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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Everyone,

I have a Champion generator and have had a problem with the fuel cap rusting to the point where flakes of metal end up in the tank. Although a plastic gas tank or gas cap is not available for my model (46515), I saw a extended fuel kit for Honda generators and it got me thinking.

Could I remove the fuel line to the gas tank and replace it with a longer fuel line that goes straight into a separate plastic gas tank? Before I started down this path I wanted to see if anyone else has ever tried this.

Appreciate any comments and suggestions.
 

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Probably if you keep the new tank about the same or a slightly higher height than the old tank, assuming that it is gravity feed. Even my little Honda EU2000( plastic tank & cap) can use an external tank with a special or modified gas tank cap. This Gen has a little fuel pump and as it sucks gas out of the on board tank with the external tank connected it sucks gas out of it, into the on board tank and then into the carburetor. With that set up and a large external tank I can run it nonstop for several days without refueling.
 

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IMHO, if you don't have access to a Mfg. designed and available kit I'd steer clear of it. What you could "imagineer" with odds and ends from the local auto parts dealer will probably work. It's just the thought of an aftermarket tank and connectors, particularly gravity fed potentially allowing "X" gallons of gas to leak onto or near a running genset doesn't sound too safe.

We've had a couple of old gas tractors here on the farm and were able to get the gas tanks relined and one of them the nozzle and gas cap replaced. Wasn't cheap but it kept them going. If rust and sediment is your issue, perhaps adding a couple of inline gravity fuel filters in parallel would be the inexpensive way to go. I mention gravity fuel filters as there are different fuel filters depending on whether the engine is gravity fed or has a fuel pump. Gravity fed has a larger micron size filter as I recall.
 

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IMHO, if you don't have access to a Mfg. designed and available kit I'd steer clear of it. What you could "imagineer" with odds and ends from the local auto parts dealer will probably work. It's just the thought of an aftermarket tank and connectors, particularly gravity fed potentially allowing "X" gallons of gas to leak onto or near a running genset doesn't sound too safe.

We've had a couple of old gas tractors here on the farm and were able to get the gas tanks relined and one of them the nozzle and gas cap replaced. Wasn't cheap but it kept them going. If rust and sediment is your issue, perhaps adding a couple of inline gravity fuel filters in parallel would be the inexpensive way to go. I mention gravity fuel filters as there are different fuel filters depending on whether the engine is gravity fed or has a fuel pump. Gravity fed has a larger micron size filter as I recall.
I'm not aware of any Mfg. designed and available kit from Champion for an extended run tank. My model 100233 has a plastic cap and tank so I don't have a rust problem but I sure would like to get some more run time out of mine. It only has a 1.6 gallon tank, my only complaint with this generator. I've fought the urge to do something like Boston Dan is proposing but the urge keeps returning.
 

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I would think that a search on eBay or Amazon would turn up a gas cap, or even a whole tank with cap, that would replace yours. Post pictures of your cap from above and below next to a ruler...
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks everyone for the help. I'm still leaning towards bypassing the metal fuel tank all together, removing the fuel line to the gas tank, and replacing the fuel line with a longer fuel line that goes straight into a separate plastic gas tank. I'm hoping that I can place the gas tank next to the generator so it wouldn't be gravity fed - instead it would be purely suction powered by the intake stroke of the engine. The Honda solution looks like it is purely suction driven. For a little more detail, my plan is to modify the existing gas cap on a standard gas tank and add both a fuel line that reaches the bottom of the tank and a breather vent. I'm probably a couple of weeks from doing this but will update this thread once I'm able to get things going.

Thanks Again Everyone!!!!
 

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Does your generator have a fuel pump? Add an electric one? Add a connection for a vacuum pump?
bad idea on the electric fuel pump.
way too much pressure.

yup on the vac pump. those work well.

just modify with a T valve a fuel selector.
and put a marine male fuel coupler on the gen.
then use good marine fuel hose with dual female couplers.
I use an inline with quick couplers hand pump to pre charge the line with fuel.
then take the pump out of the line.
cool setup, berg style.
the trick to the berg fuel system is the vac fuel pump.
big note: "you do not want to gravity flow the fuel on a berg fuel system"

we use these on the honda eu2000i and eu2200i gens.
click here for the honda gen repair site
the parts lists are in the extended run fuel section.
 

