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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
well, like every year we go to cruising the coast, the property we use has no power, so we need a gen set to run the pop up lights and everything else, with the motorhome only having 3 outlets on the out side their aint enough to run everything nor is one big enough to run a pop camper (need a 30rv plug)

so we have to have portable gen set for that stuff, and we know they are lound and most thend to be the gen its self making the noise not the exhaust note from the engine

i was getting tired of the racket, and raided a dumpster for plywood and leaned it up on all sides leaving a big hole on the muffler side for exhaust to come out and enough room to let air in to cool the engine and gen set and it was like night and day

so now that im home i building a portable shelter/sound box for it

it will be 1/4 ply wood with blue dow r4 styrofoam sheets inside, have a big hole on the back side (about 50% of the back) for ventalation for fresh air and lets exhaust out, it will just sit over the gen, put chest handles on it to install and remove it to cut off gen set or add gas and what not, a hole in one side for cords covered by a small rubber flap to help "seal" it

its pretty much the same principal as the storage compartment for a motorhome, it has an open bottom in its case for air...... its quiet inside the coach and outside, but if your outside and open the compartment door it gets LOUD

i think this will work good

IDEAS & THOUGHTS, GOOD OR BAD ARE WELCOME
 

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Looks like a great idea! Let us know how it works out. Are you sure it will get enough air to keep it from overheating? :eek:
 

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yeah try running a kohler twin powered genny with no muffler all i can say is good god that thing is loud. and after i turn it off all i say is huh? what did you say?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
i kept a close eye on it with the plywood leaning on it and it ran cool as normal .... i was also thinkin of adding a small 120v in wall fan to the box to blow air in since i got power right there

im not staring on it right away, its a plan hopefully to pull off before 2011, i got other projects too

i wanna try it out and see what it does, worst case i end up with some fire wood :D
 

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Discussion Starter #8
HAHAHAHA your funny

man i havent had time to even think much about it, i got the plans drawn up in my head and how im going to put it together, maybe ill get up to the hardware store and get the supplies soon
 

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i know what you mean about lack of time for projects my farmall has been sitting un touched for 2 months now and since i don't have a garage it now has to wait till spring. and since tomorrow is my day off from work i will be spending some quality time with my leaf blower its going to be a long day
 

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Here might be an easier and lighter weight option for you. A friend at work did this to cut the noise.

PVC for the frame, cut to size for the big rectangular ceiling tiles. Zip-tie the frames together. Makes for easy storage too.

Steve
 

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Discussion Starter #14
hmmm thats a good idea

did it work well to quite it up some

BTW WELCOME TO PEF!!!!
 

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1. Using a muffler
This method involves buying a super quiet generator muffler and fixing it to the exhaust pipe. Mufflers work by allowing exhaust air to pass through while limiting noise transmission. It forces air through splitters which in turn reduces the wavelength of sound thereby reducing its loudness. So, as your generator runs the muffler absorbs noise substantially making your unit quieter. However, since mufflers come in different sizes, some even designed for motorcycles, you should exercise caution while shopping for the same to ensure you acquire the model and size that will suit your generator. Ask the dealer for some guidance on how to muffle a generator and if the model you are considering will play the role. Generally, the bigger the muffler, the greater the noise reduction it will produce.

2. Build an enclosure
Hard walled surfaces restrict noise transmission by reflecting back the sound your generator produces making it significantly quiet. So, create generator baffle boxes using hard materials such as wood. Enclose your unit in the enclosure, making sure there is sufficient installation for it to run both safely and smoothly. Generators emit harmful gases, and since you will need to refill the fuel and service it from time to time, insulation is crucial. You do not have to hire the services of a skilled carpenter to adopt this method; there are many DIY (Do It Yourself) generator quiet box plans available online for you to use. Put into consideration your generator size and any other special requirement and construct a wooden house to reduce the noise your generator produces.


3. Insulate the Enclosure
Using a hard material to build a generator noise reduction box only restricts noise within the room. So, to reduce noise as well as reverberations inside the enclosure/plant room, you must insulate the space so that it can absorb sound. So, how will you achieve this objective? There are two ways. You can line the hard generator enclosure surface with sound-absorbing materials such as hardened foam, or you can install special acoustic wall panels on the inner walls and ceiling tiles for the top. Either way, you will adequately soundproof generator box thus reducing the noise your generator produces. Use the insulating material extensively within the enclosure, and your neighbors and family members will not even realize your generator is running. This approach works equally well for generators used for camping and tailgating.



4. Install it at a Distance
Increase the distance between your generator and home, camping location, the residential area or your customers, and you’ll be surprised by how much noise you can reduce. Consequently, this method is the most affordable (since it doesn’t involve purchasing any material) yet the most effective. When you move the unit far away, the sound wave travels over a greater, and as such loses lots energy along the way. The noise that finally reaches the community contains less acoustic intensity which implies that it will be of low volume. Every time you double the distance separating the unit and yourself, you reduce the noise level by six decibels. So, place it as far as possible, taking care not to position your generator at such a distance that it’ll be at risk of theft, damage or even meddling by antagonistic individuals.


5. Change the orientation of the exhaust pipe
Most people make the mistake of installing horizontal pipes that direct the noise the generator produces in a particular direction. If you are in a camp, and the exhaust accidentally points towards you or to another group, the noise can simply be unbearable. So, what is the solution? Modify the exhaust pipe to face upwards. Acquire an extension tube, bend it to face up and attach it to the end of your generator’s exhaust. Alternatively, if your generator is compact and portable, turn it around so that its exhaust is pointing upward. In such an orientation, your generator will channel the sound waves upwards, thus appearing less noise to people around it. You may only have to put up with a slight change in appearance, but the resulting substantial noise reduction is definitely worth the sacrifice.
 

