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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought a used GE 8K generator. And I have a few questions.
1. Is it difficult to change from propane to natural gas?
2. Can I run a manual switch with a automatic start gen?
3. If so can I just get a second manual breaker box and gang them together?
4. The reason for getting a natural gas gen is because my existing gen is 30 years old and runs on gasoline and we are installing a new heating system that is a heat pump with heating coils for backup heat. And my generator isn't wired for 220 volts.
Any advice is appreciated
Thanks in advance
 

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Up front, I'm not going to be much help other than to bump your post to the top. I stumbled across your post quite a ways down. At the very least you should be able to get a conversion kit from a company like US carb. Home - Motorsnorkel by US Carburetion But there are some pretty smart folks here. They may have a better solution. As for the switches, they will also have much better answers than me.

I usually come here with the questions and these guys always have the answers:LOL:
 

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I just bought a used GE 8K generator. And I have a few questions.
1. Is it difficult to change from propane to natural gas?
2. Can I run a manual switch with a automatic start gen?
3. If so can I just get a second manual breaker box and gang them together?
4. The reason for getting a natural gas gen is because my existing gen is 30 years old and runs on gasoline and we are installing a new heating system that is a heat pump with heating coils for backup heat. And my generator isn't wired for 220 volts.
Any advice is appreciated
Thanks in advance
what is the exact model numbers on the gen set?

and were you trying to state that the generator inlet to the house was not 240 vac. or the generator was a 120 vac only generator?

i run on NG here as well as dr and a few others.
and yes the systems from us carbs work well.

i like the mb sturgis quick disconnects and caps for the hoses and couplers.
softer blue silicone works well!
and they clean up well with green can brake clean.

make sure to get the proper hoses made for LP/ NG...
i need to get the hose numbers off the hoses i like asap.

NG is way way cheaper to run as a primary fuel.....
and make sure to go a system that is tri fuel so you have choices for fuels when things go bad in the world...
that way you can have a plan B and C for generator fuel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for your reply.
I was saying my old winco gasoline generator is wired with a 30 amp twist lock wire run underground to the house with a manual switch panel.
The one I just purchased i belive puts out 220 volts.
I was wondering if I could just get an additional manual switch panel and gang them together?
The reason is, I'm installing a new heating system which is a heat pump and the auxiliary heat is electric 220 volt. So the new generator will be needed to run that. And the fact that it will run on NG and has auto start is a bonus..
 

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Your current 30A 110V wiring only has 3 conductors (hot, neutral, ground).
The 220V/110V will need 4 conductors (2 hots, 1 neutral and one ground).

The buried wiring will need to be replaced or at least add another conductor in your buried run. If the amps are increased, the existing wiring may not be large enough and it will all need to be replaced anyway.

You'll also need a 220v transfer switch either manual or automatic. If your new gen has remote start/stop capability, connecting it to an automatic transfer switch would be ideal. Won't even have to get off the couch when power drops out.

If you want to stick with a manual transfer switch, that could be done. You could even mount a generator control switch near the manual transfer switch assuming it's a 2-wire start/stop set-up on the gen.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Your current 30A 110V wiring only has 3 conductors (hot, neutral, ground).
The 220V/110V will need 4 conductors (2 hots, 1 neutral and one ground).

The buried wiring will need to be replaced or at least add another conductor in your buried run. If the amps are increased, the existing wiring may not be large enough and it will all need to be replaced anyway.

You'll also need a 220v transfer switch either manual or automatic. If your new gen has remote start/stop capability, connecting it to an automatic transfer switch would be ideal. Won't even have to get off the couch when power drops out.

If you want to stick with a manual transfer switch, that could be done. You could even mount a generator control switch near the manual transfer switch assuming it's a 2-wire start/stop set-up on the gen.
I am not using the same location. The gasoline gen is in the back garage and is a portable unit.
The new to me GE unit will be mounted next to the house stationery and will run on natural gas.
So I will need a new transfer switch for 220 volt.
I now have a 6 circuit manual switch wich I will disconnect and will look to purchase a 10 circuit panel hopefully I can pull 2, 220 volt circuit 1 for the heat pump and 1, for the supplemental heating coil for when the temperature outside goes below 20°.
 

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So… that model number doesn’t seem to be searchable. Post a picture of the units info plate.

The only thing I come up with is what appears to be an old version of a rebranded Briggs& Stratton standby unit. It’s already configured for propane/natural gas without the need for a conversion. You should be searching for the proper accompanying transfer switch. Most likely sold as a Briggs and Stratton.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Is this A standby generator or portable?
Standby, permanently mounted and will run on natural gas
So… that model number doesn’t seem to be searchable. Post a picture of the units info plate.

The only thing I come up with is what appears to be an old version of a rebranded Briggs& Stratton standby unit. It’s already configured for propane/natural gas without the need for a conversion. You should be searching for the proper accompanying transfer switch. Most likely sold as a Briggs and Stratton.
Ok will do it is still on my trailer wrapped up. I need to move it and unwrap it first.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
So… that model number doesn’t seem to be searchable. Post a picture of the units info plate.

The only thing I come up with is what appears to be an old version of a rebranded Briggs& Stratton standby unit. It’s already configured for propane/natural gas without the need for a conversion. You should be searching for the proper accompanying transfer switch. Most likely sold as a Briggs and Stratton.
Here are some pictures
Computer Office equipment Automotive design Computer hardware Audio equipment

Rectangle Font Plant Tints and shades Tree

Computer hardware Gas Technology Machine Electronic device
 

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I feel like you are stuck contacting GE or Briggs and strattons customer service for an appropriate configured transfer switch for that generator. That’s the only way to be certain that the transfer switch will operate automatically start the generator and transfer power.

The other option is to use the generator as a manually started permanently installed fixture. The home connection can be a transfer panel or a simple interlock kit.
 
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