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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone

Looking for a generator to charge up a standard size leisure battery once or twice a day.
Any advice on what sort of thing to be looking at
Thanks
 

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Maybe you could explain what a standard size leisure battery is first. How or where or in what application too... Dutchy
 

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Maybe you could explain what a standard size leisure battery is first. How or where or in what application too... Dutchy
Also, what is your price range? Wattage requirements? Will the job require an inverter?

Tell us a bit more about how you intend to use it. There are lots of great choices out there, although Iowa will have only one suggestion :cool:
 

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standard size leisure battery
You have to understand that most of us here are in the colonies, so speak to us as you would to a small child... I'm assuming you mean a caravan deep cycle battery. What group size?

For simple battery charging and small 230V loads in the UK, it's tough to beat a small Honda like the EU22i.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Maybe you could explain what a standard size leisure battery is first. How or where or in what application too... Dutchy
I was looking at these ones

Also, what is your price range? Wattage requirements? Will the job require an inverter?
It will be used to power a drinks cooler (running at 627W max @ 240V AC) yes will go though an inverter. But the drinks chiller will run off of the battery and the generator is there to power the battery not to power the device

You have to understand that most of us here are in the colonies, so speak to us as you would to a small child... I'm assuming you mean a caravan deep cycle battery. What group size?

For simple battery charging and small 230V loads in the UK, it's tough to beat a small Honda like the EU22i.
Yes they are indeed deep cycle! and Not CCA (cold cranking amps)
But I have read on the net that generator DC out puts are not desined to charge batteries up! because the DC out put has limited power out put meaning it would take houes to charge a battery and has no voltage regulator so can damage the battery. instead they advice that you buy a smart battery charger and run it off of the AC out put to charge your battery (utter utter total ****ing stupidness and defets the object of buying a generator!)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
For simple battery charging and small 230V loads in the UK, it's tough to beat a small Honda like the EU22i.
I just spoke to my local generator shop about that modal
They said it had 8.3Amp max output on the DC (8.3amp X 12V) 99.6W
And the generator is rated at max out put of 2200W.
Again complete and utter stupid and defets the object of buying a generator to charge batteries up!
 

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Generators produce AC voltage. The DC your using is just designed to control the output of the generator. Some designs allow for borrowing that DC current to charge batteries.

FYI even the alternator on your car produces AC voltage. It's just rectified to DC.



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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
FYI even the alternator on your car produces AC voltage. It's just rectified to DC.
Yer I know! But they use a series and parallel of diodes to force the current in one direction (commonly know as DC) and then onto a regulator to regulate voltage.

So they do it with cars all these years no problem; why not on generators?
 

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well you can just buy a car or truck alternator and a engine that is 13+ hp
and do the 130 to 250 amps of dc charge...
think ambulance alt or BIG machinery alt.
use a honda gx390 late version with fuel injection..
 

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Yer I know! But they use a series and parallel of diodes to force the current in one direction (commonly know as DC) and then onto a regulator to regulate voltage.

So they do it with cars all these years no problem; why not on generators?
Because its use would be extremely limited. Its 100% possible, but its vastly more useful to have Ac. Also, 12v DC takes massive amperage to move the same power as 220v. It's cheaper and more efficient to just convert and regulate it. (IE a batt charger that costs $11)

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Maybe look into generators (generators generate DC, alternators generate AC, gotta love the English language sometimes.) designed for off grid living. e.g. charging large batteries, perhaps they have a built in battery charging feature. Little I know about them those "generators" provide AC to ultimately charge batteries which in turn powers an inverter for AC. I know nothing about off grid systems other than the heart is a large battery bank charged by solar, wind, hydro or moto driven "generator." Alternately, if it's just occasional use, e.g. camping, provide a connection to your vehicle and let the alternator charge the battery. Not efficient and maybe not great for the vehicle long term as some don't like sitting and idling.
 

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Looking for a generator to charge up a standard size leisure battery once or twice a day.
Any advice on what sort of thing to be looking at
Batteries are charged by a battery charger. Said battery chargers are powered by A/C current. That A/C current can be supplied by an A/C generator. I believe our work here is done...
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
well you can just buy a car or truck alternator and a engine that is 13+ hp
and do the 130 to 250 amps of dc charge...
think ambulance alt or BIG machinery alt.
use a honda gx390 late version with fuel injection..
That might have to be the last option since they dont custom make them like they should do
But its getting the engine to connect the the alternator will be the problem
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Alternately, if it's just occasional use, e.g. camping, provide a connection to your vehicle and let the alternator charge the battery. Not efficient and maybe not great for the vehicle long term as some don't like sitting and idling.
Using the engine of the van to charge the battery is ok if allways on the move but if static then its a lot of wasted fuel
 

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just belt drive on the gx and automotive dc alt.

the cool thing is you can run some at lower engine speed to get the spin up you need.
look in to the japan alts...
nipondenso and some of the others make a low power requirement alt.
we use them on skidloaders etc.
self contained regulation.
30 amp to 150 amp range on the power.
most are at 13.8-14.2 volts dc

there is also wilson brand industrial alts.
kinda pricy... but they are overbuilt!
and they take a larger engine to drive them.

take a look at this site here in the states
i am sure there are places like the over there in the uk as well.
pm me if you do not find one.

weld up an aluminum frame to keep it light weight.
a couple of v belt pulley's and a good belt and bob's your uncle.
 

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Are there any you can recomend please?
I like the Noco units, but really battery chargers are all pretty basic. Just get one thats "smart" or microprocessor controlled. That way it cuts off at the correct voltages.
Also, if you wish to pursue the gasoline driven alternator route, any machine shop worth their sign can make up a threaded-taper adapter to drive an alternator directly (saving the hassle of belt driven)

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