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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Brand new EU7000is that has been started up a few times and worked perfectly
Tried to start it today - turned key, pressed start button. Made a little starter noise and then went dead.

By dead I mean no LEDs lit up... nothing, zip.
So okay I thought the battery was dead. I'm in Alaska and it's currently -20 so things don't work so great.
Took battery inside to warm and charge.
It was not dead and charged to fully pretty quickly.

Re-connected the battery and still it's dead stick. LIke I said, not a single LED lights up just DEAD

And that's where I'm at.

?
 

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Looking at the manual (p. 63), check the fuses (15A and 3A) if any of them are blown.

Try using the recoil to see if the engine is free to rotate. I'm guessing that the extremely cold weather may have caused the engine to seize and made the starter pull a lot of current.
 

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also what weight of oil are you using up there?
we use 0-20 oil in the cold weather on the eu7000is gens.
i bet the battery is frozen.
it need to warm up for at least 2 days or place it in a warm water bath below the top by 1/2 and inch till the case is at least 70 deg f.
then charge the battery.
a battery blanket is a great idea for below 10 deg F
 

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Yep, battery is toast. Have it load tested or replaced and Keep it on a maintainer if possible. Run the generator every month for 30 minutes with a load on it, or other problems will arise…
 

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Brand new EU7000is that has been started up a few times and worked perfectly
Tried to start it today - turned key, pressed start button. Made a little starter noise and then went dead.

By dead I mean no LEDs lit up... nothing, zip.
So okay I thought the battery was dead. I'm in Alaska and it's currently -20 so things don't work so great.
Took battery inside to warm and charge.
It was not dead and charged to fully pretty quickly.

Re-connected the battery and still it's dead stick. LIke I said, not a single LED lights up just DEAD

And that's where I'm at.

?
Are there any codes on the I-monitor? I just posted in a thread where there was a batt code and unit would not run at all. I ended up replacing the GCU but hopefully this is not the case. Most units don't like the cold so like the other guys said. Keep the battery inside to let it warm up. My advice is to try and keep the generator in the warm if that's an option for you.
 

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I hope you're not storing the generator in -20 degree weather. That would not be good for the battery or the oil. Internal wiring, imperfect solder joints and crimp connectors can also be affected by severe cold, though this is very uncommon. You can try hooking up a good 12V car battery to see if it will run using the electric start. Pull starting should also work. Highly recommend using a battery tender when not in use and thinner winter weight oil for your climate.
 

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Brand new EU7000is that has been started up a few times and worked perfectly
Tried to start it today - turned key, pressed start button. Made a little starter noise and then went dead.

By dead I mean no LEDs lit up... nothing, zip.
So okay I thought the battery was dead. I'm in Alaska and it's currently -20 so things don't work so great.
Took battery inside to warm and charge.
It was not dead and charged to fully pretty quickly.

Re-connected the battery and still it's dead stick. LIke I said, not a single LED lights up just DEAD

And that's where I'm at.

?
Another option is to open the right side door (facing the unit) turn the key to on and attempt pull starting the unit. see what happens.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Looking at the manual (p. 63), check the fuses (15A and 3A) if any of them are blown.

Try using the recoil to see if the engine is free to rotate. I'm guessing that the extremely cold weather may have caused the engine to seize and made the starter pull a lot of current.
Yup
Blown fuse
Will try to start via recoil but first going to warm it up a bit

battery is fine, never lost charge so didn’t freeze

battery won’t freeze as long as it has charge
Agree that I need to get a battery tender on there

thanks
 

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Happy that you found what the issue was. Hopefully the blown fuse was just an anomaly and doesn’t happen again. Might be wise to have a spare. I use Amsoil Synthetic Small Engine Oil in my Honda engines, the 10w30, which is the preferred weight for Honda engines. But I’d suggest the 5w30 which has a pour point of -45C, due to your climate, if you can find it. Or order it online. pm for a link.
Bottle Liquid Automotive tire Fluid Gas
 

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Good question
I’ve tried to start engines that were super cold before
Starter might labor mightily but never blew a fuse

hopefully once I get it warmed a bitI can start with recoil


It was the 15 amp.
The 15amp fuse is the master fuse, it feeds power through the 3amp which powers GCU Logic. It also appears to have a direct feed to the GCU as the power source for triggering the starter solenoid. The starter itself is high current is powered by the battery but the starter solenoid doesn’t require much current to activate.

Its unusual to hear of one of the fuses blowing to excess current, but extreme cold can be at fault and is an easy place to place the blame.

Lower viscosity oil definitely would be applicable for -20 degrees and would put less strain on the starting system. If a thinner oil doesn't remedy reoccurrences potentially there may be an intermittent short to ground (unlikely). Or a faulty starter (unlikely). A 20amp fuse in place of the 15amp (last resort) might be a reasonable work around. Assuming that this only occurs when temps are WAY below freezing.
 

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If adapting the generator for cold starting, I'd probably use a slow-blow 15A fuse instead of a standard 20A.
 

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If adapting the generator for cold starting, I'd probably use a slow-blow 15A fuse instead of a standard 20A.
👍 I also thought about that, but I’ve never actually seen such that small of a slow blow(time delay) ATO fuse.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
warmed up the gennie and it started on second pull easy peazy. So now I'm charging my battery bank

Am sure the fuse blow was cold related, Reading about -30 F. this morning. So in the future I'll have to warm it up when it's this cold.

I'm a long time user of Hondas but mostly EU1000 and 2000. This 7000 is a new thing for me so thanks for all the feedback and ideas guys!

Yeah we use 5-30 oil up here for pretty much everything
 

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Minus 30F must be an experience. I don't think I've ever experienced that low a temperature, though I did some high elevation skiing once on a day with high winds where the wind chill at the summit was said to be -47F. Not many people were out on the mountain that day. If you weren't fully covered with full face mask, you basically couldn't do it and your feet would freeze regardless. Kinda crazy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Minus 30F must be an experience. I don't think I've ever experienced that low a temperature, though I did some high elevation skiing once on a day with high winds where the wind chill at the summit was said to be -47F. Not many people were out on the mountain that day. If you weren't fully covered with full face mask, you basically couldn't do it and your feet would freeze regardless. Kinda crazy.
ha ha
Yeah it’s around -40 today so about as bad as it gets where I am. You really don’t even think about trying to start machines in this weather.

had to get the gennie going but turning over a truck engine? ***etaboutit

only go out the door to get an armload of firewood off the porch
 

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Once we hit zero or thereabouts (quite a few times per winter season) on down to about -20 (lowest I've ever seen), we also give up on working with equipment outside. The gennies are OK to about 10 degrees, then iffy below that to zero, and then impossible below zero.

One thing this has forced on us in our off-grid location is the concept of heated utility sheds or outbuildings ... it isn't enough to keep the rain out all seasons, we also have to heat the structure (propane heaters w/ thermostats) in the bitter winter months.

In the case of gennies, which need pretty good ventilation, the structure is in place (8' x 16' open-air shed w/ roof) for those, but I'm still working out the panels that let us leave things open in the spring/summer/fall (for maximum work area where we run long materials thru the shop half, powered by the genny half), and close things in the winter months. We need just enough coverings (6 x 8'x8' sections) such that a propane heater raises the inside temp to something above freezing ...

Leaning towards a dense mesh covering material, but not really decided yet ...

If I achieve this, then the boss may make me work outside all winter long ... double-edged sword ...
 
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