Power Equipment Forum banner
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi all, I'm having an interlock installed soon and looking for a power inlet that is flush mounted to drywall. Our panel is flush mounted indoors and it would be nice to match. I've considered going with a manual transfer switch to accomplish this but I'd rather not be forced to select circuits ahead of time.

It will currently be used with a Honda EU2200i (modified for tri-fuel) or inverter with LiFePO4 or car battery. I'm planning on a 30A inlet with an adapter for the 15A sources. Not for powering the whole house of course, just the critical loads.

Is an outdoor power inlet up to code used indoors?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·

·
Registered
Joined
·
547 Posts
Curious, why do you want a power inlet for a generator which, by design, is weather proof and designed to be mounted outdoors, inside? The generator is going to be OUTSIDE? Even if it's in a finished garage, it should be outside. Running the power cord through a window? Saving the cost of penetrating a exterior wall? Also, those twist lock connectors require a bit of force to connect and disconnect so it needs to be securely mounted, not just on drywall.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Curious, why do you want a power inlet for a generator which, by design, is weather proof and designed to be mounted outdoors, inside? The generator is going to be OUTSIDE? Even if it's in a finished garage, it should be outside.
The generator runs outside in front of garage. The electric service panel is inside the garage. The inlet could be on the outside but I will use it with an inverter/battery setup also so I'd rather not have it outside. It would be just on the other side of the panel anyway if it was put on the outside wall.

Running the power cord through a window? Saving the cost of penetrating a exterior wall?
The generator power cord runs inside under the garage door or in a small opening at the bottom of the garage door side.

Also, those twist lock connectors require a bit of force to connect and disconnect so it needs to be securely mounted, not just on drywall.
Sorry, I didn't mean to indicate it would mount only on drywall. Ideally it would mount like a flush manual transfer switch. Like this which is something I'm considering.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
547 Posts
All is good. The transfer switch you've selected is a good choice as you only have 120V and would have to isolate the critical circuits you want to power. An inverter fed by a car battery (unless the car was outside idling) won't last very long compared to the 1800W steady state the Honda will provide. 1800W isn't a lot for critical loads in a house, particularly if there's a frig involved.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
All is good. The transfer switch you've selected is a good choice as you only have 120V and would have to isolate the critical circuits you want to power.
It would be a nice clean install, but I don't really want the transfer switch. I want the flush-mounted power inlet to use with an interlock and circuit breaker.

An inverter fed by a car battery (unless the car was outside idling) won't last very long compared to the 1800W steady state the Honda will provide.
The car would be idling in this scenario. It's only for use if generator and inverter/LiFePO4 are not available. Using car as generator works really nice with a hybrid vehicle, especially the newer Toyota Highlander with built-in 1500W inverter tied to main battery, not 12v.

1800W isn't a lot for critical loads in a house, particularly if there's a frig involved.
Our fridge is easy to handle with the generator or inverter/battery. It has a startup ~1100w and then only uses ~140w when intermittently running.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
547 Posts
The interlock and 2P breaker is the cheapest and easiest way to go. As you only have 120V you'll have to be "creative" in wiring the plug to 1.) Get the 120V to both sides of your load center or 2.) Just have the 120V on one side and swap critical loads around so they're on that side. I got "creative" as I have one generator that is only 120V and just made a much simpler install. Also, down the road you might want to get a bigger generator with 120/240V, which actually happened to me as I was at Lowe's and they were selling some at 55% off. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The interlock and 2P breaker is the cheapest and easiest way to go. As you only have 120V you'll have to be "creative" in wiring the plug to 1.) Get the 120V to both sides of your load center or 2.) Just have the 120V on one side and swap critical loads around so they're on that side. I got "creative" as I have one generator that is only 120V and just made a much simpler install.
As luck would have it, the circuits I really need are on the right bus bar. There are 2 on the left that I'd like to add if possible, though the jury is still out on being able to start one of the furnaces. And the microwave is optional.

8895


This is still new to me, so with the interlock 2P breaker it won't span both bus bars for 120v each?

