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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

New here (another Torontonian without power).

I can't see why this is a bad idea, but I thought I'd ask:

My Ridgid Honda powered 7000 has a bolt on the chassis that requires a ground. Can I run a ground wire from that bolt inside my house to the ground on the cold water pipe?

All wiring was redone to code in 2010.

Thanks
 

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I wouldn't bond to the water pipe either.

Tell us more about how you're connecting your generator. Are you plugging directly into it or using a transfer switch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
For now, I'm plugging the gas furnace and hot water heater (gas, instant on), directly into the generator. I'm running the Ridgid's umbilical cord into the house. Gen is about 75' away outside.
Thought I could also run a copper ground wire from the gen frame (there is a ground lug) into the furnace room where there is a ground attached to a copper pipe.

I may get a transfer switch installed later, which would avoid all this. Just thinking about cost, as I may never need to use the gen again.

Thanks
 

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For what you're doing if there was a problem and there was a short to ground then you'd be protected via the ground in your cord set.

Instead of a transfer switch consider an interlock. I'm not talking the "interlockkit.com" ones but one from your panel manufacturer. They are MUCH cheaper and let you select any circuit to run. Check with your AHJ to see if they're approved for your location.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
For what you're doing if there was a problem and there was a short to ground then you'd be protected via the ground in your cord set.

Instead of a transfer switch consider an interlock. I'm not talking the "interlockkit.com" ones but one from your panel manufacturer. They are MUCH cheaper and let you select any circuit to run. Check with your AHJ to see if they're approved for your location.
Thanks, but with an interlock I have to manually balance power distribution (from a 240V input to 120V output), correct?
 

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Thanks, but with an interlock I have to manually balance power distribution (from a 240V input to 120V output), correct?
It's no different than a 6,8,10, whatever circuit transfer switch. You still have to plan your loads.

In my case it was $250 for a 6 circuit transfer switch, $40 for an interlock.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I would not!!
I am reading that you can do it, why do you recommend not to?

- connect 120V gas furnace to generator 120V GFCI plug
- connect suitable gauge ground wire from generator frame attachment point to cold water pipe ground (already exists inside home, near furnace)

What's wrong with this?

Note: pretty sure it has a bonded neutral, but since I won't be connecting to a transfer switch, this is what you want, bonded, correct?
 

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You want it bonded if you are plugging directly into the generator.

OSHA does not require a ground rod if you are using plug/cord connected equipment.

If there was a fault, the electricity wants to complete the circuit. A short will be from hot to neutral or hot to ground. Neutral and ground are at the same potential.

A ground rod in your residence it is primarily for lightning protection. The neutral and ground are bonded in your main panel.

The connection to a water pipe (bonding) is to make sure that the plumbing is at the same potential as the rest of the grounding system - so you don't touch the sink and dishwasher and get zapped for example. Not a problem if you are plugging things into the generator.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Thank you for the response!

The generator manual does say it needs to be grounded though... By connecting the ground screw on the frame to a rod buried in the ground.

So since I need to ground the gen to something, why not the cold water pipes, where I already see a copper wire ground?
 

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I don't see why not, my home is grounded to the copper water service and steel gas pipe....but if you want to be safe do the grounded rod thing,
 
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