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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I Have a coleman Powermate maxa 4000
4000run /5000max watt generator RPM 3600, Phase-single,
power factor-1, Duty-Cont., insul CI-F,Amps 33.3/ 16.7

AC Output power 120/240/ VAC 60Hz

Output recepticals
(1) 120v 15 amp Duplex / nema 5-15R
(1) 240v 15 amp Duplex / nema 6-15R

manual shows:
120 V, 20 Ampere Duplex Receptacle
This duplex is split so that 20 amps of current may be
drawn from each half of the receptacle. However, total power
drawn must be kept within nameplate ratings. These
receptacles may be used along with the 240 volt receptacle
provided the generator is not overloaded.

Circuit Breakers
The receptacles are protected by an AC circuit breaker.


My question is: Option # I . can I connect each receptacle (from the split duplex receptacle to each leg of of
my home electrical panel (using a 20amp breaker). and will I get independent power of 20amp service from each leg?
and would it power my 240v needs.

each 120v receptacle from the generator will be connected to a separate leg and will be connected
using there own power wire and neutral (connect to panel bus bar). and (where should i connect the ground, to the box or bus?)
 

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What model is your generator?

It should work fine BUT what 240 volt needs do you have?

I'd replace the 6-15r with an L14-20r. You need to separate the neutral/ground bond in your generator, unless it is switched by your transfer switch, to be code compliant.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
aandpdan,

It's a coleman, model # PM0524000 .


I left out the "120V " part in My Question #1: so let me rephrase the question.

My question is: Option # I . can I connect each receptacle (from the split 120V duplex receptacle to each leg of of my home electrical panel (using a 20 amp breaker). and will I get independent power of 15amp service from each leg?
and would it power my 240v needs.

So, does that mean that using the split 120V duplex I would get approx: 16.7 amps running to from each receptacle, to each leg of my house electrical panel? and in theory have a combined power of 33.3 amps to still power my 240V well pump.


From what see from the tech specs for that model show 15amps, should i use 15 amp or 20amp breaker switches feeding the home panel from the generator.
Note! the generator receptacles are protected by its own AC circuit breakers. " which I would guess be 15amps".


I really have no need to hook up using the 240 6-15R, as long as the 120V option works. I can always upgrade/rewire later with a newer generator using the current L14 recepticales.
 

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Ahh, the well pump.

You will not get 33.3 amps for the well pump, you get 16.7.

At 240 volts, 4000 watts = 16.667 amps.
At 120 volts, 4000 watts = 33.333 amps.

Watts is the measure of power and what you should base your loads on.

On most transfer panels or an interlock, the breaker size is based on the wiring from the generator inlet - if you have one. If you use 15 amp breakers you will protect the generator from overload, something that could happen with a 20 amp breakers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So, if I don't use the 240V circuit to power my well pump, and just use my 120V split duplex connections from each receptacle of the generator to each leg of my electric panel, enough to run selected 120V circuits as needed, (fridge,sump, furnace, etc.) I should be ok.

Would I still be getting 16.7amps from the generators "split duplex 15 amp" receptacle to each leg of the panel? if so, i could live without the well pump for awhile if needed…

I should possibly be able run my well pump (230V 9.6amps) if needed after turning other circuits off (minimum usage) using the setup described above, correct?

My biggest worry would be (would this setup) damage , overload, or short out my pump, if trying to use the 240V circuit?
 

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Yes, you could probably use your well pump - it depends on the starting current - if you shut the other loads off.

Yes, 16.7 amps per leg off of the split receptacle, 33.3 combined OR 16.7 amps off of the 240.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
So, sounds as everything should be just fine. "thanks, for all your help"

Here's my plan for wiring from my generator from my split 120V duplex receptacle, to each leg of my panel"

Line #1 - split 120V recepticale #1
male " 5-15 Plug with 6" cord " green attached to conduit/box (my ground) box in garage, the other wires 12ga. BLACK/load and WHITE/neutral
running through conduit and coming out at my panel, the black using 15amp breaker for hot and connecting the white/neutral to the buss bar…

Line #2 split 120V recepticale #2
male " 5-15 Plug with 6" cord " green attached to conduit/box (my ground) box in garage, the other wires 12ga. RED/load and WHITE/neutral
running through conduit and coming out at my panel, the Red connected to15amp breaker for hot and connecting the white/neutral to the buss bar…

I just thought each circuit w should have its own neutral, ground, and hot . just playing it safe…

12 ga. twisted or solid ( from garage to box is approx 25' +another 25' of extension cord out to my generator.

Am I good to go with this?
 

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How are you making the connections at the panel? You are using an approved interlock or transfer switch - right?

