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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I haven't found much on how clean the power is on either the Champion or Duromax offerings. Any input from the brain trust here?

The two models I'm looking at are:
Duromax xp4500ih (
Champion 4650 dual fuel/elec start (model # 201120)

The Duromax appears to be a noticeable increase in cost, around $400 or so more from what I see. Is there something in that price difference that is worth the extra $? IE - quality, reliability, cleanliness, quietness?

My primary concern is the cleanliness of power. What option is safest for sensitive electronics?
 

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I think the consensus is Champion might be better? Both are manufactured in China, but we hope Champion USA has tighter reigns on the design and manufacturing than other Chinese brands.
 

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I think they both re-sell Chinese designed generators. I have a DuroMax XP9000iH and a Champion 100519 and both those models are sold under different brands, although sometimes with slight modifications. The quality on both is pretty good, but the build quality on the XP9000iH has really impressed me. My fear with both brands is long-term part availability. I would have no concerns on sourcing Honda or Yamaha parts years after buying the generator.
 

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That is valuable information. Being able to fix things later is important, for sure, and that information would be extremely valuable in the fixing.
I have a Champion 200913. It ran for about 50 hours straight after the outage from Hurricane Ida last September. It didn't miss a beat. Large fuel tank and plenty of power. I had it paralleled with a Wen GN400i. We had all the power we needed. The only thing we were concerned about was finding gasoline, although we had stocked quite a bit of it before the storm hit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'm not a fan of paralleling generators. That's just me. I can't get my head around the idea of running 2 engines.

My "regular" generator is a Honda EU2200i. I bought it with the intention of getting a 2nd one with the 30a outlet for paralleling. However, the more I thought about it the less I liked that idea.

Honda doesn't have a 4000-4500w class inverter generator, otherwise I'd be really tempted to get one. The 3000 options are too small and the 7000 option is too big.

2x EU2200's would get me in that ^4000w range, but it requires running 2x engines. I'd rather get a single unit that can run that amount of power.

The champion is sounding like the better option. We'll see where things go this season. The ^4000w class would cover the majority of our longer term backup power needs - running AC when camping for a few days, general home back up. Portable power needs the EU2200 is easy to fire up to run a tool or something, but unless we are running pretty light on power needs elsewhere (camping, home) its just too small.
 

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I'm not a fan of paralleling generators. That's just me. I can't get my head around the idea of running 2 engines.

My "regular" generator is a Honda EU2200i. I bought it with the intention of getting a 2nd one with the 30a outlet for paralleling. However, the more I thought about it the less I liked that idea.

Honda doesn't have a 4000-4500w class inverter generator, otherwise I'd be really tempted to get one. The 3000 options are too small and the 7000 option is too big.

2x EU2200's would get me in that ^4000w range, but it requires running 2x engines. I'd rather get a single unit that can run that amount of power.

The champion is sounding like the better option. We'll see where things go this season. The ^4000w class would cover the majority of our longer term backup power needs - running AC when camping for a few days, general home back up. Portable power needs the EU2200 is easy to fire up to run a tool or something, but unless we are running pretty light on power needs elsewhere (camping, home) its just too small.
It's really a compromise. A single 4kW generator is going to be more efficient when loaded to capacity compared to a pair of 2kW gens. But what paralleling affords you is two-fold...

First, you can choose to start just one gen when there's no need for the full 4kW. This will lower your fuel consumption significantly during a long-term outage.

Second, in an unfortunate event where one gen fails, you still have a backup gen. Albeit, at half capacity.
 

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It's really a compromise. A single 4kW generator is going to be more efficient when loaded to capacity compared to a pair of 2kW gens. But what paralleling affords you is two-fold...

First, you can choose to start just one gen when there's no need for the full 4kW. This will lower your fuel consumption significantly during a long-term outage.

Second, in an unfortunate event where one gen fails, you still have a backup gen. Albeit, at half capacity.
Exactly. Parallel operation of inverters is about scalability. During the outage last September I ran both inverters during the day. At night, I only needed to power a pair of window shakers and some LED floodlights. That allowed me to shut down one of the inverters overnight, saving a lot of fuel. The outage lasted 5 days and gasoline became very difficult to come by. A lot of people only had about 5 to 10 gallons of gas on hand and they ran through that in the first 36 hours. After that, they began mobbing and draining the stations dry. We were able to avoid all of that insanity by being able to use fuel as efficiently as possible. I would have never been able to do that if I only had one huge inverter. If fuel in your area remains easily available, or you can stock a lot of it prior to the outage, I guess it doesn't really matter one way or the other. For me, fuel almost always becomes an issue, though, during a long outage. As it turns out, I was down to my last 5 gallon can when the lights blinked back on again.
 

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Reviews for Genmax equipment seem to be generally favorable. My guess is that it's another prototypical Chinese clone inverter. The big one doesn't have parallel capability, although they say they are going to be adding the feature on future models. I would guess quality is likely on par with Duromax, Wen, and Predator. Price is in line with that group.
 

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i can scale up to 4 of the eu2200i gens when the power is needed...
99% of the time all i need is one for winter....
and 2 for summer when the temps are below 90 deg f...
and yes spare gens are a great idea!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks for all the input.

I already have redundancy in generators. So there isn't much to gain in that respect with another EU2200i, other than a spare for parts. In that case, I don't have specific unit redundancy with swap-able parts. As far as power goes - we have other units if one goes down.

As to running a lighter generator when the power demand isn't there - same thing now. The EU2200i is there for the light power requirements. So if I need heavier power the ~4500w unit would be there for that.

For home backup that would be the preferred unit - the ~4500w - for regular use. It has the head room that the EU2200 does not have. With the EU2200 we can't run a microwave, unless it is the only load. Even trimming down to essential loads that still is heavy for the EU2200. Stepping up to the ~4500w class unit would make the trimmed down load a lot easier and give the head room to run a microwave - and a room AC unit. Truth be told, the EU2000 will run the room AC, but not with the trimmed electrical load - maybe with a couple LED lights, small fan, and a phone charger, but that would be a load. We do that with the AC camping now but it is a load. Another reason for the ~4500w unit (though big for camping, but I'd rather go that way than something like the size of an EU3000 - just not a big enough step up from the EU2200 in my opinion).
 

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change out the microwave to a panasonic inverter microwave.
they will run on the eu2000i or the eu2200i gens.
and with meters on the electrical panel inside the house you can choose the load..
and you can turn off the air con for the short time you are running the microwave.
have you changed the stove over to NG or LP?
or you can use the grill with a side burner for cooking if you have a sheltered cooking station outside.
i am still thinking about a summer kitchen like on the old farms.
basic cooking shack just for summer.

yea the eu7000is is a good choice for cooking...
and it will run a few portable inverter air con units.
 
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