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Looking back at a post from September 18th "Broken Cables" I (we) hope the best for the Ernest as PR took a bad hit.
As grim as his post's timing was there is something we all are reminded of: be prepared.

Buying a generator is only part of the puzzle...maintaining (exercising, oil, storing it in a safe place, making sure that it works) a generator comes with the territory.

Last winter our area experienced only one "nor'easter"; heavy snow/wind/school cancelled/scattered power outages.....hey, it's New England.

A family friend (living in a rural area) always preaches that her husband is a survivalist; six months of reserve food/water/generator.....
During the above-listed storm there was a felled tree that took out the power to her home for almost three days...so,
out comes their generator and-it-wouldn't-start.......("It ran when we got it two years ago...")....my guess: probably bad gas.... What a surprise.

She and her survivalist husband stayed at a relative's house until power was restored.

I am quite sure that those who visit this forum maintain their generator(s) to some extent, but the above is an example of "Joe-Q-Public" vision of being prepared - not.

When I see a storm on its way (usually all over the news 3-4 days prior) I top-off my gens and fill two 5-gallon gas cans.... I have only had to use a gen for back-up power a few times in the past 12 years - but I am ready to do so "in a pinch" if need be.

Things happen. Generators are mechanical, thus failure is always a possibility....but people must do their part to maintain them (like changing their car's motor oil...it's gotta get done).

We all hope that Ernest and his family are OK.
 

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yea it depends on the type of storm.
iowa dechero back a few years left folks with out power for over a month in some areas.
so the best plan is to plan your fuel.
for those of us on natural gas remember to have a plan B as NG in some areas could be shut off during an long power outage event.

i would say have a plan for fuel for at least a month.
and tri fuel gives you options.
and at least one back up generator is a good plan.
at least a small one to power the fridge freezers and a few led lights.
the small gens sip fuel.

i prefer honda eu series of inverter gens...
super quiet. and the power is pretty good.
and yes you can run them in parallel for more power to scale up and down during a long run...

service parts are always a good plan.
extra filters, spark plugs, plenty of oil and oil filters.
spare recoil rope, starter if it is electric start.
make sure to change out the battery on electric start every 2-4 years and run a good after market battery conditioner.
they make the SLA batteries last longer

storms are getting worse...
no place on good old mother earth is safe....
and with the grid in question in most areas. a private power plan is a solid idea!

stay safe out there!
 

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I have a 2600watt cheap generator that I keep outside 24/7 by the side of the house with a weather proof cover on, all hooked up with fuel+stabilizer so its just ready to go in a powercut.. Its been outside 3yrs now and still looks new with little build up of rust, I make sure its run monthly with a light load and this seems to keep it running well.. I have replaced the battery and the fuel line in the last few months, but its been rock solid till then.
 

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Things happen.
They sure do, pretty much every time when you least expect it. Keeping current with the weather forecast on a daily basis is a necessity in being prepared. Severe winds, tornados are bad enough in my book, I cant imagine living in a hurricane region as some of you do.
I have 3 generators on hand (and keeping an eye out for an inexpensive fourth to pair up with a 2200). I keep the tanks on all of them full & treated with enough fuel on hand to run 2 weeks that can be stretched to go longer if needed.
Buying a generator is only part of the puzzle
Aint that the truth! Living in a snow belt region, snow removal equipment and maintenance is also a high priority for me.
failure is always a possibility...
I agree. Regardless of the mechanized item I have on hand, they may not look pristine, but I keep up on them and have full confidence that I can walk out and fire any one of them up for duty at a moments notice.
It can be alot of work but it'll be worse if you fall behind on maintenance.
For those of you new to the game of DIY repairs, I'd suggest learning your equipment and keeping a few maintenance items on the shelf such as as spare spark plug or 2, a quart or 2 of oil and some non-chlorinated brake clean.

Vehicle Snow Automotive tire Snowplow Tree
 

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I have enough gas for three days, and the cans for 6. Slowly adding propane units so that I have those ready for a 2/3 day outage, without having to worry about storing gas for so long.

And yessir, parts are important, at least the basics like an extra spark plug and spare oil. And also, your family knowing how to hook things up also.This is important, so don’t forget them.
 