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First I would try for a new fuel tank cap. Now if you do want extended run, put a T fitting in the line from the existing tank. Probably a couple of small ball shut off valves, one between existing tank and the T, the other on an extended line for an extra tank. Get a marine tank, like for an outboard motor and some of the quick disconnects for gasoline designed for the marine application. One right at the shutoff at the T the other at the extra tank and then a line as long as you want. Not knowing how much suction your champion engine might have, I think it would be best to keep the extra tank about the same height as the built in tank, put it too low it might not feed and starve the engine, too high and it might flood the engine, so keep things within design parameters.
 

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Iowa, wasn't suggesting an electric fuel pump, was asking what the plans are. Do champion generators even have a fuel pump? Here's a kit which includes a vacuum pump. The OP neglected to mention what generator he has.

.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks again everyone for the additional replies.

My generator doesn't have a fuel pump. It's a Champion model 46515. As I mentioned, I'm hoping the intake stroke of the engine will have enough vacuum on its own to draw fuel into the carburetor.

Iowagold and jkingrph- Thanks very much for the details - very helpful.
 

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I would use an off the shelf 5 gallon can or maybe a bit bigger and use it remotely, gravity fed. I think, doing so, will give you flexibility of tank sizes.
 

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I'm very confused on using an off the shelf gas tank (boat tank) to gravity feed a generator without a fuel pump. I don't think you will get a consistent flow after you pump the bulb up. Ideas on this??
 

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My experience with siphon hoses (and I've had a bunch of them): If you get a good flow going and maintain that flow it will empty the elevated tank. However, if you stop that flow for any reason or even slow it way down, it will lose it's siphon. I may be wrong, but I don't think it will maintain a siphon with the output going to a generator that idles down when the load drops and it's only using a trickle of gas. If I had a boat tank I would try it but I don't think I'm gonna buy one. I just don't think it will work to keep a generator going unattended all night.
 

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If you put an on/off valve will hold the fluid in.

There is more than one way to skin a cat. Most gens, as far I know, they are gravity fed. Very simple designs to keep cost down and reliability.
 

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An on/off valve would do no good when the generator goes into s idle mode and using a trickle of gasoline. Gravity feed is great but you're not feeding by gravity with a boat tank. You are feeding by forcing gas through with a primer bulb, then siphoning till the fuel pump picks it up. Boat motors that use a remote tank have fuel pumps. My Champion generator does not.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Update and Additional Question.

Thanks again everyone for all the advice. It's really helped.

So far, this is what I have done:

1) From the carburetor input I added a fuel filter which then goes to a 3-way shut off valve.
2) One inlet goes directly to the onboard fuel tank - with the fuel filter I'm now more comfortable using the on-board tank.
3) The other inlet goes to the external fuel tank. This fuel line also has a primer bulb and shutoff valve to minimize fuel spillage when I disconnect the line.

As long as the external fuel tank is elevated, it works great. The engine does not have enough suction to place the fuel tank on the ground.

I'd like to add some fuel connectors so I can connect and disconnect the hose easier than using barb connectors.

Can anyone recommend fuel connectors that provide 1/4 barb connectors on both ends?
Can anyone recommend fuel connectors that provide 1/4 barb connectors on both ends that also automatically shuts the fuel off when the line is disconnected?

Appreciate the help.
 

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I'm very confused on using an off the shelf gas tank (boat tank) to gravity feed a generator without a fuel pump. I don't think you will get a consistent flow after you pump the bulb up. Ideas on this??
I did this for about 30 years with an Attwood Marine 6 gallon tank sitting about 6 inches higher than the level of the carburetor on a Coleman PowerMate PM1500. A couple of squeezes on the primer bulb to get it going, and then it would run the tank virtually dry.
 
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