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Discussion Starter #1
We recently purchased a FIRMAN Power Equipment H07552 from costco. We also just moved into a new home I had prewired with a 40 amp breaker.

I didn't have the generator at the time but figured 40 amp would be fine and most of the generators I was looking at were all about 40 amps as well.

I've included a pic of the connector from the breaker as well. Is it ok to use this generators 50 amp connection with the 40 amp break and this connector or do i need to change them out?

Also I'm wanting this to power 2 floor freezers and 2 refrigerators, heating (for winter) and AC (in summer) as well as some lights in the home and a cpap machine and heating elements for a lizard. I should be ok with this unit?

Thanks for the help
 

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Your picture seems to show 3 electrical contacts. I would typically expect that to be for 110V from the generator, not 220V from the generator. Getting 220V from the generator would typically require 4 electrical contacts.

Is it definitely a 220V transfer switch? With a 50A output from the generator, that is definitely a 220V output.

Anyways, don't change your 40A breaker to 50A. If the actual wiring is only rated for 40A, then using all-50A breakers is unsafe, you risk overloading and overheating the wiring. If it was wired for 40A, and the wiring is sized for 40A, then leave the 40A breaker. Whichever one trips first will protect you. The house's 40A will trip, rather than the generator's 50A, which should be OK.

So you'll get 40A max from the generator, which is 8800W. That's pretty close to the unit's 9400W max (on gas), so you're not limiting yourself much anyhow.

Is the AC a window unit, or a whole-house unit? If it's a window unit, you should be fine with 40A and 220V. What kind of heat? I'm assuming oil or natural gas. If it's electric heat, that's a different story, that would be a much higher draw. I'm assuming the hot water is not electric.
 

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Your picture seems to show 3 electrical contacts. I would typically expect that to be for 110V from the generator, not 220V from the generator. Getting 220V from the generator would typically require 4 electrical contacts.
That's a 4 conductor Hubbell 50A 240V inlet. The ground conductor is on the radius at the bottom of the picture, easier seen on the cord end:

Also, the Amp/Watt rating is likely at 240V, not at 220V. 40A @ 240V is 9600W, so should handle the full generator output.
 

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Great, thanks. I did see the other contact, but wasn't sure what it was, as this plug wasn't something I'm familiar with. Sorry for the misleading info.
 

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I will have to double check with electrical guys and see what they actually wired for. But that connector is a 50 amp? Because i had initially stold them 40 or 50 amps but thought we settled on 40...

We have gas heat, water and house ac unit.

So wiring and connections aside this generator should run the house fine?
 

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I will have to double check with electrical guys and see what they actually wired for. But that connector is a 50 amp? Because i had initially stold them 40 or 50 amps but thought we settled on 40...

We have gas heat, water and house ac unit.

So wiring and connections aside this generator should run the house fine?
You probably decided on a 40A breaker, but for smaller size connectors they're only rated 15A/20A/30A/50A, so you ended up with the 50A (good). You should be fine with that generator for your critical loads with maybe just a little startup load management with all the circuit breakers.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I will have to double check with electrical guys and see what they actually wired for. But that connector is a 50 amp? Because i had initially stold them 40 or 50 amps but thought we settled on 40...

We have gas heat, water and house ac unit.

So wiring and connections aside this generator should run the house fine?
You probably decided on a 40A breaker, but for smaller size connectors they're only rated 15A/20A/30A/50A, so you ended up with the 50A (good). You should be fine with that generator for your critical loads with maybe just a little startup load management with all the circuit breakers.
Ok cool so what type of cable do i need for it to connect from the 50amp port on the generator and then to the connector for the panel pictured earlier?

Will need about a 15ft long cable as well because they put the outside connector in wrong place.
 

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Ok cool so what type of cable do i need for it to connect from the 50amp port on the generator and then to the connector for the panel pictured earlier?

Will need about a 15ft long cable as well because they put the outside connector in wrong place.
I believe you'll need that Hubbell CS6364C connector pictured above at the structure inlet side, and a NEMA 14-50P for the generator end. It's a short run, so 8AWG is acceptable. 6AWG would be the gold standard. Check to see what gauge they used from the inlet to the breaker.
 

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