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LaSwamp- Your experiences during Ida were a big part of me joining his site. I hope our generators aren’t needed, and I know you changed your fuel tank situation, but for the love of the Swamp Gods, get a couple Thermacells also!
It was a real learning experience. We were prepared for Ida, but there were still some tweaks that we picked up on that would have made things run a bit smoother. One thing that was made even more abundantly clear than it already was, i.e., gasoline is king after the storm passes and the power company has no estimates on restoration. You could tell by the gas station lines that a lot of people didn't factor in fuel use. They had a full tank in the generator plus an extra 5 gallon jug and they thought they were good to go. After 30 hours, if that long, they had run through all of their fuel and they were frantically searching for an open station. After Gustav in '08 and the flood in '16, I thought people would be more aware of the need to stock up. But that wasn't the case.
 

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I am a little conservative when it comes to prep. Historically, we only get relatively short outages so my fuel on-hand (LP) is good for at least a day, enough time to go out and buy gasoline.

If the outage is going to be longer, I don't think I would want to run the generator all the time. I can run it intermittently and only during those times it makes the most sense. Maybe 4 hours on then 4 hours off during the day and on the whole evening.
Unfortunately, we really can't run the generators that way. It's so hot and humid here after most hurricanes, conditions become unbearable quickly. The window units have to run just to keep the house from becoming a sauna. The solution I've found is to have several inverters and rotate them from day to night. I have a 1800 watt inverter that I think will run two window units overnight. And it sips fuel. During the day, we would run the two larger inverters. That way, no inverter runs for longer than about 12 hours a day. Being able to scale power output massively saves on fuel compared to running a very large generator 24/7.
 

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I follow a meteorologist in Birmingham Alabama, James Spann. He’s on Facebook too, if you’re there. He's very good, and doesn’t sensationalize the weather events. He seems reasonably sure this will be a major hurricane that will affect the peninsula of Florida and not the panhandle. That seems to be what NOAA is currently saying too.
 

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I follow a meteorologist in Birmingham Alabama, James Spann. He’s on Facebook too, if you’re there. He's very good, and doesn’t sensationalize the weather events. He seems reasonably sure this will be a major hurricane that will affect the peninsula of Florida and not the panhandle. That seems to be what NOAA is currently saying too.
I'm waiting for the latest tracking from NOAA that I think was due about 2 hours ago. Not sure why they're running late with it. The storm is tracking pretty far east of us at the moment. It depends on when it makes the turn to the north, though.
 

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Unfortunately, we really can't run the generators that way. It's so hot and humid here after most hurricanes, conditions become unbearable quickly. The window units have to run just to keep the house from becoming a sauna. The solution I've found is to have several inverters and rotate them from day to night. I have a 1800 watt inverter that I think will run two window units overnight. And it sips fuel. During the day, we would run the two larger inverters. That way, no inverter runs for longer than about 12 hours a day. Being able to scale power output massively saves on fuel compared to running a very large generator 24/7.
I hear you. I agree that switching between big and small generators depending on need is a good idea. Makes efficient use of available fuel.
 

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They are saying this Hurricane Fiona (currently 125 mph winds) about to hit Nova Scotia and Newfoundland will be the worst storm to hit that area since 1938. It’s moving north at 46 mph and looks like it may just graze the east coast of Nova Scotia, which is good for them and bad for Newfoundland.
 

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You can't be over prepared. I have been through (in the path of) two major hurricanes (Camille, Katrina) and several smaller ones. These storms taught me to never live in an all electric home. I have heat, hot water and stove on propane. Camille cause a 5 week electrical outage and Katrina a 3 week outage. I live in a rural area and the loggers and the farmers will have the road to town (7 miles) passable in 48 or maybe 72 hours. Gas stations will not be open until their power is restored and will sell out immediately. In my experience they will not be able get new supplies for at least 2 weeks and probably more. I store about 30 gallons of gas and rotate it to keep it fresh, but that will be consumed very fast. My solution is a 250 gallon propane tank and a dual fuel generator. As soon as the roads are passable my propane service can deliver. After both Camille and Katrina the propane suppliers were able to deliver fuel and they had no problem getting re-supplied. If I lived in town my generator would be a tri-fuel unit. The natural gas supply was not affected in my area by any of the storms.
 

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You can't be over prepared. I have been through (in the path of) two major hurricanes (Camille, Katrina) and several smaller ones. These storms taught me to never live in an all electric home. I have heat, hot water and stove on propane. Camille cause a 5 week electrical outage and Katrina a 3 week outage. I live in a rural area and the loggers and the farmers will have the road to town (7 miles) passable in 48 or maybe 72 hours. Gas stations will not be open until their power is restored and will sell out immediately. In my experience they will not be able get new supplies for at least 2 weeks and probably more. I store about 30 gallons of gas and rotate it to keep it fresh, but that will be consumed very fast. My solution is a 250 gallon propane tank and a dual fuel generator. As soon as the roads are passable my propane service can deliver. After both Camille and Katrina the propane suppliers were able to deliver fuel and they had no problem getting re-supplied. If I lived in town my generator would be a tri-fuel unit. The natural gas supply was not affected in my area by any of the storms.
That was the situation here. A hardware store just up the road from me was filling 20 pound cylinders for free after Ida. But gasoline was hard to come by for about a week. I don't have any dual fuel generators, but I wish I had my cylinders with me at the time. I can store about 40 gallons of gasoline at this location, so I would be okay for quite a while if we lost power again and I needed to be here. At my other location, I can store about 80 gallons. Plus, most everything there is natural gas, so we're comfortable in an extended outage.
 

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They are inching Ian's track westward, now showing landfall in the crook of Florida. Historically not many storms land there. Map is from 1950-2017. View attachment 12735
It will move 10 more times before landfall, the models look like they’re all over the place, but the latest shift is really worrisome as the storm skirts Cuba’s west end, instead of loosing strength going through the mountains. Then the storm would have the entire GOM to travel through.

Forget that noise, that’s no bueno.
 

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