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We're eyeing something in the tropics right now. Some models have it getting into the Gulf of Mexico, but it's still very early and it's almost impossible to predict right now what the ultimate path of this storm is going to be. I will have about 60 gallons of gasoline on hand, plus the 8 gallons in the generators already. It should be enough to last about a week with careful management, maybe a bit longer. I doubt we'll see anything that draconian, though. Total fuel storage capacity is about 120 gallons in a worst case scenario. I'd probably be okay for about 2 and a half weeks before I had to start thinking about finding more fuel. It'd take a pretty massive storm and severe damage to the grid here to cause that kind of outage, though.
 

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We're eyeing something in the tropics right now. Some models have it getting into the Gulf of Mexico, but it's still very early and it's almost impossible to predict right now what the ultimate path of this storm is going to be. I will have about 60 gallons of gasoline on hand, plus the 8 gallons in the generators already. It should be enough to last about a week with careful management, maybe a bit longer. I doubt we'll see anything that draconian, though. Total fuel storage capacity is about 120 gallons in a worst case scenario. I'd probably be okay for about 2 and a half weeks before I had to start thinking about finding more fuel. It'd take a pretty massive storm and severe damage to the grid here to cause that kind of outage, though.
It's funny, when the models started to look like it might make it in to the Gulf I thought about you. I thought is it going to be us in SW Florida this time, or is it going to be you guys again. Of course right now it could be anywhere from Mexico to us. At least it looks like it will be past Puerto Rico before it develops. Those guys don't need anything more for awhile.
 

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It's funny, when the models started to look like it might make it in to the Gulf I thought about you. I thought is it going to be us in SW Florida this time, or is it going to be you guys again. Of course right now it could be anywhere from Mexico to us. At least it looks like it will be past Puerto Rico before it develops. Those guys don't need anything more for awhile.
Early runs appeared to have the storm hooking into Florida, around Tampa. But the track seems to have moved westward significantly in the past 24 hours. The Gulf is pretty warm now, so if it gets in there, strengthening is probably a certainty. My guess is the tracking is going to be all over the place until the storm actually forms. This late in the season, high pressure ridges coming in from the northwest become a major factor. It's going to be a while before there's any reliable information about where this thing might go.

Yeah, PR got slapped pretty hard by Fiona. Entergy has told us it could be much longer this time if the grid is damaged in our area. I'd have to make sure to have enough fuel on hand to last a while if it came to it. I will be surprised if the storm comes this way. It would have to slip through between fronts.
 

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@LaSwamp I'm right here with you on the northern gulf coast. If a storm comes, I’ll have enough gasoline for about a week. I don’t have a truck anymore, but if I did I would have one of those tanks installed in the bed behind the cab with the pump, hose and nozzle. The one I was looking at wasn’t cheap! How do you store so much gasoline? I’m using five gallon metal military spec cans.
Minimal hurricanes blow through Nova Scotia quickly, but seem to kick their butt. Kinda like how snow kicks our butt here in the Deep South.
 

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@LaSwamp I'm right here with you on the northern gulf coast. If a storm comes, I’ll have enough gasoline for about a week. I don’t have a truck anymore, but if I did I would have one of those tanks installed in the bed behind the cab with the pump, hose and nozzle. The one I was looking at wasn’t cheap! How do you store so much gasoline? I’m using five gallon metal military spec cans.
Minimal hurricanes blow through Nova Scotia quickly, but seem to kick their butt. Kinda like how snow kicks our butt here in the Deep South.
I have a 55-gallon oil drum that I converted into a gasoline tank. It seems to work pretty well for gas storage. And I have eight 5-gallon jugs, about eight 2-gallon jugs, and a 9-gallon marine tank. Plus what the inverters themselves hold, about 8 gallons. But maxing out like that would only happen in a worst-case situation. However, I should be able to last quite a while if I did have to stock that much fuel. It was sobering seeing those lines of cars at the gas stations after Ida passed through. A lot of people were not prepared for a power outage of any real length. They ended up stuck in hours-long gas lines trying to fill their 5 gallon jug for their generator. It looked miserable.
 

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When Katrina happened I was separated from my previous wife, and living in an apartment totally unprepared. I told myself, never again. I stay prepared for a disaster 24/7 year round, except for gasoline which I ramp up when a storm threatens. My current wife thought I was silly storing toilet paper, until the great toilet paper shortage happened a couple years ago. We sailed right through it without ever having to purchase a roll. When I was a teenager, we didn’t have power for two weeks after a hurricane. Considering that, I would like to be able to access the gasoline in my vehicle's gas tank.
 

