Power Equipment Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I recently added another old champion compressor to the line up. Date on the tank is 1949. Cast on pump is maybe model# 6e or se? Has an old wagner 1.5hp repulsion motor on it. Anyone need that motor?I'm unable to identify the pump model#. I will be upgrading that. Any help will be greatly appreciated.
Liquid Aqua Font Chemical compound Transparency


Green Grass Gas Terrestrial plant Machine

Font Gas Wood Metal Number
Waste containment Road surface Asphalt Cylinder Gas
 

Attachments

· Registered
Joined
·
566 Posts
DaveKurey,

Amazing two stage with 1.5 HP motor? that is amazing how they built things in the past. Since you are upgrading I would start with a hydrostatic test of the tank before I bought any new parts. Its easy to do just google how to do it, here is just one video and there are many to find out there:



Stephen
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
DaveKurey,

Amazing two stage with 1.5 HP motor? that is amazing how they built things in the past. Since you are upgrading I would start with a hydrostatic test of the tank before I bought any new parts. Its easy to do just google how to do it, here is just one video and there are many to find out there:



S
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the video. I will definitely use caution when I fill the tank. The 1½ hp motor does seems odd on a 2 stage. I wonder if hp ratings have changed over the years. The motor tag says the motor draws 16½ amps on 110vac. I was told it runs slow. I pulled and cleaned the valves today. Borescoped the cylinders and drained oil. Oil was pretty nasty so I dumped some kerosene in crankcase and swished it around and drained. This rig doesn't have an unloader valve. The limited general information I've found says that's why the air is pumped through the base. Idk, it must soften the start up.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
566 Posts
DaveKurey,

Older electric motors weren't as efficient as they are today, energy was cheap back then,16amps or so sounds about right for a 1.5 HP 120 Vac motor. Did you take the head off to see the bores? This pump may be OK to use as is with a 2-3HP+ modern electric motor but of course that would require 240 volts AC. Make sure the tank is safe before going any further. The pump has rating for speed and CFM output. I don't see any indication of the model pump but there can't be too many 1.5 HP two stage pumps Champion made back then. The R10D model comes to mind, that pump can run from 400 to 1050 rpm based on HP of the motor used.


Stephen
Gas Cameras & optics Camera accessory Machine Engineering
 

· Registered
Joined
·
566 Posts
Davekurey,

Your pump doesn't have a centrifugal/pneumatic unloader valve like they have on the big boy compressors. This function is always needed and used. In modern and cheaper compressors they use another method to limit/vent startup pressure resistance. In your case the unloader valve should be on the electrical pressure switch, it is piped between the pump output tube (check valve input side) and the electric pressure switch relief valve. As long as your check valve is good and has a pipe threaded port for a relief valve connection, there should be no problems venting the fill tube after pressure switch cuts off. Connection to the "input" side of the check valve, prevents the pressurized tank air from escaping past the check valve into the unloader valve which is to opened after filling the tank to vent the fill tube to the outside. Does this make any sense to you?

Font Auto part Screenshot Automotive wheel system Science

Stephen

Thanks for the video. I will definitely use caution when I fill the tank. The 1½ hp motor does seems odd on a 2 stage. I wonder if hp ratings have changed over the years. The motor tag says the motor draws 16½ amps on 110vac. I was told it runs slow. I pulled and cleaned the valves today. Borescoped the cylinders and drained oil. Oil was pretty nasty so I dumped some kerosene in crankcase and swished it around and drained. This rig doesn't have an unloader valve. The limited general information I've found says that's why the air is pumped through the base. Idk, it must soften the start up.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
566 Posts
Davekurey,

A release of high pressure air left in the fill tube would not stop a compressor from starting to pump air but the resistance of 200 psi+ could eventually burn up your motor and electrical contacts on the pressure switch. I once had a compressor that was built in the sixties that just had a pin hole in the input side of the check valve to vent any pressure left in the fill tube. The lost air while pumping in operation was negligible. The check valve prevented the backflow of air pressure out the vent, built up in the tank at the end of a fill cycle, it took a few seconds of a "hiss" that tapered off then stopped. There is no law that says that you can't add a fill tube relief system, could be why your motor runs slow (if it does, verify first). If you look at most compressors today the electrical pressure switch has a valve on the side of it for this feature and most check valves have a 1/8 or 1/4 pipe threaded port to connect to it. A stop by Harbor Freight and checking out compressors they sell you will see they all have some type of fill tube venting. In the picture that was posted it looks like there is a copper pipe coming out of the pressure switch, maybe it's something else? Just a solid wire? Maybe pipe was removed in error? Sometimes the check valve clogs or leaks tank back pressure and they think the constantly venting relief valve is the culprit so, not knowing what to do, they plug it! never fixing the source of the problem (a leaking check valve)

Stephen

Wood Cylinder Font Auto part Audio equipment

Yes, makes sense unfortunately mine doesn't have anything like that. No smaller tubes anywhere. It does have a brass safety valve which I removed to clean n shine.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Davekurey,

A release of high pressure air left in the fill tube would not stop a compressor from starting to pump air but the resistance of 200 psi+ could eventually burn up your motor and electrical contacts on the pressure switch. I once had a compressor that was built in the sixties that just had a pin hole in the input side of the check valve to vent any pressure left in the fill tube. The lost air while pumping in operation was negligible. The check valve prevented the backflow of air pressure out the vent, built up in the tank at the end of a fill cycle, it took a few seconds of a "hiss" that tapered off then stopped. There is no law that says that you can't add a fill tube relief system, could be why your motor runs slow (if it does, verify first). If you look at most compressors today the electrical pressure switch has a valve on the side of it for this feature and most check valves have a 1/8 or 1/4 pipe threaded port to connect to it. A stop by Harbor Freight and checking out compressors they sell you will see they all have some type of fill tube venting. In the picture that was posted it looks like there is a copper pipe coming out of the pressure switch, maybe it's something else? Just a solid wire? Maybe pipe was removed in error? Sometimes the check valve clogs or leaks tank back pressure and they think the constantly venting relief valve is the culprit so, not knowing what to do, they plug it! never fixing the source of the problem (a leaking check valve)

Stephen

View attachment 13670
Ok, thanks for the great info. I uploaded another pic of model #. Unfortunately I can't find much info on older champions. I think it's an SE-14.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
566 Posts
Davekurey,

Physics do not change over time, the newer Champion R-10D probably has the same bore x stroke and RPM ratings, it is probably based on the earlier pump design. I would run the pump at 500 rpm with a 1.5HP/1725 rpm motor and pump at 1000rpm with a 3HP/1725 rpm motor. The 1725 motors have double the torque of the 3450 rpm motors. You can use a 3450 rpm motor, just halve the drive pulley size. Use the link below to calculate what size drive motor pulley will be required to achieve the desired pump rpm, its a neat and fun tool!


Stephen

Ok, thanks for the great info. I uploaded another pic of model #. Unfortunately I can't find much info on older champions. I think it's an SE-14.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top