Power Equipment Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone, I'm new to the forum and need some help. I have a Generac xg8000e that's about 10yrs old. It's always done well and never given me a problem until now. This weekend we were hit with an ice storm and the lights went out so I fired up the old generator and all was good. My wife wasn't thinking and I forgot to turn off the breaker, turned on one eye on the stove. Now at first it did turn the stove on with really no problems and then all of a sudden everything went dark. I thought we had just tripped a breaker but come to find out now I'm only getting 120v from 1 terminal of the 240v outlet. I can talk shop all day long about a lawnmower but I'm dumb as a box of rocks messing with a generator so any help is greatly appreciated. They are calling for more ice tomorrow so I'm gonna try to do some looking around this evening. TIA.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
264 Posts
Hello everyone, I'm new to the forum and need some help. I have a Generac xg8000e that's about 10yrs old. It's always done well and never given me a problem until now. This weekend we were hit with an ice storm and the lights went out so I fired up the old generator and all was good. My wife wasn't thinking and I forgot to turn off the breaker, turned on one eye on the stove. Now at first it did turn the stove on with really no problems and then all of a sudden everything went dark. I thought we had just tripped a breaker but come to find out now I'm only getting 120v from 1 terminal of the 240v outlet. I can talk shop all day long about a lawnmower but I'm dumb as a box of rocks messing with a generator so any help is greatly appreciated. They are calling for more ice tomorrow so I'm gonna try to do some looking around this evening. TIA.
Was that 240v outlet you tested in your house? If not, you need to test it at the generator.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
264 Posts
I checked the outlet at the generator.
Check the two 120V outlets that are mounted next to each other. Each one is on a separate phase. Do both of them produce 120V?
If each one has 120V then you need to open the outlet panel and check for a disconnected wire.
Does this generator have a 2 pole breaker for the 240 outlet?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Check the two 120V outlets that are mounted next to each other. Each one is on a separate phase. Do both of them produce 120V?
If each one has 120V then you need to open the outlet panel and check for a disconnected wire.
Does this generator have a 2 pole breaker for the 240 outlet?
Ok will check that first. It only has the push button breakers for the 20A 120v receptacles. Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Old man you were on the money. I had power to both 120v receptacles so as I dug deeper I found that when the factory assembled the circuit breakers they use push on spade terminals with splitters and one of them apparently got pushed on between the metal terminal and the plastic shield so when it got hot it melted the plastic and the terminal came loose . Thanks for the help. I greatly appreciate it .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
264 Posts
Old man you were on the money. I had power to both 120v receptacles so as I dug deeper I found that when the factory assembled the circuit breakers they use push on spade terminals with splitters and one of them apparently got pushed on between the metal terminal and the plastic shield so when it got hot it melted the plastic and the terminal came loose . Thanks for the help. I greatly appreciate it .
So, you're back in business? Great. Glad I could help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts
I found that when the factory assembled the circuit breakers they use push on spade terminals with splitters and one of them apparently got pushed on between the metal terminal and the plastic shield so when it got hot it melted the plastic and the terminal came loose .
So you got a loose live wire inside the metal box behind the control panel, it looking for any opportunity to make contact with the frame, and you. That's gonna' hurt, but only for a moment. That sounds...no, yeah...THAT'S MESSED UP AS A SOUP SANDWICH RIGHT THERE. 8000 watts of fry your azz in a New York minute, and Generac assembles it with electrical components designed sufficient only to wire a boat trailer. Who they got puttin' these things together over there anyway? The numb nutz behind the amps out of work roadies for the Grateful Dead?

I've got the XP8000E. Generac: Absolutely not a fan. Guess I'll put it back up on the lift and go back through the connections again. Vote of no confidence.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
264 Posts
So you got a loose live wire inside the metal box behind the control panel, it looking for any opportunity to make contact with the frame, and you. That's gonna' hurt, but only for a moment. That sounds...no, yeah...THAT'S MESSED UP AS A SOUP SANDWICH RIGHT THERE. 8000 watts of fry your azz in a New York minute, and Generac assembles it with electrical components designed sufficient only to wire a boat trailer. Who they got puttin' these things together over there anyway? The numb nutz behind the amps out of work roadies for the Grateful Dead?

I've got the XP8000E. Generac: Absolutely not a fan. Guess I'll put it back up on the lift and go back through the connections again. Vote of no confidence.
Assembly issues can happen with any product from any manufacturer. It happens. Quality control is not imperfect. I worked 36 years in manufacturing making the aluminum that is used to build the airplanes you fly on to go from point A to point B.
Defects happen. Sometimes materials were found to be defective after being installed and put through many hours of stress.
By the way, I was an aircraft mechanic, jet over two (more than two jet engines) in the Air Force and we dealt with many manufacturing defects in replacement parts used to repair our aircraft.
I agree, quality control is an important part of manufacturing, especially in this case where an electrocution hazard may exist. Something like this can happen with any product from any manufacturer.
Inspect your generator, you will sleep better tomorrow night.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts
Old Man, that a seasoned aviation/jet mechanic would express such a laid-back, seemingly flippant attitude to aircraft quality control gives me great pause in consideration of my next flight. I KNOW that you hold yourself to high standards, but it is your expression of this thought that gives me pause. I am of the opinion that in some things there is NO margin for error. Generator safety transcends something like cat food manufacturing. Consider choosing a peanut butter versus choosing a brain surgeon, if I ever need one. I hope he would hold himself to a exceedingly high standard. Peanut butter, not so much. My fault is I recognize that by employing careful due diligence it is not that hard to do it right the first time, and have come to expect that others can do it too...if they only cared. Where was the quality control by Generac when the shovel connector was fastened incorrectly?

There is a difference between stress failure due to age or design (latent vice) and an assembly person just not caring enough to make sure the shovel connector is put on the spade correctly, otherwise called a defect in workmanship. That is what this is. Forgive me if I'd rather not need an attorney because of latent vice or defective workmanship. I just want a safe generator. You know, the old proverb, "For the want of a nail..."

My brother-in-law was Flight Engineer on an Air Force Two, corporate jet mechanic, and is a very active mechanic in the vintage war aircraft realm. Pretty sure that there are a bunch of pilots who are thankful that he holds himself to a higher standard.

Regarding your suggestion that I should do the quality assurance inspection of my own generator so that I will sleep well tonight...following your logic, should the flying public inspect the planes too?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Ground Fault...have you never made a mistake in your life? If not, then you are not human. You can put all the procedures in place, but there will be still defects. The better the procedures, the less defects in assembly. But there will always be a small percentage. I've been around manufacturing for 25 years - and even though we have ISO standards and very strict procedures in place, we still get a defect rate under 1%. That is not perfect...and sometimes those defects are out of your control (other vendors components you are using in your product).

Good design, good procedures and random testing of products off the assembly line will no doubt reduce the defect rate and the DOA rate. But it will never be perfect until humans are perfect.

-J
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts
I am a walking mistake, I know it, and I spend my days trying to be more like my Maker. Your logic is sound. There are attorneys that make millions every day by using the same logic in court. They wouldn't make as much, IF the manufacturers put the shovel connectors on right. Given the choice, I'll take a generator with the shovel connectors put on as designed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
893 Posts
Old Man, that a seasoned aviation/jet mechanic would express such a laid-back, seemingly flippant attitude to aircraft quality control gives me great pause in consideration of my next flight.
Especially in a Triple-7? Kudos to the flight crew...
 
  • Like
Reactions: Old man here
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top