5' Drainage Easement along the side of my one story house where my electrical & gas are located. Collier County rejected the permit. The Generac dealer then suggested I sign an Easement Use Agreement and resubmit to the County, but I am not comfortable with that since that gives them the right to move our Generac if they need to maintain, repair, or add more to the Easement. And this would be at my expense each time this occurs! So then the Generac dealer said we could put the generator on the other side of the house but since there is no access to gas there, they would have to run the gas thru our attic and over to the other side of the house. Yikes! Is this my only option? HOA does not allow generators in the front yard and back yard is on a lake. Has anyone done this successfully? I can't be the only one dealing with Easement challenges. I appreciate your advice.
 

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In my experience, easements don't often see work done on them. Speak to your neighbors and HOA and see if anyone remembers the easements needing work done. Factor in the cost of temporarily disconnecting and moving the generator one time vs the cost to install the generator and gas line on the other side of your house. Also, I would not want a gas line in my attic.
 

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Some people are ok with natural gas in their house, and some aren’t. Since I have a couple of natural gas appliances, I have gas lines in my attic. I consider natural gas safer than propane, because a propane leak lingers in the lowest area, while a natural gas leak floats upwards. So if you did have a natural gas leak in your attic, with proper attic ventilation it would just rise and float away. It’s a personal decision, but I like being independent so I think in your situation I would run the utilities through the attic and not have any future worries. That is, if you intend to stay in that house.
 

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hoa can be a hand full.
some times good some times not so good.
take a look at the folks down west of you in LA.
they are placing BIG gens on aluminum stands raised off the ground.

if they use unions for the gas hard line at the house before the gen set whip hose.
and electric box shut off for the gen whip connection at the house.
i would think it would be easy to disconnect the gen for any service of utilities.

so how many times have they had to dig on that side of the house in the last 10-20 years?
i would make sure your home owners insurance cover's this easement...
part of the utility's insurance coverage.
that way you are not looking at a bill if they have to dig.

so what is the drainage easement?
it is underground culvert or pipe or an above ground feature?
do you have an basement? or is this a slab cabin / house?
how far above the water line is the house / cabin?
 

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florida = most are slab houses.
elevation mostly not much above sea level, to as high as 345 feet in Britton Hill in the pan handle on the GA border
drainage easement again most are underground culvert down there
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
In my experience, easements don't often see work done on them. Speak to your neighbors and HOA and see if anyone remembers the easements needing work done. Factor in the cost of temporarily disconnecting and moving the generator one time vs the cost to install the generator and gas line on the other side of your house. Also, I would not want a gas line in my attic.
Thank you for your feedback. The neighborhood is only 3 years old so no work has been done in the easements. The generator would be on a concrete slab so moving it would be quite the hassle. Generac dealer told me putting it on the opposite side of the house and running gas line thru the attic would add about $4K to the job. :oops: Just curious why you would not want a gas line in your attic? Because it gets so hot up there? Fire hazard? Impacts insurance rates?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Some people are ok with natural gas in their house, and some aren’t. Since I have a couple of natural gas appliances, I have gas lines in my attic. I consider natural gas safer than propane, because a propane leak lingers in the lowest area, while a natural gas leak floats upwards. So if you did have a natural gas leak in your attic, with proper attic ventilation it would just rise and float away. It’s a personal decision, but I like being independent so I think in your situation I would run the utilities through the attic and not have any future worries. That is, if you intend to stay in that house.
Yes, we do intend to stay here as our retirement home and don't want to deal with power outages during storms. Sorry if this is a "girl question" ;) but since this Generac dealer is a Master Electrician, would they be the appropriate people to install gas line thru the attic?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
hoa can be a hand full.
some times good some times not so good.
take a look at the folks down west of you in LA.
they are placing BIG gens on aluminum stands raised off the ground.

if they use unions for the gas hard line at the house before the gen set whip hose.
and electric box shut off for the gen whip connection at the house.
i would think it would be easy to disconnect the gen for any service of utilities.

so how many times have they had to dig on that side of the house in the last 10-20 years?
i would make sure your home owners insurance cover's this easement...
part of the utility's insurance coverage.
that way you are not looking at a bill if they have to dig.

so what is the drainage easement?
it is underground culvert or pipe or an above ground feature?
do you have an basement? or is this a slab cabin / house?
how far above the water line is the house / cabin?
Our neighborhood is only 3 years old so no one has had to dig yet. The drainage easement is definitely underground and goes out to the lake in the back of our home. Probably a culvert? We have no basement. All of the generators I see around the neighborhood are installed on concrete slabs. I have seen pics online that show what they look like raised off the ground but the legs are still stabilized in concrete. Flooding in Florida is a big concern so when you say you want to do something near drainage, everyone freaks out. It might be easier in the long run to put it on the other side of the house, but I just want to make sure that is safe. It is 96 degrees here today, and I can only imagine how hot it is in the attic. Is it safe to have gas lines in that kind of heat?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
florida = most are slab houses.
elevation mostly not much above sea level, to as high as 345 feet in Britton Hill in the pan handle on the GA border
drainage easement again most are underground culvert down there
Yes, no basement and drainage easement is underground going out to a lake behind our house.
 