You only need one neutral and one ground. Look up MWBC (Multi-Wire Branch Circuit) and you'll see why.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yes! Definitely, I would incorporate the use of an Interlock switch, if legal in Illinois, otherwise some kind of transfer switch.

So, you mean by using a Multi-Wire Branch Circuit setup i should wire it this way:

(circuit #1) Black, left leg of panel hot
(circuit #2) Red, Right leg of panel hot (pin the 2, 15amp breakers) or use (1 15amp 240V breaker.)

(1 ) white shared with circuits 1 & 2, connected to any bus on either side on box.

what about the ground? should I run a separate green wire down to the panel (and where do I connect it?) or just ground it direct to my conduit line?
 

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You can run a green wire to the grounding bar in the panel. If it's the main panel then the neutral and ground are bonded.

Your transfer switch or interlock should tell you what to use. I use an interlock and it uses a 2 pole (240 volt) breaker with a common trip bar.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
aandpdan,

here is what I came up with, Because of the output limitations of my generator...

I chose the “split ” 120V Duplex receptcale, because it has a hot, neutral, & ground
and 15amps of current may be drawn from each half of the receptacle. for a total of 30amps.

and I can make a adapter using a 2 x 5-15 plugs and combine them to create a L14-30 Receptcale. and have a the new standard 4 prong setup for the future

The 240V Receptcale 6-16R does not have a seperate ground and neutral, I believe there “bonded”. that’s why I passed on it.

would this setup be fine to use? see attached image file.
 

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You need an "inlet" not a receptacle on that panel.

You're making a "suicide" cord to interconnect. The plug will be energized if you have the generator running. What happens if you had to, for some reason, disconnect it quickly and dropped it with the generator still running?

Where's your interlock?

Technically what you're doing will work. It's just not safe and wouldn't pass inspection.

Use the 20 amp breaker. Your generator has it's own protection.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
(1) Your right about the inlet, that's a easy change.
(2) I would never think of wiring this without at the very least using an interlock (forgot to add it it into my drawing).
(3) using a 20amp breaker, good idea.

I can see you point (didn't think about that scenario) so my, only option would be to run off one of the 240V 6-15 receptcales at the generator output.

So, now I'm back to wiring my house panel with 3 prong setup. like I stated earlier, The 240V Receptcale 6-16R does not have a separate ground and neutral, "I believe there “bonded inside the generator” could that setup create a dangerous ground and damage my appliances and motors?

Help! How would you approach this 3 prong 240V connection setup and still be safe and correct? I can't afford the newer 4 prong 240V generator.
 

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I'm glad the interlock stuff is out of the way :)

So, now I'm back to wiring my house panel with 3 prong setup. like I stated earlier, The 240V Receptcale 6-16R does not have a separate ground and neutral, "I believe there “bonded inside the generator” could that setup create a dangerous ground and damage my appliances and motors?

Help! How would you approach this 3 prong 240V connection setup and still be safe and correct? I can't afford the newer 4 prong 240V generator.
More than likely you'll find that the neutral and grounds, on the 120v receptacles are bonded already. Even wiring it as you have shown won't solve that problem. In effect, the hot terminal on each 120v receptacle goes to either side of the 240v receptacle and the neutral/grounds to the ground pin on the 240v receptacle.

If you can take a picture of the generator end, where the receptacles are, maybe we can find the bonding jumper.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·

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That should be all you need to do, remove that bonding wire.

I'd still change out the 240 volt outlet you have for a 4 pin L14-20R. The two "hots" you already have. Connect the neutral on the receptacle to the white at the 120v receptacle and connect your ground to the frame.

Done.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I believe I will perform the update to my generator using the "L14-20" 4 prong setup for the future, by removing the generator bonding wire, and changing out the 240 volt outlet for a 4 pin L14-20R.

here's my plan, at the generator:
(1) connect the 2 hots, to the 2 hots the L14-20 receptacle.
(2) connect the white the 120v generator receptacle from the to the neutral to the L14-20 receptacle.
(3) connect my ground to the generator frame and run it to the ground to the L14-20 receptacle.

My house wiring would consist of, at the start using:
A L14-20 Inlet from a box in the garage, running 12ga soiid wire, 2 hots,1 neutral through metal conduit into my electrical panel, the 2 hots connected to a dual 20amp breaker, and the 1 neutral to my neutral buss.

since I am using metal conduit, can I connect the ground wire from the inlet plug at the box, or run it all the way down to my electrical pane and connect to the ground there?

Besides my ground connection I have one last question.
I live in Kane County, illinois. would you or anyone out there know if, Is it legal/code to use Interlock switches?

would I be good to go with this?
 

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Your plan sounds solid.

Check with your AJH, wiring inspector, about the interlock.

Metal (emt or rigid) conduit is acceptable as a ground.
 
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