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OK Guys & Girls, here's a situation and a question. I have looked everywhere on the internet and can detect only vague answers.
I am moving in to a new leased shop space. It is in an almost "retail" environment, but it's perfect for my needs. I need to run a compressor for a cabinet style sandblaster which will be used infrequently as well as a HVLP paint gun, also infrequently. I use compressed air mostly for minor uses around the shop, but one needs to serve one's largest need.
I can run a compressor all night with no neighbors to worry about. I would like to install a very large tank, say, 250 gallons in the shop. I would like to fill the tank to 120 psi with a small compressor. I would think that the controlling issue would be the ability of said compressor to reach the desired limit and not over heat. If one were to apply a cut-off thermostat to the head of the compressor and adjust it to supply power to the compressor only when it was in a "comfort range", what would be the/any problem?
I know I must do my homework on the greatest volume I would expect to use in any given day. Ideally, I could use a compressor like the GMC Syclone 6310 Ultra Quiet & Oil-Free unit. Have my cake and eat it too?
Steve
 

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Hello! Been there. Ran a 3hp, 12 gallon, oiless Craftsman for 20 years, coupled to two 80 gallon aux tanks. Air was always made. Never a compressor issue, and it took 30 minutes or so to fill the tanks. Had air for EVERYTHING!
 

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if you are worried about overheating the compressor the first thing you need to do is make sure that it has 100% unobstructed air flow to it so that it can cool properly second keep it clean so that there is not a build-up of dust, dirt, and general grime on the cooling fins. the only other thing i can think of is to install a thermostatically controlled vent fan near the compressor that way if it gets above what you feel is a safe temp for the compressor the fan will kick on and help pull air past the compressor to cool it more.
 

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Richard I see you are new but please don't add to old posts just to build up the number of posts you have. If you have something to add fine but don't just say hi. This isn't Face Book. Roger
 

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What you need a compressor with a 100% duty cycle.
Those cheap small compressors ahve a duty cycle of 50% maybe. You need to let them cool down for 10 minutes after every 10 minutes of operation. Chere here for more info on duty cycle: Air compressor buying guide, part 3: compressor specifications

if you buy a proper, quality compressor, it will have a duty cycle of 100% and is able to run for days, weeks and months wihout stopping.

If you really want an air compressor below 100% duty cycle, you could maybe install ti after a timing realy, which will start and stop the compressor every 10 minutes during the night.

Other than that, great idea and it should work.
 
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