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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
In an odd stroke of luck, I got gifted an air compressor from my grandad, it's a vertical 60 Gallon 6.5HP 240Volt Twin-cylinder Oil-free Craftsman sitting dusty in the barn. He's replaced the pump a few times because the pistons busted. He got a good deal on a portable 30-gallon Dewalt compressor and put the craftsman to the side until later, but he needs the space it's taking up. I'm wanting to know if switching to an oil-lubricated pump would get this thing going again for a long while (and if that's even possible), or if there's something else that might be causing the pump to bust. I know he has a dremel, an impact and some other air tools I've glanced but never seen used that he likely used with the Craftsman, but I couldn't tell you if it was used heavily or not as the only thing I ever remember being in his garage was the DeWalt he has now. The thing doesn't look that old, best guess is maybe 5-10 years or less. If there's any way I can get it in working order so I can put it to use I'd like to try it.
Thanks!
~Ken
 

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KenMathisHD,

To do that depends on a few things. Your skill level with mechanics, electrical, welding and fabrication skills if needed and time. Of course you could convert it if you had unlimited money, time and skills, guess your asking if it's worth it to take on the project. I have built a few compressors in my day from parts sources and rigged up/designed acceptable results. The first question is how much space is available on the tank mounting platform and is this a belt type or direct drive machine? I find the hardest part at the end is building a belt guard/cover that allows air to go through it.

Stephen
In an odd stroke of luck, I got gifted an air compressor from my grandad, it's a vertical 60 Gallon 6.5HP 240Volt Twin-cylinder Oil-free Craftsman sitting dusty in the barn. He's replaced the pump a few times because the pistons busted. He got a good deal on a portable 30-gallon Dewalt compressor and put the craftsman to the side until later, but he needs the space it's taking up. I'm wanting to know if switching to an oil-lubricated pump would get this thing going again for a long while (and if that's even possible), or if there's something else that might be causing the pump to bust. I know he has a dremel, an impact and some other air tools I've glanced but never seen used that he likely used with the Craftsman, but I couldn't tell you if it was used heavily or not as the only thing I ever remember being in his garage was the DeWalt he has now. The thing doesn't look that old, best guess is maybe 5-10 years or less. If there's any way I can get it in working order so I can put it to use I'd like to try it.
Thanks!
~Ken
 

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6 HP oiless

I looked at 6.5 HP Sears oiless design and see little space to mount a separate motor and pump. You would have to throw out motor and pump, weld on "ears" and plates to extend the mounting platform and buy a lot of parts, then fabricate a belt guard. Not an easy solution and probably not worth it.
Best recommendation is to store the tank somewhere out of the way (outside, in attic) and hook up a portable compressor big enough for your needs.

Stephen
 

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Discussion Starter #4
KenMathisHD,

To do that depends on a few things. Your skill level with mechanics, electrical, welding and fabrication skills if needed and time. Of course you could convert it if you had unlimited money, time and skills, guess your asking if it's worth it to take on the project. I have built a few compressors in my day from parts sources and rigged up/designed acceptable results. The first question is how much space is available on the tank mounting platform and is this a belt type or direct drive machine? I find the hardest part at the end is building a belt guard/cover that allows air to go through it.

Stephen
Stephen,

It started off life as a direct drive machine, though I don't think I'm going to keep it that way. I doubt I will be using much of the original equipment aside from the tank itself, and a belt conversion certainly sounds like a good way to go. I'm fairly good with mechanics, I've looked into what I might need to do for electrical as far as wiring it up, I have a grandad and a neighbor with welding experience, both have said they would be up to showing me how to weld what I need to. I have time on my hands - I'm getting bored coming home every night with nothing much to do, and money isn't in too short a supply thankfully. I figured I might as well do something with the tank if I can and learn a bit while doing it.

Ken
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I looked at 6.5 HP Sears oiless design and see little space to mount a separate motor and pump. You would have to throw out motor and pump, weld on "ears" and plates to extend the mounting platform and buy a lot of parts, then fabricate a belt guard. Not an easy solution and probably not worth it.
Best recommendation is to store the tank somewhere out of the way (outside, in attic) and hook up a portable compressor big enough for your needs.

Stephen
I was thinking about designing the setup on one plate then drilling the bolt pattern into the new plate and bolting it to the existing mounting plate to keep from having to get close to the tank with the welder. Then if the tank goes bad later on I could switch the whole setup to a new tank with minimal hassle. Would that not work?

Ken
 

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Tank modifications

Ken,

I wouldn't worry about welding on the platform itself. after all the platform was welded at the factory to the tank originally, just don't weld on the tank itself. A thin plate less than 3/8 inches would just bend under load. I think 1/8 angle iron frame straddling existing mount and putting a 3/16 plate on top of that would give you the support without adding too much weight. Welding it all together would increase overall strength and with a "metal glue gun" mig welder almost any one can do it. I would get the motor, pump and pulley/belt setup loose on the floor to see just how big you would have to make the platform. I hope you plan to bolt compressor to the floor when project is finished. your top heavy changes were probably not foreseen in original tank foot design. You also have to account for the entrances to the tank for pressure switch, check valve piping and safety blow off valve.
This project is only for someone who has the skills and lots of time to work it out, more of a hobby solution than a practical one. Myself having the skills, all of the tools and an eccentric personality, I like to take on these projects but that being said, only about 10% of my projects actually saved me any money and certainly they weren't the quickest or the most practical/cost effective solutions.

Stephen

I was thinking about designing the setup on one plate then drilling the bolt pattern into the new plate and bolting it to the existing mounting plate to keep from having to get close to the tank with the welder. Then if the tank goes bad later on I could switch the whole setup to a new tank with minimal hassle. Would that not work?

Ken
 

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Ken,

You might buy a "Tank less unit" with a base already created and just mount that. Would simplify the design effort with belt guard included!

https://www.alibaba.com/product-detail/4HP-electric-motor-tankless-portable-cheap_60383120002.html

https://www.zoro.com/speedaire-electric-air-compressor-3-hp-4b243/i/G2905646/ 3/phase oops!

Ken,

I wouldn't worry about welding on the platform itself. after all the platform was welded at the factory to the tank originally, just don't weld on the tank itself. A thin plate less than 3/8 inches would just bend under load. I think 1/8 angle iron frame straddling existing mount and putting a 3/16 plate on top of that would give you the support without adding too much weight. Welding it all together would increase overall strength and with a "metal glue gun" mig welder almost any one can do it. I would get the motor, pump and pulley/belt setup loose on the floor to see just how big you would have to make the platform. I hope you plan to bolt compressor to the floor when project is finished. your top heavy changes were probably not foreseen in original tank foot design. You also have to account for the entrances to the tank for pressure switch, check valve piping and safety blow off valve.
This project is only for someone who has the skills and lots of time to work it out, more of a hobby solution than a practical one. Myself having the skills, all of the tools and an eccentric personality, I like to take on these projects but that being said, only about 10% of my projects actually saved me any money and certainly they weren't the quickest or the most cost effective solutions.

Stephen
 
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