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Yes, we do intend to stay here as our retirement home and don't want to deal with power outages during storms. Sorry if this is a "girl question" ;) but since this Generac dealer is a Master Electrician, would they be the appropriate people to install gas line thru the attic?
Other people here know more about this than I do, but I think a plumber is who would run the gas line. Also, I don’t know what the qualifications are of your generator installation company. Maybe they have it all covered. But $4K does sound like a lot to run a big wire and small pipe through an attic. I would definitely shop around.
 

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Our house has had a natural gas line in the attic for over 50 years without any problems. We live on the Mississippi Gulf Coast so it is very hot in our attic!!

I would not let the attic worry affect your decision.
Jump
 

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FLGirl said:
Our neighborhood is only 3 years old .. .. It is 96 degrees here today, and I can only imagine how hot it is in the attic.
All local S Florida homes built during the last 10 years use foamed-in attics and 10% of air conditioning/cooling is routed into the attic. A recent home I visited had a folding service ladder (it collapses like an accordian) to access the attic so I climbed up and the temperature was 84 degrees at 14:00 hottest part of the day (it was also a 96 degree in-shade day and outside in the sun it was over 110 degrees.)

A very comfortable attic indeed.

Your construction standard should be similar unless builder did not follow statewide code.
 

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It is 96 degrees here today, and I can only imagine how hot it is in the attic. Is it safe to have gas lines in that kind of heat?
Yes. All of our NG lines in the attic are black iron/steel. Galvanized steel was not allowed years ago but is now allowed in some areas. Copper, brass or CSST (Corrugated Stainless Steel Tubing) is NOT allowed as far as I know in an attic in our area. While some areas do allow CSST in the attic, I would prefer black iron. Certainly, polyethylene is not allowed.

The attic heat is a non-factor. We regularly have shade temps over 100F with attic temps reaching 150F. No problem for black iron pipe.

On a side note, pipe dope best to for sealing threaded joints...not Teflon (or thread seal) tape. And bonding the gas piping to the electrical grounding system is a requirement in many jurisdictions for lightning protection.

Of course, your local gas code will determine what is or isn’t allowed in your area.

since this Generac dealer is a Master Electrician, would they be the appropriate people to install gas line thru the attic?
No. A licensed plumber is appropriate and then you don't have to worry about what is allowed and what is not...they would know. The Generac dealer/installer may have a licensed plumber on staff or sub it out to a plumber.
 

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I understand the rear of the house faces a lake, but do you have any room back there at all? If so, maybe you could build/buy a shed for the generator to hide it. Lots of folks here have built sheds/shelters for their portable generators. Sheds also cut the noise way down.
 

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All local S Florida homes built during the last 10 years use foamed-in attics and 10% of air conditioning/cooling is routed into the attic. A recent home I visited had a folding service ladder (it collapses like an accordian) to access the attic so I climbed up and the temperature was 84 degrees at 14:00 hottest part of the day (it was also a 96 degree in-shade day and outside in the sun it was over 110 degrees.)

A very comfortable attic indeed.

Your construction standard should be similar unless builder did not follow statewide code.
I never understood why you would air-condition a non-living space (attic). Seems like a waste… my attic uses a powered fan at the very top of the roof to exhaust the hot attic air. The only issue with mine is the fan motors are all made in China, so they use bushings instead of bearings. I thought about getting the underside of my roof decking spray foamed. Then I heard of two different friends that got Formosan termites because of the spray foam. They unknowingly developed a roof leak which couldn’t be seen because of the spray foam. The water ran down between the decking and foam, and down the wall. The wet wood is a dinner bell for the termites. If you have wet wood, the Formosan termites don’t need to go to the ground. So your perimeter chemical treatment or bait stations may go unnoticed, as the termites have what they need up in the roof and wall. Pest control companies seem to be getting away from insuring houses with spray foam, in my area at least. Sorry to get off track, I just wanted to share the information.
 

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The generator would be on a concrete slab so moving it would be quite the hassle.
I certainly would not place the generator on a concrete slab. Something like this, which is easier to move and better protects the generator:
 
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