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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello:
Never had a generator before. Bought this so that my 2 fridges and freezer full of food would be safe
in power outages.
Plan to run it on NG.

Couple questions please:
Can't seem to find any Generator extension cords that are 20 - 30 amp at 100 feet.
Can I just use the one that came with it (2 feet with 4 regular plugs on the end) and attach
3 extension cords to it ?
Also, other than having to keep an eye on the oil, since NG doesn't run out can I just keep it going for
50 hours at a time ?
Thanks for reading.
Sammy
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I appreciate that. I was thinking about a generlink as the easiest way to power the whole house, but have decided for now to just use some extension cords. I figured there would be someone on here that used them and wondered what they do.
 

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To answer your question you could run three extension cords from the two foot cord supplied, you'd have to compare costs of those vs the one suggested above. Better to use the single large one and plug your "splitter" in at the end and go from there. We got along with extension cords for years before I installed an interlock, not convenient, but worked. If you decide on three, I'd use at least 12 ga. wire as voltage drop could be very detrimental to the appliances you mention. Here's a link I grabbed at random.

 

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As others have mentioned, get a 100' standard 10 AWG 240V generator cord (can use with an interlock later) and put a 120V splitter at the end in the house to breakout to your appliances:

 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank You for all for your input. The generator is in the back yard and I can get the cord(s) in at the side of my house
thorough a vent made for something that was never put in, that's why the length of cord. Glad to read "you got along with cords for years", that's exactly what I was looking for, now I will feel confident in using the cord(s). After all replies I will get a 100 foot 10 gauge and put a power bar at the end. FYI this generator is really for our next house (more rural), but as it happens the town I live in sucks for power outages so I can maybe get some experience powering our essentials here. Thanks again.
 

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yup a gen set is handy to have for any where!
you never know when or where you might need power next...

just do not loan out your main back up gen set to any one...
 

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Also, other than having to keep an eye on the oil, since NG doesn't run out can I just keep it going for
50 hours at a time ?
Thanks for reading.
Sammy
Forgot to touch on this, If long run times are on the agenda oil level and adequate cooling are the top two concerns. If it’s a summer outage make sure it isn’t tucked into a corner and there is plenty of airflow around the unit. Shade goes a long way as well. The generator has a low oil shutoff but you don’t want to reach that point.

Oil consumption is worse on generators that were not broken in properly. From new, start with conventional oil, blend is okay if conventional isn’t availible. I keep it simple, 7 hours at 70% load. Change the oil with blend or synthetic from then on. The idea is to use the cylinders cross hatching to properly file the piston rings into perfect contact with the cylinder right off the bat. Too little load at the beginning wears the cross hatches smooth before the rings can seat properly. This creates blow by and adds to oil consumption.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Also, the Firman oil that came with it isn't enough to fill the tank.....odd. I can't find anywhere in Canada that carries Firman oil. Probably doesn't matter to use any other brand does it ?
 

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Any 10W-30 conventional motor oil will be fine for your break in. Just vary the loads over a few hours and you should be fine. Replace with a good synthetic oil after the break in is done and you're good to go. Maybe get a magnetic dipstick to help catch some of the metal grit and shavings.
 

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Can you tell me exactly how to break it in. It doesn't say in manual ?
Break-in is done with the unit new, the idea is to load it up and put it to work. Generators spend most of their time lightly loaded, and their big engines are sized for maximum amperage which they rarely see. This is the problem. They are practically idling most of the time.

I like 70% of rated load, that’s 5600watts for yours. Anything around 5000 will be fine. You simply don’t want the engine to be lightly loaded for the first few hours.

Pick a day, grab some resistive loads like space heaters or hair dryers and let the generator do its thing. I have 4 hairdryers that I use for load tests and break in on fresh engines. To my surprise hair I’ve had these hairdryers hooked up for hours straight and they stayed running without issue.

You can use a kill-a-watt meter or line splitter and clamp meter to calculate how many watts you are drawing.

Once you’ve accumulated enough hours, change the oil and you’re good to go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Break-in is done with the unit new, the idea is to load it up and put it to work. Generators spend most of their time lightly loaded, and their big engines are sized for maximum amperage which they rarely see. This is the problem. They are practically idling most of the time.

