128 Volts - Generact 500Watt SVP5000 - Power Equipment Forum : Power Equipment Forums
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post #1 of 7 (permalink) Old 08-29-2019, 08:02 PM Thread Starter
evh
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128 Volts - Generact 500Watt SVP5000

I bought a used Generac SVP5000 generator from someone that was hardly used. I think Year 2000 vintage. I cleaned the carb and it seems to run fine. I decided I should check the voltage. Measures roughly 128 volts with and without load (1,500 Watt Heat Gun). I checked that against my 2,000 Watt newer Inverter Generator. It is spot on 120 volts.

I think I should adjust it right? Do I do that at the carb or governor? The governor has many different holes on it for the lower spring like it was made for this type of adjustment. See attached picture. Thoughts? By the way, it is a 10hp Briggs.
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post #2 of 7 (permalink) Old 08-29-2019, 09:28 PM
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"Acceptable" line voltage is 105-132V, but I like 120-122V for my uses. If the AVR is adjustable, that's where I'd aim for. You need to maintain 3600RPM for 60Hz, so the governor is not where you should be tinkering, unless it is not at 3600RPM/60Hz currently.

Here's the manual if you don't have it: http://www.manualsdir.com/manuals/10....html?download

Last edited by tabora; 08-29-2019 at 09:33 PM.
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post #3 of 7 (permalink) Old 08-31-2019, 05:43 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the quick response tabora. I don't believe it has and adjustable AVR based on my research. If you are saying I shouldn't mess with the governor, then I guess it will run at 128V. I would rather it be at 120V, but I am not sure what else I could do.
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post #4 of 7 (permalink) Old 08-31-2019, 10:14 PM
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Voice of experience/scar tissue, don't mess with the governor!!! Power coming in from your utility isn't a "pure" 120V, but depending on what's going on falls more in line with the range Tabora mentioned.
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post #5 of 7 (permalink) Old 09-01-2019, 07:25 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the second confirmation exmar. I will leave well it alone. Glad I asked.
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post #6 of 7 (permalink) Old 09-01-2019, 12:15 PM
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I agree that you shouldn't blindly mess with the governor. Perhaps you should check the frequency of the output voltage though. If the generator is running fast, that might explain the higher than average voltage.

There are several ways to measure the frequency. Some of the better digital multiimeters can read frequency. You could use an oscilloscope if you have access to one.

Here's a down and dirty low-tech way to measure generator frequency:

If you have an old analog electric clock, you can plug it into the generator and measure its error relative to an independent and accurate time piece. (The speed of the synchronous motor in the clock is directly determined by the frequency of the applied voltage. This may even work with some digital clocks, but that can vary) The longer you run it, the more accurate you can be in calculating the error ratio. An hour is probably a good time period for decent accuracy.

Divide the displayed elapsed time of generator-powered clock by the true accurate clock elapsed time. If the result is greater than one, the generator is running fast, if the result is less than one, the generator is running slow. You can then use the ratio to calculate the frequency error. Expect some error. Plus or minus two or three hz is probably okay.

If you determine that the error is significant enough to require adjustment, you can make SMALL adjustments to the governor and retest. (Tightening the governor spring increases RPM and frequency.)

Last edited by motormonkey; 09-01-2019 at 12:21 PM.
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post #7 of 7 (permalink) Old 09-01-2019, 02:05 PM
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Also, a Kill-A-Watt meter will show frequency, and is a useful tool for measuring appliance draws, etc.
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