Also, down the road you might want to get a bigger generator with 120/240V, which actually happened to me as I was at Lowe's and they were selling some at 55% off. :)
In the "2 is 1, 1 is none" idea, I'm more likely to add a companion EU2200i than buy a larger generator.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
547 Posts
Each side of the 2P breaker will feed one side. That would normally be two 120V feeds or 240V between them. You only have 120V, not 120/240V. What I did is take two 120V plugs, wired into a 120/240V plug to feed both sides. It's simple to accomplish, but not to describe in writing, talk to an electrician. Make sure you tell them that your expansion plans are for an additional 120V unit which would work well with the "two into one" described above. You do realize that adding an additional 120V unit will not provide 240V for AC's, etc. There are other ways to accomplish this, e.g. just jumper the generator side of the 2P breaker together, but, again, talk to an electrician.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
The right adapter/cord will get power to both sides of the panel. I have an L14-30 inlet on the back of my house wired into my panel. Look for a cord that has "Two hots bridged". Here are examples depending on what plug is on your generator.
TT-30P to L14-30R and this is a cool one (2)5-15 Plug to Generator L14-30
Someone correct me if I'm wrong but this should power both sides of a L14-30 power cord and carry 120 to both sides of your panel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Each side of the 2P breaker will feed one side. That would normally be two 120V feeds or 240V between them. You only have 120V, not 120/240V. What I did is take two 120V plugs, wired into a 120/240V plug to feed both sides. It's simple to accomplish, but not to describe in writing, talk to an electrician. Make sure you tell them that your expansion plans are for an additional 120V unit which would work well with the "two into one" described above. You do realize that adding an additional 120V unit will not provide 240V for AC's, etc. There are other ways to accomplish this, e.g. just jumper the generator side of the 2P breaker together, but, again, talk to an electrician.
It sounds like the transfer switch is simpler considering this issue, or moving the 2 left leg breakers to the right side. The first furnace breaker will have to be moved regardless for the interlock breaker.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The right adapter/cord will get power to both sides of the panel. I have an L14-30 inlet on the back of my house wired into my panel. Look for a cord that has "Two hots bridged". Here are examples depending on what plug is on your generator.
TT-30P to L14-30R and this is a cool one (2)5-15 Plug to Generator L14-30
Someone correct me if I'm wrong but this should power both sides of a L14-30 power cord and carry 120 to both sides of your panel.
That second cable is interesting. I was thinking that 2 power inlets could be used for each generator receptacle outlet, but that is a nice option.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
547 Posts
Yes, the "Cool one" mentioned above will work. Additional point, you may have to separate the ground and neutral on the generator to meet code, I'm not familiar with Hondas. How those are arranged on your "built in" vehicle inverter I have no idea.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
547 Posts
Your comment about the "built in" vehicle inverter made me curious so I looked into it a little. What the attached link "seems" to indicate is that this is for limited use inside the vehicle or via an extension cord to power self contained external loads. I'm not sure that using it in place of a generator and trying to power your house would work. Thinking about introducing it to external ground and neutral connections when it was designed to be self contained. Perhaps if you power an inverter which provides adequate isolation that could power your house.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Additional point, you may have to separate the ground and neutral on the generator to meet code, I'm not familiar with Hondas.
The Honda has a floating neutral.

How those are arranged on your "built in" vehicle inverter I have no idea.
Sorry, I was just mentioning the new Highlander with built-in inverter is pretty cool, I don't have one. There is a thread here on people using it. The new Ford F150 hybrid is even better, it has an option for a 7500w inverter generator.

I have a Giandel 1200w inverter and some portable power stations that are inverter/charger/battery combos.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Your comment about the "built in" vehicle inverter made me curious so I looked into it a little. What the attached link "seems" to indicate is that this is for limited use inside the vehicle or via an extension cord to power self contained external loads. I'm not sure that using it in place of a generator and trying to power your house would work. Thinking about introducing it to external ground and neutral connections when it was designed to be self contained. Perhaps if you power an inverter which provides adequate isolation that could power your house.
That may be Toyota's intention, but people have gone beyond that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
As luck would have it, the circuits I really need are on the right bus bar. There are 2 on the left that I'd like to add if possible, though the jury is still out on being able to start one of the furnaces. And the microwave is optional.
Power User, I'm confused about your comment here about the "right bus bar". Your picture circles a group of circuits on the right side of the panel. Is that what you mean? I believe the bus bars are indicated by the "A" or "B" next to the circuit number on the panel label, not by presence of the breaker on the right or left side. The bus bars actually interleave underneath the breakers so that both A and B are available on both the right and left sides; this allows a 240V breaker to be installed on one side. (Look at your AC and Dryer circuits; they wouldn't work otherwise). Later you say "... with the interlock 2P breaker it won't span both bus bars for 120v each? ". If you are pushing the same 120V input to both the A and B bus bars, I believe you are right. In other words, if you are using a single 120V source to power both bus bars, 120 would be available at all circuit positions. No need to move anything. But remember your 240V circuits will not work. (I think those breakers should be turned off when you operate this way with the generator.) I'm not and electrician; I'd be interested to see if your electrician thinks this is all up to code.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top