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on long island, ny friend was without power for 2 weeks after hurricane sandy. vowing never agaim, he purchased a generac whole house unit,natural gas powered. . other than the automatic monthly test, it got no use. he is a locomotive machinist, and follows factory maintenance to the letter. 2 years ago we had storm isias. my power was out 2 hrs, his 2 days. on day 2 his generator blew up. the camshaft broke, motor locked up. the sudden lock up also destroyed the generator itself, couldnt even replace the motor to make it work. he called generac and they told him it was not for continuous use, it was for intermittent use. he couldnt believe his ears. he also told me it ran at 3600 rpm. i was really suprised, why wouldnt it be built for 1800 rpm, instead of 3600 like an el cheapo 2 pole unit from home depot? are they really that crappy?
 

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Until an autopsy of what happened is done, it's hard to say how it failed. Maybe it ran low on oil? Maybe the intake vents got clogged and the engine overheated? Maybe the NG mixture it too rich and caused it to run hotter than normal? Maybe there's already an inherent factory defect?

Some Generac owners have claimed that they have ran their's for weeks on end without any problems. So maybe it's just the luck of the draw (read: maybe he got a lemon)?
 

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Some folks have disparaged Generac as 'Generjunk". I have followed many discussions over the past 10 years, and would always choose Kohler or Cummins for a standby generator based on what I have read.
 

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mhooker32
you do get what you pay for in a gen set.
yea a 1800 rpm is the gold standard.
and yes there are good solid NG 1800 units.

but you know when you buy one. well over the $20K usd price point.

i prefer the honda eu7000is inverter gens if you set them up right they work well.
and yes you can stack these in parallel for more power.

not a fan of generac equipment in any form for fleet use as of 09/2022...
just not my brand of choice for good equipment.

in the real good class is cat.
most of the cities in my area of the usa have now switched to cat in diesel and NG for solid backup power.
expensive but worth the bucks!
and are the new gold standard in prime power.
the city here has added 23 new cat gens in the last 5 years.
water, hospital, fire dept, sewer, police dept, phone company, several of the cell towers.
and now they are working on some city grid like street lights as well.
 

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the good part tab if you are handy and good with electronics you can convert the eu7000is to an auto stand by gen set.
Of course, but that's not for the average homeowner who cannot even maintain it, less convert & configure it.
 

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I have a 1995 model generac 8kw standby unit on my. I bought it used in 1998 from my employer. It's been in service on my house since 1999. Its had few issues in the 23 years its been in service. The most recent were this spring I had to replace the AVR, the main breaker, the DPE breaker and installed new brushes and cleaned the slip rings. The engine on this unit is a true Briggs engine and has been solid all this time.

If I had to replace it tomorrow I'm not sure what manufacture I'd go with. There are certainly some horror stories on all units across all manufactures that are out there now.
 

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My two neighbors have Generac whole house 3600 rpm units. One turns on every Wednesday at noon, and the other one turns on every Thursday at 10:45 AM. It looks like a third neighbor recently added a whole house unit that turns on every Saturday at 10:30 AM. Not sure if it's a Generac, but it sounds like the others in terms of noise. I now consider myself an expert on Generac noise identification.

My Honda EU7000is purrs compared to these whole house units. If I ever move and get one of those larger units, it will be a Cummins 1800 rpm liquid cooled RS25 model. Under a prolonged outage, I don't want a screamer running at 3600 rpm that will likely disintegrate after a few days of continuous use.
 

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My two neighbors have Generac whole house 3600 rpm units. One turns on every Wednesday at noon, and the other one turns on every Thursday at 10:45 AM. It looks like a third neighbor recently added a whole house unit that turns on every Saturday at 10:30 AM. Not sure if it's a Generac, but it sounds like the others in terms of noise. I now consider myself an expert on Generac noise identification.

My Honda EU7000is purrs compared to these whole house units. If I ever move and get one of those larger units, it will be a Cummins 1800 rpm liquid cooled RS25 model. Under a prolonged outage, I don't want a screamer running at 3600 rpm that will likely disintegrate after a few days of continuous use.
Large generators do not have to be loud. My ex Employer has a 250KW Cummins diesel 3 phase backing up the data center building. Noise during operation is way less than the home screamers we keep for the same purpose. Had to be within about 50 feet to hear it at all. I was there when it was installed. I think the budget for the thing was in the 100 thousand range. That included the 13 yard concrete pad, containing security wall, and all the equipment associated with the system. Worked good and is still working well at last report.
 

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That sounds like an oil issue for sure.

I've not heard good things about the Generac Guardian line of generators of late model vintage. I don't have first hand experience with them, but they are getting a reputation for issues with QC. I second Kohler. I have friends who have one and they've used it twice for long-term outages after storms. It worked well for them.
 

