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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The Honda manual says the oil capacity is 1.16 quarts; however, after adding just a quart, the level was at the top of the oil filler cap stem. I ran the engine for ~ 5 minutes, checked again and it was at the same level so there was no room to add any additional. Am I missing something?

Thanks
 

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There’s always some residual oil in the engine after draining. Next time tilt the unit to see if you can drain a little bit more? The stated capacity is usually measured at initial fill but the actual amount removed isn’t always the full stated amount. Follow the oil level check method as stated in the manual. Make sure that you’re reading the dipstick properly, and read the oil line in good light.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Good question. It was sitting lengthwise on a cement walk that appeared perfectly level; however, I just threw a level on the surface. From side to side, it was sitting perfectly level. Lengthwise, the exhaust side was ~ 1/4 bubble lower.
 

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It doesn't take much of a slope to throw the oil level off. BTDT
Also as mentioned, tilting the gen will help get all of the previous oil out of the unit.
 

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It doesn't take much of a slope to throw the oil level off. BTDT
Also as mentioned, tilting the gen will help get all of the previous oil out of the unit.
True... I had one of my generator on a furniture dolly and due to the vibration, I didn't notice that it has shifted slightly to one side. Only found that out when the oil started pouring out of the oil fill neck while checking on the oil level.

+1 also on tilting the generator to get as much of the old oil out. I get maybe half a cup of "extra" oil by just tilting the gen. Most of those metal shavings sinks to the bottom and it helps to get as much of them out to make the oil change more worthwhile.

I see some people using oil vacuum pumps to suck oil out of the block through the filler neck. I guess it's quick and clean when you're on the clock, but I can't help but think that there will always be enough of the old stuff left in there and it's going to be something that will keep me awake all night. :ROFLMAO:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Can I ask one more question... I see many opinions advising use of synthetic oil for generators, given they can run for extended periods and especially when in hot climates.
Then, there's the Honda petroleum-based motor oil that's promoted as being formulated for high revving, 4-stroke engines like the EU7000iS. One might think they would know what works best in their engines?
 

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Can I ask one more question... I see many opinions advising use of synthetic oil for generators, given they can run for extended periods and especially when in hot climates.
Then, there's the Honda petroleum-based motor oil that's promoted as being formulated for high revving, 4-stroke engines like the EU7000iS. One might think they would know what works best in their engines?
You will get mostly anecdotal responses.

By my interpretation, the Honda "standard" oil should be fine if you change it religiously and you don't run the generator for extended periods frequently. But if you're really clocking in the hours.... running the generator through long power outages, you may get better engine performance and longevity from using a reputable fully-synthetic oil.

If you want a more scientific approach, run each type of oil on your generator under similar conditions and have the used oils undergo Used Oil Analysis (UOA). That way, you will know for sure which oil provides better engine protection. The analysis will also tell you if you can extend (or should reduce) the Oil Change Interval (OCI) to get the most out of that particular type of oil.
 

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Like already mentioned, level unit for the oil drain with a tilt (if you can) for the remaining oil. There have been on occasion what I've found with some engines to have what I refer to as 'a lazy drain'. Crankcase design is my reasoning.
With such instances, (and if you have one), using an air gun attachment from an air compressor inserted into the oil fill location can yield a surprising amount of the last reminants out of the drain. No need to go full blast and over power it with the air, you'll find it doesnt take much air pressure to get results.
One might think they would know what works best in their engines?
Obviously if they recommend it then it 'should' prove to be a good product, I myself would be using a quality brand name synthetic of proper weight. I imagine they'd be OK with that as long as said oil met their oil requirements. I cant be sure but I would think your 7000 owners manual probably includes a section on the subject.
They're making the suggestion/recommendation, but really it comes down to being your call.
 

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I like the Amsoil Synthetic Small Engine Oil myself. Your generator has an emissions system, I believe, that could be detrimentally affected by the use of incorrect oil, so don’t use just any oil. Here’s a link on the oil topic from not too long ago…

 

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Something that I failed to mention is to change the oil with the engine warmed up first and then drain it as soon as possible. This thins the oil so that it drains much better, and it also gets the crud in the oil in suspension so that it can flow out with the oil change.