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When Katrina happened I was separated from my previous wife, and living in an apartment totally unprepared. I told myself, never again. I stay prepared for a disaster 24/7 year round, except for gasoline which I ramp up when a storm threatens. My current wife thought I was silly storing toilet paper, until the great toilet paper shortage happened a couple years ago. We sailed right through it without ever having to purchase a roll. When I was a teenager, we didn’t have power for two weeks after a hurricane. Considering that, I would like to be able to access the gasoline in my vehicle's gas tank.
Living in an apartment during a long power outage is definitely a non-starter. We lost power in '92 for about a week after Andrew. I was living in a townhome at the time and we bugged out of there.

We're pretty well set now for the most part. Multiple inverters and a fairly large supply of fuel for them. As long as we don't get physical damage to the structures, we should be golden.
 

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Hurricane Ida hit us hard in Lafourche Parish, we evacuated north to Livingston Parish,and it blew pretty hard in Livingston .Wind guest of 115 mph and Livingston is about 150 miles from gulf.After the storm passed Lafourche parish officials didn't let residents back in parish for a week.it took Entergy took almost 2 weeks to get electricity back to the central area of parish,southern part of parish took about a month.Hopefully we will be spared this time.
 

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Living in an apartment during a long power outage is definitely a non-starter. We lost power in '92 for about a week after Andrew. I was living in a townhome at the time and we bugged out of there.

We're pretty well set now for the most part. Multiple inverters and a fairly large supply of fuel for them. As long as we don't get physical damage to the structures, we should be golden.
I stayed in the apartment during Katrina, because I had to work until the storm was almost here. They were three story wood frame structures, basically cracker boxes in my opinion. My building fared pretty well, just some water damage from missing shingles. Other buildings in the complex lost entire roofs and one even lost the entire three story wall. It looked like a doll house. People initially used water from the property's ponds to flush the toilets. After a few days the sewer system backed up due to lack of power at the pumping station. It started to seem like a third world country. My Dad’s health was not good, so I got him and we bugged out. Went north until we found gasoline and electricity. Stayed in an average hotel, but it seemed like The Ritz after what we left.
 

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LaSwamp- Your experiences during Ida were a big part of me joining his site. I hope our generators aren’t needed, and I know you changed your fuel tank situation, but for the love of the Swamp Gods, get a couple Thermacells also!
 

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Among other things, I'm a ham radio operator. I'm in Virginia, but half a dozen years ago I had a long radio conversation with a ham on the Gulf Coast. I found it fascinating when he described his experience after Katrina rolled through. He lived on a farm, so his situation was much better than those in New Orleans. But his physical world quickly narrowed to the couple miles immediately around his farm. He described how immediately after the storm, he could hear quite a number of generators, in every direction. Within a couple of days, those sounds slowly extinguished, one by one, presumably as those folks ran out of fuel.

Storing a reasonable quantity of gasoline is tough. My older EU2000is sips gas. My new EU7000is, purchased primarily so I could drive my well pump during grid outages, is quite a bit thirstier! The five 5-gallon gas cans I keep in the shed (non-ethanol, treated with stabilizer, and rotated out with fresh stock every six months) seemed reasonable when they were just feeding the small Honda. Not so much its big brother.

Propane is an obvious alternative. But for those of us not yet there, fuel strikes me as the weak point when contemplating emergency power. I wish there was a solution somewhere between the casual collection of gas jugs most of us keep and the buried-tank-like-at- a-gas-station that some farms employ.
 

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I am a little conservative when it comes to prep. Historically, we only get relatively short outages so my fuel on-hand (LP) is good for at least a day, enough time to go out and buy gasoline.

If the outage is going to be longer, I don't think I would want to run the generator all the time. I can run it intermittently and only during those times it makes the most sense. Maybe 4 hours on then 4 hours off during the day and on the whole evening.
 

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At the risk of sounding melodramatic... I turned on the TV at work this morning. We have it on the news for the customers at the counter. The local weather was front and center. I know it can change between now and then. But they're getting braver with their predictions which they usually don't until they're pretty sure. Long story short, they've got us square in the middle of the cone. I guess we'll know more by the end of the weekend. I've gone into, Time to pay more attention mode.
 
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