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Discussion Starter #21
Isn't the water heater a 240VAC device?

Link please to the furnace THD requirement?

Note that THD is ALMOST ALWAYS a marketing number with ZERO effect on devices. In fact, the non-sinusoidal UPS step wave is better suited for virtually all electronics when compared to a sine wave output.
No - my water heater is gas fired. However, it has a forced exhaust, and the blower and control electronic plug into a standard 110v outlet mounted above the water heater.

As for my furnace, it was in a document I got from Lennox (attached). I just went back and re-read it, and I guess I could technically go as high as 8% - but I was driving for 5% or less per the document.

Again, thanks for all the help, but I've really ruled out selling the generator and buying another one. Now all I want to do is connect it, safely. Sounds like the multicircuit switch (or individual switches) are the way to go.

Thanks,
LP
 

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The manual and the online documentation for my Troy-Bilt 030245 generator do not define the THD.

A chat interaction with them and w/ Briggs and Stratton (the manufacturer who makes this generator under contract to Troy-Bilt) revealed a verbal THD of 3-6% specification, but no written documentation of that parameter.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
The manual and the online documentation for my Troy-Bilt 030245 generator do not define the THD.

A chat interaction with them and w/ Briggs and Stratton (the manufacturer who makes this generator under contract to Troy-Bilt) revealed a verbal THD of 3-6% specification, but no written documentation of that parameter.
Yeah - that's kinda what I found with most conventional generators. They don't seem to document THD very often. From the reading I've done, it's generally assumed that they run between 5 and 20%, so I have no idea how bad/good they really are. In my case, I wanted to be sure I had a number since I still have several years left on my furnace warranty.

LP
 

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Wait - you think going with a multicircuit switch is a bad idea now?
I just think you're spending an awful lot to have an electrician hook up the larger transfer switch for such a small generator/coverage. Your Wen is rated 3400W continuous, which is 28.3A total. That Briggs (as an example) is rated 5000W continuous, but at 240V. That's 41.7A of 120V, which means you could put in a simple transfer switch in your garage in between the current main switch and the main panel (see link below, also an easy install) and feed the entire main panel, controlling the loads with the breakers in the main panel as I do with my GenerLink. Also, a bigger generator means you're operating farther down into the sweet spot of the load range, with more startup reserve and the ability to add additional circuits (or swap what's being driven) at will.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/GE-200-Amp-240-Volt-Non-Fused-Emergency-Power-Transfer-Switch-TC10324R/100150463

Or, since you've already predetermined the few circuits you want to cover and don't plan to go to a 240V generator, you can do it yourself and save a bunch with a 6 circuit 120V transfer unit as previously discussed if you don't want to go the EZ Transfer Switch route. Cheap & easy.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
I just think you're spending an awful lot to have an electrician hook up the larger transfer switch for such a small generator/coverage. Your Wen is rated 3400W continuous, which is 28.3A total. That Briggs (as an example) is rated 5000W continuous, but at 240V. That's 41.7A of 120V, which means you could put in a simple transfer switch in your garage in between the current main switch and the main panel (see link below, also an easy install) and feed the entire main panel, controlling the loads with the breakers in the main panel as I do with my GenerLink. Also, a bigger generator means you're operating farther down into the sweet spot of the load range, with more startup reserve and the ability to add additional circuits (or swap what's being driven) at will.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/GE-200-Amp-240-Volt-Non-Fused-Emergency-Power-Transfer-Switch-TC10324R/100150463

Or, since you've already predetermined the few circuits you want to cover and don't plan to go to a 240V generator, you can do it yourself and save a bunch with a 6 circuit 120V transfer unit as previously discussed if you don't want to go the EZ Transfer Switch route. Cheap & easy.
Got it - thanks Tabora. That helps. I still think I'm going to keep my WEN for now, but I'll give some additional thought to the size of the switch. I was thinking bigger in case I wanted to upgrade the generator later - but you're right, if I did that, a whole house switch and 240v generator would be the way to go. In reference to that Briggs unit, I saw a few complaints about it not being able to handle the rated power which bothered me as well.

Thanks again for the help and patience!