Also, when running the gen it should be level. This is the same concept of filling it with oil. Splash-lubricated engines can be very picky about under or over oiling when the gen is off level.

Regarding the oil, I am not sure where you are seeing the non-synthetic oil being recommended over full synthetic. Honda does promote their oil, but then they (1) expect that the oil is changed on schedule, (2) they know the properties of their oil vs a cheap store brand, and (3) they get to sell you oil.

The manual states this:
Rectangle Font Parallel Number Slope

So, an API SJ 4-stroke oil could be non-synthetic, semi-synthetic, or full synthetic. I will be less diplomatic than above comments and say to always use a full synthetic after break-in.

Years ago I was using non-synthetic oil in my lawn mower. At the end of the mowing season the oil would be coal black and nasty. I switched to full synthetic oil and now the oil at the end of the mowing season looks like it is new oil. I attribute this to the higher operating temperatures that full synthetic oil can achieve before breaking down. These engines are air-cooled and often run hotter than your car engine. I am not necessarily promoting Mobil1, but here is good info on the differences between conventional and synthetic oil. If you don't mind the expense, there are also oils specially designed for small air-cooled engines.
 

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After the break-in period, I don't think it really matters too much what oil you use as long it meets Honda's published/recommended weight and type. This assumes that you change it regularly. There are lots of specialty oils out there including those specific to small engines like the Amsoil example mentioned above, but I'd have to see some repeatable statistical data comparing various types of oils running on a normal oil change schedule to be convinced that it actually makes a large enough difference to justify the price difference when compared to lower priced standard and synthetic oils. Project Farm has done a bunch of videos comparing different oils, but I've not seen anything to convince me to spend the extra money when I'm changing the oil on schedule or before and not running the generator too hard or in extreme climates.

That being said, I don't have a ton of small engine experience and I only have about 73 hours on my generator. If reliable data comes along to convince me that I'm making a mistake, I would gladly change my perspective.
 

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I’ve personally experienced several power outages over the years that were several days in length. One incident was just shy of 3 weeks. Granted long outages are rare, but the premium lubes that I prefer to use have a safety margin, namely long drain capability, that gives me peace of mind when the emergency situation doesn’t allow for timely maintenance. During several lengthy outages neighbours were losing tractor engines due to the severe duty these tractors were suddenly subjected to. The over all cost for a good oil isn’t always much more…if any.
 

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I’ve personally experienced several power outages over the years that were several days in length. One incident was just shy of 3 weeks. Granted long outages are rare, but the premium lubes that I prefer to use have a safety margin, namely long drain capability, that gives me peace of mind when the emergency situation doesn’t allow for timely maintenance. On several lengthy outages neighbours were losing tractor engines due to the severe duty these tractors were suddenly subjected to. The over all cost for a good oil isn’t always much more…if any.
Good point. Now that I have a battery backup system for primary outage duty where I'll only be using the generator to recharge the batteries, I don't worry so much about the oil and maintenance any longer. Even for multiple day outages, the Honda will run a few hours a day at best.
 

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you are forgetting the magic oil magnets as well.
both the drain plug and the dip stick.
that helps with the BIG drain issue of metal trash left in the sump bottom.

if you do the oil change on time or early on new engines you should be set!
just make sure to use a good quality oil and drain as much as you can out.
i use a fresh 32 oz condiment bottle for filling oil these days so i do not over fill.
handy for the top off thing.

and yes make a good run base or run platform for your gen set with a built in way to secure the gen set.
or just build a good gen shack.
and leave room to be able to service the gen in place while in the shack.
 

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Yeppers on the magnets. I became a firm believer after I bought my first Toyota truck in 1985, still drive Toyotas, and all the drain plugs (engine/trans) are magnetic. Wow on the steel goop they caught on the break-in oil! All my small Honda engines have Gold-plug magnetic plugs and my newest Harley has Dimple plugs. If there’s no filtration it’s a no-brainer for me…
 
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