I like 70% of rated load, that’s 5600watts for yours. Anything around 5000 will be fine. You simply don’t want the engine to be lightly loaded for the first few hours.

Pick a day, grab some resistive loads like space heaters or hair dryers and let the generator do its thing. I have 4 hairdryers that I use for load tests and break in on fresh engines. To my surprise hair I’ve had these hairdryers hooked up for hours straight and they stayed running without issue.

You can use a kill-a-watt meter or line splitter and clamp meter to calculate how many watts you are drawing.

Once you’ve accumulated enough hours, change the oil and you’re good to go.
Okay, thank you. That's just what I'll do.
 

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Okay, thank you. That's just what I'll do.
I‘m sorry, but running a new engine at a constant load for several hours is most definitely not the proper way to break it in. I posted this generic break-in procedure a while back in another thread.

”……a typical IC engine requires 2 to 6 hours to break-in. The biggest things to remember when breaking in an engine are to vary the load and speed (speed is hard to do on a generator that’s not an inverter and/or not equipped with eco mode!!!) and avoid sustained high loads during the first few hours of operation. This is how I would break-in a Honda EU engine.....
0 - .5 hours: Do not use eco mode. Randomly vary the load between no-load and 25% of rated continuous load.
.5 - 1 hour: Randomly turn eco mode on and off to vary engine speed. Randomly vary the load between no-load and 50% of rated continuous load. Only run at 50% load for no more than 30 seconds at a time.
1 - 1.5 hours: Randomly turn eco mode on and off. Randomly vary the load between no-load and 75% of rated continuous load. Only run at 75% load for no more than 30 - 60 seconds at a time.
1.5 - 2 hours: (or up to 6 hours if it makes you feel more comfortable!) Randomly turn eco mode on and off to vary engine speed. Randomly vary the load between no-load and rated continuous load. Only run at rated continuous load for no more than 30 - 60 seconds at a time.
After breaking in.......run it like you stole it!
😜”

Hope this helps!
 

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I‘m sorry, but running a new engine at a constant load for several hours is most definitely not the proper way to break it in. I posted this generic break-in procedure a while back in another thread.

”……a typical IC engine requires 2 to 6 hours to break-in. The biggest things to remember when breaking in an engine are to vary the load and speed (speed is hard to do on a generator that’s not an inverter and/or not equipped with eco mode!!!) and avoid sustained high loads during the first few hours of operation. This is how I would break-in a Honda EU engine.....
0 - .5 hours: Do not use eco mode. Randomly vary the load between no-load and 25% of rated continuous load.
.5 - 1 hour: Randomly turn eco mode on and off to vary engine speed. Randomly vary the load between no-load and 50% of rated continuous load. Only run at 50% load for no more than 30 seconds at a time.
1 - 1.5 hours: Randomly turn eco mode on and off. Randomly vary the load between no-load and 75% of rated continuous load. Only run at 75% load for no more than 30 - 60 seconds at a time.
1.5 - 2 hours: (or up to 6 hours if it makes you feel more comfortable!) Randomly turn eco mode on and off to vary engine speed. Randomly vary the load between no-load and rated continuous load. Only run at rated continuous load for no more than 30 - 60 seconds at a time.
After breaking in.......run it like you stole it!
😜”

Hope this helps!
On a piece of power equipment THIS much attention to detail is superfluous.

The focus is to apply enough load to have adequate cylinder pressures for ring to cylinder honing before the cylinders cross hatching looses its ridges.

No harm in varying load, just keep it appropriate.
 

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On a piece of power equipment THIS much attention to detail is superfluous.

The focus is to apply enough load to have adequate cylinder pressures for ring to cylinder honing before the cylinders cross hatching looses its ridges.

No harm is varying load, just keep it appropriate.
I guess we’ll agree to disagree! I’ll use my 25 years of experience in the engine development and testing field and you can use whatever experience you have. No harm, no foul!
 

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I guess we’ll agree to disagree! I’ll use my 25 years of experience in the engine development and testing field and you can use whatever experience you have. No harm, no foul!
Deal 😉. I never meant to overly simplify engine break in. Just highlight a common issue with new generator ownership, and the basic principle of break in.
 
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