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1. Using a muffler
This method involves buying a super quiet generator muffler and fixing it to the exhaust pipe. Mufflers work by allowing exhaust air to pass through while limiting noise transmission. It forces air through splitters which in turn reduces the wavelength of sound thereby reducing its loudness. So, as your generator runs the muffler absorbs noise substantially making your unit quieter. However, since mufflers come in different sizes, some even designed for motorcycles, you should exercise caution while shopping for the same to ensure you acquire the model and size that will suit your generator. Ask the dealer for some guidance on how to muffle a generator and if the model you are considering will play the role. Generally, the bigger the muffler, the greater the noise reduction it will produce.

2. Build an enclosure
Hard walled surfaces restrict noise transmission by reflecting back the sound your generator produces making it significantly quiet. So, create generator baffle boxes using hard materials such as wood. Enclose your unit in the enclosure, making sure there is sufficient installation for it to run both safely and smoothly. Generators emit harmful gases, and since you will need to refill the fuel and service it from time to time, insulation is crucial. You do not have to hire the services of a skilled carpenter to adopt this method; there are many DIY (Do It Yourself) generator quiet box plans available online for you to use. Put into consideration your generator size and any other special requirement and construct a wooden house to reduce the noise your generator produces.


3. Insulate the Enclosure
Using a hard material to build a generator noise reduction box only restricts noise within the room. So, to reduce noise as well as reverberations inside the enclosure/plant room, you must insulate the space so that it can absorb sound. So, how will you achieve this objective? There are two ways. You can line the hard generator enclosure surface with sound-absorbing materials such as hardened foam, or you can install special acoustic wall panels on the inner walls and ceiling tiles for the top. Either way, you will adequately soundproof generator box thus reducing the noise your generator produces. Use the insulating material extensively within the enclosure, and your neighbors and family members will not even realize your generator is running. This approach works equally well for generators used for camping and tailgating.



4. Install it at a Distance
Increase the distance between your generator and home, camping location, the residential area or your customers, and you’ll be surprised by how much noise you can reduce. Consequently, this method is the most affordable (since it doesn’t involve purchasing any material) yet the most effective. When you move the unit far away, the sound wave travels over a greater, and as such loses lots energy along the way. The noise that finally reaches the community contains less acoustic intensity which implies that it will be of low volume. Every time you double the distance separating the unit and yourself, you reduce the noise level by six decibels. So, place it as far as possible, taking care not to position your generator at such a distance that it’ll be at risk of theft, damage or even meddling by antagonistic individuals.


5. Change the orientation of the exhaust pipe
Most people make the mistake of installing horizontal pipes that direct the noise the generator produces in a particular direction. If you are in a camp, and the exhaust accidentally points towards you or to another group, the noise can simply be unbearable. So, what is the solution? Modify the exhaust pipe to face upwards. Acquire an extension tube, bend it to face up and attach it to the end of your generator’s exhaust. Alternatively, if your generator is compact and portable, turn it around so that its exhaust is pointing upward. In such an orientation, your generator will channel the sound waves upwards, thus appearing less noise to people around it. You may only have to put up with a slight change in appearance, but the resulting substantial noise reduction is definitely worth the sacrifice.
Will the muffler suggestion and any of the other suggestions work On a standby generator? Thanks.
 

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Will the muffler suggestion and any of the other suggestions work On a standby generator? Thanks.
welcome to the forum lyn!
first things first. a few questions ;
what make and model on your generator?
and is this generator to be mounted in a quiet box?

and how quite do you need your generator system?
and last what is your budget for the project?
 

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welcome to the forum lyn!
first things first. a few questions ;
what make and model on your generator?
and is this generator to be mounted in a quiet box?

and how quite do you need your generator system?
and last what is your budget for the project?
Thank you for responding and for the kind welcome! I am mostly green about standby generators. I don’t have one yet but would like to get one. But because I live in a condo association I have to submit All kinds of paperwork, pictures and diagrams and data in order to get it approved, (And they could still say no of course… But I’m trying to make the best case possible). I’m sure the sound level will be an issue as well as the placement. Thus my question as to whether a muffler can work with a standby generator and Also still be according to code. As far as placement, I’m hoping a short brick wall built behind it would enable me to install it closer to the house off the grass. (Meaning less than 18 inches). Because it’s for medical reasons, I am working with a program that gives grants. There’s a possibility I could be approved, but the program is ending in October… So I have to move as quick as I can. Their grants are usually a maximum of $5000-though they sometimes make exceptions and give a higher amount-but I don’t know how much higher. Everything would have to be installed according to code and the manufacturers recommendations. I’m thinking a 13 kW would be big enough. And I’d even be willing to go down to 10 kW if necessary. I just want to be sure a few lights, the heat and hot water, some medical equipment, PC and a microwave stay active in a power outage. We were out 13 days after one blizzard. Thanks so much for your feedback!
 

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I would assume its going to be a real challenge to get an approval in a condo community.

There isnt anything you can do to make a standby generator quieter except for locating it farther from the building or behind a wall that will reflect the sound.

The enclosure already has some sound attenuating materials and is configured in such a way to suppress noise.
 
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