LP
 

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yea thd is mostly for the speed conventional gen sets..
it has to do with the hz and voltage..
so here is the kicker.
most good inverter gen units this is not an issue as they use 3 phase feeding the gens inverter...
so unless you have large induction motors like on well pumps or sump pumps....
the sag on the line voltage is not an issue...
testing is a good thing!!
get an good clamp current meter... or rent one or borrow one!!
I found my sperry units on ebay!!
pm me for model numbers etc.
you can watch the current when the device in question kicks in for in rush
I use an ups for the electronics on the furnace only...
that way it is not an issue!!
it will buck boost the power to pure...
another thing to look at is if the furnace has a dc power supply in it!!
some do!!
and some do not have computer grade filtering!!
that can be added!!
any good electronics tech can help with that!!
and the cool thing is the cost is not much!! that is on dc!! not the ac side!!

on my furnace the motor kicks in for a in rush on the fan at 5 amps.. and run is at 1 amp...
how I cured this was to lock the fan to run during a power outage!
then it is only an issue once!! when you kick in the fan!!
a real kiss thing!! (keep it simple stupid or KISS) grin!!

induction motors kill the thd rating...
and for the ac compressor units a MICRO AIR SOFT START works!!
I have a link on this page honda eu 2200i generator accy pages
my idea is these may work on the furnace fan motors as well!!
stop the in rush of the 90 amps or more on a fan!!

kinda surprised that the furnace mfg's have not made these an option or oem on expensive furnace units!!
yea they cost money...
but!!
you can run a smaller gen set!!
they work for the state fair camper bunch!!
most of the camper ac units need a 3 kw genset to start one ac unit!!
you can do it with a single honda 2000i if you use one of the MICRO AIR SOFT START units..
saves the extra gen cost now, and saves fuel in the long run!!

I guess for me it is all about the big picture!!
I like comforts!!
so lights, internet, tv, heat/ cooling and cooking is a must..
and if I can get by for low cost and low noise then I am all about that!!
GRIN!!

oh yea that brings up a BIG thing with me!!
NOISE!!
the Honda units are quiet!! 50 db or less on audio noise as they are.
and you can build a quiet box for camp grounds or do a special gen shack for home use.
during a BIG power event the noise is bad!!

last ice event we had here you could hear the LOUD classic briggs units running and popping...
it was bad!!
I had a neighbor walk over and asked how I had power..
he did not even hear the 2000i purring!!
I had not even put the cover on yet!! but it was on the foam mat.

the better honda 7000is or handy 3000i units are quiet as well!!
they have factory wheels...
and there are aftermarket extended run and tri fuel kits out there for them..

oh yea there is an optional remote start now for the 7000is now!!
pretty cool if you have an auto switch!!
and still cool if you are doing off grid to charge battery's... start and stop the gen from remote!!
 

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hummm
why not think outside the box??
use a plain old transfer switch or panel conversion for main lock out.
run the hd 250 vac wiring out to the gen inlet
I ran 6/4 gauge so it could be converter to a rv outlet if needed easy.
on your custom feed cord plug that is a 240 single phase plug from your generator
jumper the L1 and L2 in the dedicated cord for this use.
note do not make a widow maker cord!!
those are double male cords!
but a proper male female generator inlet cord!
kinda like the ones they use for rv use on a 15p connection.
a basic dog bone maybe!!

yea just trip out any 240 breakers in the main panel when you are on generator.
unless you have a 240 volt well pump or sump pump...
then you need a larger 240 volt generator that will handle the loads...

I would make sure what ever setup you decide on custom or store bought
that you have both volt meters and current meters separate for L1 and L2!!
you can see my custom generator setup at https://hondagenerator.groups.io
and yes I am running 120 vac!
I like the low fuel consumption!!
 

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Discussion Starter #30
hummm
why not think outside the box??
use a plain old transfer switch or panel conversion for main lock out.
run the hd 250 vac wiring out to the gen inlet
I ran 6/4 gauge so it could be converter to a rv outlet if needed easy.
on your custom feed cord plug that is a 240 single phase plug from your generator
jumper the L1 and L2 in the dedicated cord for this use.
note do not make a widow maker cord!!
those are double male cords!
but a proper male female generator inlet cord!
kinda like the ones they use for rv use on a 15p connection.
a basic dog bone maybe!!

yea just trip out any 240 breakers in the main panel when you are on generator.
unless you have a 240 volt well pump or sump pump...
then you need a larger 240 volt generator that will handle the loads...

I would make sure what ever setup you decide on custom or store bought
that you have both volt meters and current meters separate for L1 and L2!!
you can see my custom generator setup at https://hondagenerator.groups.io
and yes I am running 120 vac!
I like the low fuel consumption!!
I'll admit to not being able to follow a lot of your posts, but if I'm reading this correctly, this is what I originally proposed. The folks here convinced me it was a bad idea.

FWIW, my main breaker is in the garage at the service entry on the first floor, and my main load panel is in the basement on the other side of the garage. It would be a PAIN IN THE A$$ to run new power cables given the route the builders used. So I'm done waffling....electrician coming mid-Feb and installing a standard multicircuit transfer switch in the basement.

LP
 
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