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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have Honda eu7ooois generator and I have a question about adjusting the intake and exhaust valves. I am at 300 hours and it states that the valves need to be checked for clearance. I have the service manual and it shows what to do and the specs but doesn't state which is the exhaust valve and which is the intake valve. My question is when I remove head cover and view the the two valves which is the exhaust valve and which is the intake valve? Is the valve on the right the intake valve. This is a fuel injected generator so wasn't sure which is which. Thank for any help.
 

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I have Honda eu7ooois generator and I have a question about adjusting the intake and exhaust valves. I am at 300 hours and it states that the valves need to be checked for clearance. I have the service manual and it shows what to do and the specs but doesn't state which is the exhaust valve and which is the intake valve. My question is when I remove head cover and view the the two valves which is the exhaust valve and which is the intake valve? Is the valve on the right the intake valve. This is a fuel injected generator so wasn't sure which is which. Thank for any help.
I have one that is over 5 years old, 1100 hours and I have never messed with those. Unless is giving you trouble, I would leave those valves alone. As long as you keep your oil changes on schedule and most important, good quality oil, you should not have any problems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you for the information. I did check the valves and the intake valve was a little tight so just changed it slightly to speck. The hardest part was trying to find the mark for TDC and getting it line as that motor has so much compression even with the spark plug out. Did eventually find TDC. Also changed the spark plug and cleaned the air filter and cleaned the spark arrestor. Everything was very clean as I do not run the generator in a dirty environment. Thanks
 

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as that motor has so much compression even with the spark plug out.
Actually, the compression should be zero with the plug out.
Did eventually find TDC.
Just put a pencil in the plug hole and pull it over until the pencil is at its maximum extension. That is TDC.
 
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Thank you for the information. I did check the valves and the intake valve was a little tight so just changed it slightly to speck. The hardest part was trying to find the mark for TDC and getting it line as that motor has so much compression even with the spark plug out. Did eventually find TDC. Also changed the spark plug and cleaned the air filter and cleaned the spark arrestor. Everything was very clean as I do not run the generator in a dirty environment. Thanks
it is the inverter via the stator holding the magnets...
if you unplug the generator stator it will spin free.

you might want to make a clean shack for the generator to run.
easy to build and run.
and makes them last for many years.
 

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Speaking of compression…
when I store my Honda EU3000 I strive to get the piston on the compression stroke. When I slowly pull the starter rope there is a point of resistance, then no resistance, then immediately resistance again. These two points of resistance are very close together (on the same pull stroke) with no resistance between them. So do you stop on the first or second point of resistance to leave the engine on it's compression stroke with the valves closed? Or does it even matter which one?
 

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colt
it depends if it is compression or if it is the inverter.
hard to tell the difference unless you are a service tech.
i bet you are at inverter stop.
at least with one or both.
I guess when I need to pull the spark plug I could measure where the piston is at those two points in relation to top/bottom. I had thought about pulling the plug anyway to put some anti-seize on the threads, since it’s been in there 10 years.
 

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I guess when I need to pull the spark plug I could measure where the piston is at those two points in relation to top/bottom. I had thought about pulling the plug anyway to put some anti-seize on the threads, since it’s been in there 10 years.
The piston travel distance will be the same on exhaust & compression strokes.

If you are using NGK plugs, NGK says this about using anti-seize:
NGK spark plugs feature trivalent plating. This silver or chrome-colored finish on the threads is designed to provide corrosion resistance against moisture and chemicals. The coating also acts as a release agent during spark plug removal. NGK spark plugs are installed at the factory dry, without lubrication or anti-seize.
Anti-seize can act as a lubricant, altering torque values up to 20 percent, increasing the risk of spark plug thread breakage and/or metal shell stretch. Thread breakage can sometimes involve removing the cylinder head for repair. Metal shell stretch changes the heat rating of the spark plug and can result in serious engine damage caused by pre-ignition. Do not use anti-seize or lubricant on NGK spark plugs. It is completely unnecessary and can be detrimental.
 

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The piston travel distance will be the same on exhaust & compression strokes.

If you are using NGK plugs, NGK says this about using anti-seize:
NGK spark plugs feature trivalent plating. This silver or chrome-colored finish on the threads is designed to provide corrosion resistance against moisture and chemicals. The coating also acts as a release agent during spark plug removal. NGK spark plugs are installed at the factory dry, without lubrication or anti-seize.
Anti-seize can act as a lubricant, altering torque values up to 20 percent, increasing the risk of spark plug thread breakage and/or metal shell stretch. Thread breakage can sometimes involve removing the cylinder head for repair. Metal shell stretch changes the heat rating of the spark plug and can result in serious engine damage caused by pre-ignition. Do not use anti-seize or lubricant on NGK spark plugs. It is completely unnecessary and can be detrimental.
Thank you for the plug information, I’ll leave well enough alone.
The two points of resistance pulling the starter rope are pretty close together on the same pull. You have to pull the rope another time or two to get back around to that point again. So, I would think that one (or both) of those points of resistance are on the compression stroke. I thought Honda incorporated some type of decompression technology to make their engines easier to pull start, and didn’t know if this was confusing things.
 

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The two points of resistance pulling the starter rope are pretty close together on the same pull.
I might suggest that you take the valve cover off and watch the valve positioning as you pull the rope. You can learn the "feel" of the compression stroke. You should see Intake, Compression, Power, and Exhaust strokes. It should look similar to this:
 
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