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Hey everyone! Long time, no see. WTH are all you new people anyway? To the OP...I am an owner of a Generac XP8000E, so I feel compelled to get my dog in this hunt. My Generac has only been lightly used. Although I have had only a leaky gas tank problem with it (AS IF a leaky gas tank is not a big problem), I have little confidence that it will sustain me through any extended period when I would need it most. So, I did what has been suggested above: I bought a Honda EU7000is, and keep the Generac as a prayerful back-up. (AS IF a Honda needs a back-up! :LOL::ROFLMAO::LOL:) Once I got the Honda broken in and perfected its use I became a light user of this forum. I learned a ton on this forum, and I spent a ton of time monitoring it. Now that I have the confidence of having a Honda as suggested above, I have been able to move on to the next thing. I no longer worry about anything generator. Hope you can get the taste of the word Generac out of your mouth, and attain the same nirvana most Honda owners have attained.
 

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Executive summary:
Generac standby's would be ideal if your authorized service dealer (ASD) ran it and was fully responsible for it, and you only needed it for small outages of a few hours each year, and you paid the full ante for it (initial cost, installation, and service). You'd probably get the full warranty (up to 7 years) of life out ot it, and it would be truly automatic.

If anything varies out of that very narrow range of ideal conditions for running a Generac ... then it's perhaps best to not be running a Generac.

Gory details:
Having run a Generac 7042 22kw for a year or so, in an off-grid fashion, I found them to last about 1500 to 2000 hrs before something blows up that most of us won't be able to repair. I also found that these need to be cared for by an authorized service dealer who lives nearby, within a small service range of X miles, as Generac does not want you to work on them, and locks critical info behind it's ASD's.

For $4k to 5k, installed and supported myself, I was hoping for more longevity for that kind of money, but, alas ...

I ran mine for approx 3 to 4 hours per day, and did the usual oil changes, valve adjustments, and such. I have an inverter/battery-bank in between generator & house, so I don't need to run continuously. It was extremely nice that the inverter started/stopped the generator as needed.

If I did run "continuously" (no inverter/battery-bank, or quiet period during sleeping of 8 hours out of 24), it would need to be stopped 1 hour in 24, for cooldown and maintenance checks, and maintenance schedules observed for 50-hour or thereabout oil changes, and other levels of scheduled "A" and "B" maintenance tasks.

When I got nearer the 2k hour mark on my unit, the rotor/stator combo went out; engine still seems strong. Up to this point, I'd been able to step through the complexity and fix the little stuff. With this major repair error code, and no access to the field manual, the unit was now dead in the water; the rotor/stator was probably in the $1k to 2k or more range anyway, so not sure of the value in repairing it ... engine would've gone out next anyway, sometime after the 2k hour mark.

Generac itself isn't real helpful with anything, unless they are dealing directly with the ASD technician. Even then, they are asking for installation pictures, dealer service info out of the unit's controller (logs of runtimes, scheduled maintenance, etc.) and the unit's ASD history. If you played by the authorized service dealer rules, this will get you warrantied parts. If a single I or T is not dotted or crossed (by an ASD), you'll be denied warranty service, and the unit becomes a paperweight. Generac doesn't care about you after a sale, as only their ASD's can plead a case. They only need a hair out of place to cancel their involvement in any support scenario.

OP may indicate improper continuous operations without maintenance, and it is real hard to find the exact wording that says how these should be operated in multi-day outages, but Generac has the lawyers & wording, plus a layer of ASD's, to get out from underneath anything.

I found that I could pay $5k for a 2,000 hour (generac-like standby generator, with ASD baggage and critical info locked away), or $1k for a 2,000 hour open-frame genny (that I can support myself). I keep two $1k gennies on hand, and alternate between them. Every few years, I part one out to keep the others running, and feed a new one in. My generators are now highly available, they're recycled for parts when necessary, and the whole system just works.

Never looked back to anything with an ASD network again or high initial costs.

Hope this helps ...

PS: my rules for incoming gens
1. dual-fuel, but run only on propane (from 500-gal site tanks)
2. open-frame, easy to work on, electric-start
3. inexpensive, $1k or thereabouts
4. minimum 3-year warranty, no ASD network, info not locked away
5. THD found to "not matter" (at my site, approaching a decade now)

PSS: I'm playing with units that have automatic chokes, remote-start fob's, and such, building up some knowledge/experience. While still open-frame and inexpensive, these might replace the current push-button start models I use. May be able to integrate these into the inverter after all.
 

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Also, to support Tabora's suggested autopsy route, OP just needs to feed the Generac S/N to the "other" power equipment forum, along with the details of the incident, and ask for the "autopsy".

The Generac ASD that runs the forum can get at the service history, and all the Generac ASD's that frequent those forums can pick apart what happened.

 
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